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What Is Jewelry Design?


#1

Dear fellow Ganoksin members,

I am assuming most of us are makers of jewelry, and I have seen the
rants posted on Orchid concerning those who call themselves “jewelry
designers.” Anyone can bestow themselves with any title, including
the overused title of “artist.” But what are the skill sets required
to really deserve either title?

Ergonomics (designing for things to function on or with the human
body) is an important concern for both Industrial designers and
Jewelry makers. Jewelry that is un-wearable, for any reason, to my
mind is poorly designed even if it exhibits perfect craftsmanship.

MoMA has a section dedicated to modern industrial design where the
beauty of design transcends but does not inhibit the objects in their
utilitarian functions. What looks like a fabulous sculpture is
actually an orange juicer by designer Phillip Stark.

A respected teacher posed a question to me: How does a goldsmith /
artisan differentiate between design and creation? Clearly, many
people think that making jewelry and designing jewelry are the same
thing, but are they? What are the qualities that differentiate the
two?

Nanz Aalund
Associate Editor / Art Jewelry magazine
21027 Crossroads Circle / Waukesha WI 53187-1612
262.796.8776 ext.228


#2
How does a goldsmith / artisan differentiate between design and
creation? Clearly, many people think that making jewelry and
designing jewelry are the same thing, but are they? What are the
qualities that differentiate the two? 

The question is based on an assumption that we all share similar
creative processes. It is a false assumption, I think.

Some goldsmiths do meticulously design a piece before engaging in
the act of bringing it into physical being. Others may begin with a
core concept that develops in some respects as they delve into the
project itself. Still others may begin with a rock and some metal and
no preconceived notion of what they are bringing into being. Many, if
not most of us, have operated from time to time in more than one of
these modes.

How would an expressionist painter explain the division between
design and creation as he scrambles to capture a sunset with splashes
of color on a canvas? Would she/he necessarily share the same
creative process as one who devises delicate and clever findings as a
signature of their work?

I myself have worked in all three of these modes and have produced
finished pieces in each mode which I am variously happy or unhappy
with. Sometimes I seem to think/feel with my hands, intuiting rather
than planning what I am doing. Sometimes I have stared at a stone,
and stared at it, and done several sketches before I have settled on
a game plan.

Each approach has strengths and weaknesses. The meticulous planner
may find that his/her approach tends towards formalism, and is
imbalanced towards the conservative and the cognitive. She/he may
also find that meticulous planning unlocks a capacity for intricacy
and complexity. The spontaneous doer, on the other hand, produce
striking pieces which seem to emerge from the subconscious or even
collective unconsciousness, but may on the other hand find that their
finished pieces are unsophisticated, underdeveloped, or unduly based
on accidental factors.

So what is the answer? I think that it is not so much a matter of a
"right" way so much as finding your way. One friend of mine was
technically somewhat accomplished, in some respects much more so than
I, but he was chronically frustrated by the fact that many of his
pieces were just recitals of standard techniques employed in a
conventional way. I encouraged him to occasionally forget exquisite
karat gold and fine faceted stones, and just take some time with
silver or even copper and screw around with it like a happy idiot,
doing silly, nonsensical things he would never dare do with gold.
When he did things that really rock (and if he took my advice, he
would be doing unique things that absolutely rocked, probably in the
first hour) he could then do them in gold without the fear that drove
him to such conservatism. Another friend is very creative but frankly
"flighty" and impulsive- she does some interesting things, VERY
spontaneous, but mostly the result of accident and nothing compared
to what she could do if she was somehow forced to sit down and
actually get a good grasp of a technique rather than skimming over
the top of it.

Here’s why I am not rich: Rather than sell you the Unlock Your
Creativity and Worship Me As a God Seminar, I am telling you this
for free, and with the disclaimer that, despite my advice, both of
these people AFAIK are doing exactly the same things in exactly the
same way as they were previously. Of course, they did NOT heed my
advice, and this voids the warranty. Local restrictions may apply.
CreativeLee is a Delaware Corporation and may get away with Murder
under US law. Buy CreativeLee today.

