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Which Foredom handpiece


#1

Hi

I’m just setting up my studio again after a long illness and I need
to replace my old, extremely cheap (UKP 30) pendant motor and
handpiece which I bought as a student.

I’m looking at a Foredom 1/6 HP Reversible SR Motor, FCT foot
operated speed control and a handpiece - but there’s a choice of No20
quick release and No 30.

I like the sound of the ‘quick release’, but from what I can read is
the No30 a bit more adaptable?

Also is this a good motor to be buying?

Thanks
Denice


#2

Denice,

Welcome back. I bet your studio missed you.

I’m forwarding your inquiry to our Foredom guru, Mike Zageliski who
can answer the motor question for the UK power concerns.

However, as for the handpieces, get both. They are different
beasties. I need the grip of a #30 for a large chewing bur, and I
won’t get that if I have a quick release. I can’t live without my
quick release either, so its more of an apples and oranges situation.
Both are terrific and both have separate and equal uses.

The reversible is a good motor and I believe it will work well in
the UK.

Regards,
Karen Christians


#3

Goodmorning,

I had two foredome’s in use. One (cc) is about 12 years old and is
still working. The other heavier one (HR) is burned after 4 years
(!!!) of use. No spare parts available since this is an older model
The rotor inside is burned an behind any repair.

What I don’t like about foredome is te stiffness of the flex. It’s
really pulling on your wrest to my opinion causing premature
fatigueness. They are very good for heavy work but not for drilling
en stonesetting for a longer period of time.

My third one is a very old german model (30 years!). This one is
very flexable and I can use it for days !! The handpiece is nice to
hold and no pulling action -even after many hours of use- is
experienced. Spare parts are still available !!! However, this
Handpiece can not be used for heavy work.

Now I’m considering to buy a new one but I don’t know which one. A
Micromotor is crossing my mind but still I need to try it first. The
prof hangmotors here in Belgium and Germany are about 300 up to 500
Euro depending on what you want to pay for it. No noise, pure luxury
to work with and very fine flex has a price ticket. To reduce it all
back to your question, it depends on what your needs are, what you’re
going to do with it in the long run.

Have fun and enjoy
Pedro


#4
I'm looking at a Foredom 1/6 HP Reversible SR Motor, FCT foot
operated speed control and a handpiece Also is this a good motor to
be buying? 

It’s an excellent motor to be buying! Foredom is the Rolls Royce of
pendant motors. I have the SR model which I bought from Rio Grande,
after using my husband’s Dremel for months. The Foredom is sweet by
comparison and works well both at high (polishing) and low (torquey
stone-setting) speeds.

You won’t regret this purchase.

Helen
UK


#5

Hi Denise,

I always recommend that jewelers have a No.30 handpiece on their
bench. It accepts a wide variety of shank sizes up to 5/32" (4mm).
It’s the most versatile handpiece plus you might want to use one of
the many type tools that use it such as the Jump Ringer, the AllSet
Stone Setting Tools, Matt Wax Working Tools, the Belt Sander, and the
Foredom Drill Press. I also think though that you will find yourself
using the quick change type handpiece most of the time so you should
get one also. In any case you should always have at least one back up
handpiece like a spare tire for emergencies.

I think that you will be very happy with the 1/6HP SR motor. It has
lots of power and is very dependable. Plus the reverse function can
come in handy.

Mike Zagielski
Foredom Sales Manager


#6
I like the sound of the 'quick release', but from what I can read
is the No30 a bit more adaptable? 

Quick release handpieces are usually 3/32" - don’t know it offhand
in metric. The #30 - any one with a Jacob’s chuck - will take
anything from a #70 drillbit up to almost 1/4". I use a Jacob’s chuck
for that very reason- drilling, a certain number of 1/8" burs I have,
and what have you… There’s no real difference in quality or
performance, generally…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#7

Hi Denise,

The Foredom SR motor is a good choice. In my opinion, every shop
should have a Foredom 30 handpiece. If you get a second handpiece,
it will probably be a quick change handpiece. Remember that the SR
motor in reverse can unscrew internal parts of a quick change so use
your Foredom 30 handpiece with the reverse feature of the SR motor.

John
The Jewelry Equipment Dr.


#8

I’ve got two: a #30 and one of the swiss quick-change handpieces.
(the red ones.)

If I were just starting out, I’d go for the #30, hands down. That
was my only handpiece for…10-15? years. I just bought the swiss QC
a couple of years ago because I wanted a good QC for fast bit
changeouts for setting.

