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What is this disc?

Hi,

John Meszaros is posting from time to time pictures from his process on Instagram. In the process of putting together a collet he is using a thin disc to thin the prong base so they can be soldered together. I always wondered what that disc is, I expect it to be both abrasive and flexible somewhat so it doesn’t break.

Any idea? This is the picture
image

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There are a lot of thin discs with various types of abrasive applied to them on both sides. They may also be a solid abrasive material. Look at separating discs in the various online catalogs, but there are also diamond discs that do the same thing. Some can be very thin but also very fragile. I have one that I back with a small washer on each side of the disc to cut thin tabs on a type of bezel that I make. Good question…Rob

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Also search on the term cutoff discs…Rob

It’s called a snap on sending disc rio carries them ( get the special collet as well)

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I really appreciate your answer and Rob’s.

Is it the " E.C. Moore Magnum Brass-Center Snap-On Snap-Off Plastic-Backed Aluminum Oxide Sanding Disc" one?

I ended up ordering “E.C. Moore Coarse Moore’s Plastic Snap on Sanding Disc 7/8"” from Stuller, hopefully this will work like the one in the posted picture.

This is the one from Stuller:
image

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I use those all the time. They are flexible enough that they can conform to many surfaces.

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The EC Moore discs are by far my most-used flex shaft bits. I love them. I buy the paper-backed ones in bulk, in all the grits.

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I love Moores Discs, I use them all the time. I have had trouble finding the plastic backed discs lately. As far as I know, they are only abrasive on one side. If I want to sand two opposing pieces equally, as it appears that is being done in the picture, you can use a solid separating or cutoff disc sliding it between the opposing pieces sanding both pieces at once…Rob

I use both cut off disc’s and the Moores abrasive disc’s, probably more than any other single type of tool I use in the flex shaft. Period, barring possibly setting burs.

The cut off disc’s, I stock in several thicknesses, and also will “stack” them on a mandrel when I need to grind, or to cut a specific sized groove.
The Moores I now only stock in coarse, although by now I have several bags of finer grades that I have either tested, or reordered, forgetting how useless I found them for my work.
I go through a LOT of Moores disc’s, but once you develop a light touch with them you can do some very serious detail and clean up work with those disc’s. I usually “turn them under”, and work with the abrasive facing my hand piece, but there are times they solve a problem, by being turned so that the cutting surface is facing out.

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These “Moores discs” can be removed and turned over in a second. I use only the “Medium” grade, as this grade is best for all finishings.
The “Fine” grade is too smooth, and the “Course” is too rough, the “Medium” is my favourite.

“Gerry, on my iPhone”

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I was a Dental Lab professional for years, we used these plastic discs all the time!

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Two more things I would add. The paper backed Moore’s discs are stiff and good for flat shaping and the plastic backed ones are flexible and good for curved shaping. I love making bails with the plastic ones. I block out the rough shape with a saw and then use the disc to sculpt a lovely curvy bail.

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These “Moores” disks are just what I use to make the surface “slightly rough textured”.
A bright and shiny surface is tough on the eyes for “Raising Beads”. This also makes it very difficult to see & distinguish where the Bead is going to be. At our tender age of 78, WE must look after our eyes!
These “Moores” are the answer, you can use a FINE, or Medium texture rule supreme. The “Course” grit are too rough for this purpose.
Gerry, from Toronto, Canada.

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