Lee


#3

I will say, first of all, that I am what many call “Factory Trained”.
Although I took a basic course in jewelry in college, it was more for
fun. Which is to say, I am not from an academic background. Some
thoughts about your question, though. First, I do not share the
contemporary need to categorize everything. The music business is the
worst offender, I think. I think the need for a pretentious title is
related to that. I call myself what my old union classification was:
a Jeweler. More to the point, though, is an example. Let’s say that a
customer wants a ring of some complexity made, it’s all thought out,
there’s no design work to be done, just the making of it. You give it
to two different jewelers, and when you get the two rings back, they
will be of a completely different character, even if they are both to
spec. That’s because the makers are “designing” with every stroke of
the file and every bend of the wire. The simplistic answer to your
question is, “Every metalsmith is a jewelry designer.” for that
reason - it’s the nuance - what many call “The Hand”. There is also
in this world true jewelry designers, people who sell renderings or
work in the design departments of the big jewelry houses and such.
Otherwise, like everything else in the
world, if it walks like a duck…


#4

Nanz,

A respected teacher posed a question to me: How does a goldsmith /
artisan differentiate between design and creation? Clearly, many
people think that making jewelry and designing jewelry are the
same thing, but are they? What are the qualities that differentiate
the two? 

This is my opinion and experience, not right or wrong, just my view:

I worked (some years ago) in the jewelry industry as a designer,
actually my title was design research and development manager, I was
also the master model maker “creating” the production maquettes.
Designing/creating the “original” piece is where the “art” comes in,
then the making the piece is where the “craft” comes in. I have seen
a lot of work that is NOT original by goldsmiths/jewelers that they
claim to be their design. Just a thought: Theoretically nothing is
original on some levels.

I used to spend a lot of time creating pieces (very wearable) that I
believed to be original even though I used design trends to
influence the designs. Maybe 1 out of fifty ultimately I would
consider a show stopper WOW original because through a synthesis of
influences there sprang from my hands a truly one of a kind. Trends
do influence the designers; what’s in, what’s not, influences
designers enormously, if they want to eat. God, the dreaded need to
survive influences all artists if they don’t have a “day” job.

Just a short ramble. I did some pretty amazing stuff; it has been
copied, expanded upon and plagiarized. Working for a manufacturing
company gives one no name. I still see some of my work and the
influences from pieces that I created in some of the jeweler’s’
trade magazines. Again, is anything we “design” truly
original???

Cynthia T. retired Jewelry Designer and master model maker. frequent
lurker and John Dach’s other half.


#5

Hi Nanz:

A respected teacher posed a question to me: How does a goldsmith /
artisan differentiate between design and creation? Clearly, many
people think that making jewelry and designing jewelry are the
same thing, but are they? What are the qualities that differentiate
the two? 

Respectfully, I’m not really understanding why people are so
disturbed by the labeling. Years ago, there was a big to-do in the
media because some guy portrayed the Virgin Mary in fecal matter (no
kidding). It was a big item for free speech. The Vatican was
affronted (as you can imagine). The man called himself an artist. I
don’t really care what he calls himself as long as his fecal matter
doesn’t come anywhere near me.

The other day, I came across a website (I should do less surfing and
more working) of jewelry (loose interpretation). The woman had made
a strap necklace, as she called it, “inspired by” the designs of (I
won’t use the name). It wasn’t an inspiration at all. It was an exact
copy. The woman had the nerve to “thank” the originator on the
website. This woman is a teacher. Now, she’s probably going to teach
her students how to be “inspired” as well The woman she copied makes
her living making designs for movie stars. Now, I was affronted.

I don’t think you can put artistry on a time line…as in “today, I
am a crafter, on November 23rd, I will become an artist”. No offense
to those who are formally educated, but just because someone puts the
hours in at a higher learning institution doesn’t make it so either.
It comes from within and I think it is more of a mindset than a
portfolio.