The #30 will grab anything from essentially zero diameter all the
way up to 3/16", so it’ll grab anything you might want to spin,
including jump-ring mandrels, screw-eyes for twisting wire, or
anything else your fevered mind can dream up. They also fit into a
whole slew of accessory tools. Definitely it should be your first
handpiece. I don’t know if the new ones are coming with the
chuck-key with the handle or not, but if not, you can modify your
chuck-key by adding a handle to it so that you can spin it easily,
and then it’ll be almost as fast to tighten as a QC handpiece.

The reasons I went for the new QC handpiece were two: (A) fast bit
changes, and (B) a very narrow nose, so I can get my fingers right
down to where the bit is, and I can get the tool into tight spots.
The drawback is that it only takes 3/32" shanked tools.

In use, I’ve actually got a couple of motors rigged to the same
foot- pedal, so I leave the QC on one, and the #30 on another one,
and just flip a switch to select the one I want to spin. They
complement each other well, but if only had one, it’d be the #30.

For whatever that’s worth. Brian.

PS–If you can get one, you want a Lucas low-boy foot pedal. Don’t
be afraid, it’s not that Lucas. These actually work, and well too.
They don’t even smoke.

(I don’t know if they come in 220V though. I seem to remember that
you’re in the UK.)


#9

Hi Pedro,

What I don't like about foredome is te stiffness of the flex. It's
really pulling on your wrest to my opinion causing premature
fatigueness. They are very good for heavy work but not for
drilling en stonesetting for a longer period of time. 

One thing that you can do that will get rid of the stiffness of the
flexshaft itself is to replace the one that comes with the machine
when it’s new with a flexshaft that’s made of neoprene. These
flexshaft covers don’t have the woven wire in them the others do &
are a lot more flexible They’re available from Foredom & many of
Foredom’s dealers. I’ve been using them on 2 of my Foredoms for
several years & have had no problems. They are very easy to install…

Usual disclaimers, just a very satisfied customer.

Dave


#10
What I don't like about foredome is te stiffness of the flex. It's
really pulling on your wrest to my opinion causing premature
fatigueness. They are very good for heavy work but not for
drilling en stonesetting for a longer period of time. 

When the Foredom is at the right height there is a gentle curve from
the motor to your hand when you have it where you use it, it does not
go down and then up. There is no pulling on the motor. Very
comfortable for me to use and I do a lot of work with silicone
polishing wheels on castings without fatigue. My Foredom is old, but
my parts are older.

Richard Hart G.G.
Jewelers Gallery
Denver, Co.


#11

Like anything it depends.

Quick change is a great feature, especially when you change burs
frequently on the same job. Its slimmer so my fit your hand better.
The 30 has the chuck gear exposed so you might snag yourself now and
then. Really, most burs you need come in 3/32s anyway, if you can
only get one, the 20 is overall a better choice, imo.

Whichever you pick do try to get it with a duplex spring. In
addition to just being more flexible, it isolates the torque spikes
from the shaft.


#12

Denise,

Mike is on the money here.

I use the #30 myself, and it does EVERYTHING I need it too. If
you’ve used the smaller dremel flexshafts, you’ll get used to the
larger handpiece MUCH faster than you think.

Also, if you EVER have a problem with your Foredom, contact Mike (or
the company in general). Their customer service is FANTASTIC.

No affiliation, just a REALLY pleased customer.

LJ


#13
grab anything from essentially zero diameter all the way up to
3/16", 

Just FYI - Jacob’s chucks that you buy have a range of sizes listed,
usually. A 1/2" chuck wil only go down to 1/16" or something,
generally. Anyway, the #30 does NOT go to zero, though it gets
pretty close. It won’t take a #80 drill bit (that’s like a 6/0
sawblade). There are drill mandrels you can buy that DO go to zero,
if needed. Mostly it won’t matter, it’s just a point of fact.
Essentially zero for practical purposes, yes.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#14

Another thing to consider:

Foredom and other companies make attachments that fit the #30
handpiece. Allset setting and milling sets, and some Matt wax tools
are designed with the #30 handpiece in mind.


#15
What I don't like about foredome is te stiffness of the flex. 

Hi Pedro. Just get the special lightweight sheath (Rio, etc.) and
replace the original. MUCH more flexible. I love mine!

Allan


#16

I’ve always used the #30 or similar; it’s just what I’ve had
available and became accustomed to and really like. I especially like
it because although it is not ergonomic, it is nice and fat and now,
with some arthritis kicking in in my fingers, it is just the right
diameter.

The only other handpiece I have and use is a reciprocating hammer
handpiece for specific tasks.

Linda Kaye-Moses