Why would anyone care if I called myself an artist, a crafter, a
designer, a whatever? Yes, I can understand the frustration and I
also have read all the rants on “designers”. Economics and a free
market economy will take care of the “designers”. I just want to be
able to get up in the morning and look myself right in the eye and be
happy with who I have chosen to be.

Sorry Nanz, to be so down on the subject. I think it’s the cold
weather.

Best,
Kim Starbard
Cove Beads


#6

Hi Nanz, for the most part I agree with your sentiments. I want my
work to be worn comfortably so that it can move about in the world.
Portability is one of the wonderful things about jewelry. I also
believe that if an object is intended to be worn-- on the finger,
ear, neck or lapel-- it should be constructed with that intent fully
in mind and decisions regarding its making carefully considered in
that light.

But I fervently believe that there is a place for jewelry that
stretches the limits of wearability and fragility. Anything that
pushes the envelope and allows us to change perspective, I feel, is a
valuable asset in the development of design, form and function. By
challenging long held beliefs, our field can grow. Even seemingly
outlandish ideas, strange materials or jewelry forms can be examined
and elements adapted to more ergonomically suited pieces.

Taking materials out of context, for instance, can be
transformative. Gut, insect parts and even dissected owl pellets all
can have their role in a piece of jewelry. Perhaps they would only be
worn under special circumstances or for specific occaisions. This
does not, of course, necessarily fly in the face of tradition.
Cocktail rings, mourning jewelry and reliquary pieces have all made
their appearances in the history of jewelry, challenging form,
content, function and material durability. Think of the gut pieces of
Maria Phillips or the pigment or insect part work of Jennifer Trask.
The latter incorporates beetle carapaces and grasshopper legs into
quite traditional forms-- all very well crafted. They can be powerful
pieces.

As you, I am always looking to the durability and wearability of
what is made. I find that the challenge and excitement often lies in
the bending of a bizarre or even unsavory material or concept/content
into a usable object. But, for me, I find at times that paying too
close attention to functionality can be limiting. That’s why I
eagerly await the work of others that tests known limits. It may not,
in the end, pan out. But the new paths that it opens I find valuable.

Hope all is well. It’s blowing like mad here in Seattle.

Andy


#7

Hi Nanz;

... How does a goldsmith /artisan differentiate between design and
creation?

One of my favorite topics for bloviation. Here’s my opinion, and
it’s only that. On the other hand, opinions are about all we’ve got
to work with on such issues.

First, design is a creative process. That said, how creative is a
matter of how much innovation and originality goes into the effort.

But I know what you’re asking. Is design the creative part and
execution just a matter of mechanics? The distinction between an
artist who works somehow only with his or her intellect and the
craftsman who works with his hands is a pedestrian concept. It’s
never that simple, and the politics have historical roots of a
socio-economic nature, but they are mistaken for ontological
clarifications. Later philosophical developments get tied up in the
semantics. And that’s the post-modernist doctrine, which, in my
opinion, is also immature.

So where does this go? Okay, suppose we just leave it at the first
premise? That “creativity” is the innovation, the originality.
Artistry is the articulation of the idea, the “design”, if you will.
And craftsmanship is the skillful expression, in materials, of the
final product. In making jewelry, I don’t care for anything that
doesn’t address all three of these concerns well. Will that work for
your professor? Not trying to be faceceous here.

David L. Huffman


#8

Many people pay alot of money to institutions of higher learning for
degrees of proving themselves learned and worthy. Many people who are
paying these great amounts do not see the wisdom of a well rounded
education and only want to concern themselves thier particular
subject of choice. This question of the selfbestowed title of
designer is a cloudy issue, there must be a wise saying that
addresses arguing with fools. Point being its all about the $$,
survival, prestige, ego, w h a t e v e r, you cant get someone to
hand over the bucks if you dont impress them or baffle them with corn
processed by male bovines. i dont have one of these degree’s as is
evident by my improper use of punctuation among other aspects of this
post - goo


#9

I think the difference between design and creation is, design is
something that is imposed on me by another, like a client. I work
with a client to create a design and have equal or a bit more imput
to the design because of my manufacturing knowledge or knowledge of
what is available in the supply end. A creation, on the other hand
is something I am compelled to make and will make despite all logic
and reason. The lack of market does not deter the creation. Design is
much more market dependent for me. Design also means future thinking,
is this design repeatable is a question that may come up where in
creating I don’t ask that question. Designing may also more heavily
rely on technique I have developed from creating. Creating will allow
me to experiment, designing must work correctly. Designing is where I
make my living, creating is where I have, well I was going to say I
have fun but, some creations take months and some don’t come off at
all. Ceating is time and money comsuming, designing is producing. One
is not superior to the other, they must, for me, coexist. I love them
both, more of one than the other drives me crazy. The ability to do
technique doesn’t make me an artist, the desire to try new things
does.

Sam Patania, Tucson
www.patanias.com


#10
How does a goldsmith / artisan differentiate between design and
creation? Clearly, many people think that making jewelry and
designing jewelry are the same thing, but are they? What are the
qualities that differentiate the two? 

The process of designing and the process of making are both
creative. In jewelry they are closely related. They can be either
intertwined or separated. Some people plan and draw and work out all
the details on paper before touching metal. Another way is to just
take tool to metal and let design happen. In both cases, the jewelry
is designed. But in one, the design is developed and perfected to
maximize the visual impact, appeal and marketability, while in the
second style of creation, design takes the back seat and everything
seems to just happen without much planning or direction.

Either way, it is important to realize how important design can be.
Designers in other media are paid big bucks because good design
sells. In our culture, design is everywhere and it is very powerful.
If you understand it, then design becomes another tool in your bag
(another language) used to bring life to your work. If you don’t and
you ignore design, the chances are your work will reflect that
disinterest too.

The bottom line is that design is what makes winners stand out.
Design is always a factor in buying decisions. It is often the added
value that tips the scale. Design is also a language that can be
studied and mastered. Some people learn and speak languages with
less effort, but all can learn the language of design. And once
understood and explored, design is where the real fun can be found.

I personally have taught jewelry design as a separate subject from
jewelry making, for almost 30 years. I find that many people who
make jewelry confuse the two. They often fail to take advantage of
what design has to offer, often because they think it doesn’t matter.
In my design class we combine a study of design theory with
techniques to spark creativity. Exercises yield a large field of
ideas that are systematically evaluated, honed and developed into
original jewelry sketches and models. That is the process of design
as applied to jewelry.

Alan Revere

Revere Academy of Jewelry Arts, Inc.
760 Market Street
Suite 900
San Francisco
California 94102
USA
tel: 415-391-4179
fax: 415-391-7570


alanrevere@aol.com
alan@revereacademy.com


#11
That "creativity" is the innovation, the originality. Artistry is
the articulation of the idea, the "design", if you will. And
craftsmanship is the skillful expression, in materials, of the
final product. 

The guy I trained under many, many years ago, who was both an artist
and a craftsman always said to me: An artist is someone who can make
one. A craftsman is someone who can make a pair.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-234-4392
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#12

Sam,

I think you have very eloquently put into words what I feel about
design and creativity. Years ago I had a real problem with a
sculpture professor over something along this line. For example, She
would say to the class “take this rock and carve a dog.” I told her
there was no dog in that piece of rock and so it could not be. When I
pick up a piece of stone it talks to me and tells me what is there. I
then chip away the parts that are imprisoning it. I see the folks
that do lapidary doing the same thing when they study a slab to see
what cut and shape will enhance the beauty of the stone. We all have
to find the place where we are comfortable with what is inside of us.
How we express that is creativity. There are many that can make and
sell things but there are too few artists. Thanks for your words and
the source for tufa…

Rick (Who quit that sculpture class.)
Beads, Bones& Stones
earthworks Finc(+)rivendell-farm.com


#13
bloviation 

Wow! What a great new (to me) word :-). Thanks, David!

Beth


#14
An artist is someone who can make one. A craftsman is someone who
can make a pair. 

I love it, Daniel! I’ll be quoting this for sure.

Noel


#15

Hi Nanz,

How does a goldsmith /artisan differentiate between design and
creation? Clearly, many people think that making jewelry and
designing jewelry are the same thing, but are they? What are the
qualities that differentiate the two? 

I am surprised to find that I never realized there was a debate
about what a “jewelry designer” actually is. You received many long,
wonderful replies on creativity and such but I didn’t really see an
answer to your question. Perhaps I am too literal minded. To be
certain of my point, I referred to my dictionary.

Design

  To conceive or fashion in the mind; invent 

  To formulate a plan for; devise 

  To plan out in systematic, usually graphic form 

  To create or contrive for a particular purpose or effect 

  To have as a goal or purpose; intend. 

  To create or execute in an artistic or highly skilled manner. 

  A drawing or sketch. 

  A graphic representation, especially a detailed plan for
  construction or manufacture. Create 

  To cause to exist; bring into being 

  To produce through artistic or imaginitive effort 

So my understanding is that a “jewelry designer” (primarily the ones
that everyone rails against on the lists) are people who design a
particular piece or line of jewelry and then someone else makes it.
To me, anyone limited to the titled of designer is someone who
doesn’t have the skills to make the jewelry themselves, OR has the
skills but chooses to hire out for the creation for any number of
reasons. I think the problem discussed on the list in the past has
been “designers” at shows where the vendor is supposed to have made
their products themselves, (That term “made by the artist” is a whole
other fireball) but everything was created by a factory and they just
designed the pieces.

Just my $.02

Nancy
Geosoul Arts
www.geosoul.com


#16

Nanz,

 A respected teacher posed a question to me: How does a goldsmith
/artisan differentiate between design and creation? Clearly, many
people think that making jewelry and designing jewelry are the same
thing, but are they? What are the qualities that differentiate the
two?

I’ve held off responding to this question because, the answer is
vague. Tonight I began reading some of our esteemed Orchadians
responses but I was still not satisfied. I believe Lee was close in
capturing the difference (or similiarities) but still, I was not
sure.

This question is always the first one with which I confront my
students. But, I call it ‘design and engineering’. Why? Because
design is the conjuring of an idea, concept, etc. But, no matter how
simple the design, it cannot be created without first being
engineered. Once all the problems are resolved, a skilled smith,
sculpturer, etc should be able to create the dimensional object.

Now,…that is not to say a designer is not an artist. In most
cases, they are the true artist. They conjur the idea and render it
in a manner that makes it visible and understandable. But only the
metal or stone (or whatever) artisan can convert it into something
that can be touched, felt, worn, etc.

Recently, I was contacted and asked to create an idea. Over a period
of nearly a year, the ‘designer’ (he was not an formal artist, simply
a person with an idea) plied me with his ideas about what should have
been a rather simple and straight forward item. I never had much
enthusiam about the project but when he said make it, I did. When it
was finished to his specifications, I knew it would not work. It
looked great…exactly what he wanted, but the center of balance was
all off. When he asked me how I could correct it…he didn’t like any
of my ideas until, finally, I told him that was it…it would just not
work the way he wanted it. Now I will modify it my way. You see, the
conjuror does not have all the answers so there IS a difference
between the concept (design) and the reality (a dimensional object
subject to all the physics of nature) and it lies in the
engineering.

I try hard to instill in students the idea that, as a maker, they
CAN also be a designer but not necessarily vise a versa. So, as they
conjur that pet idea, they must also consider the ramifications of
making it…all the steps from A to Z as well as all the esthetics
that are taught as necessary to good design; balance, durability,
blend, etc.

I do not believe there are specific qualities that separate the two
as. each has its own level of quality and fulfillment. For example,
once a designer renders their idea, unless they are also trained or
knowledgeable as a maker, they are finished. The creater is rarely
finished…there are always new and better techniques, improved
tools, expertise to be gained and, never is a piece perfect in the
eye of the maker.

I liken this question to the old Chinese delimna of, “How can a
white horse be white and a horse at the same time?” There is no final
answer,…only shades of difference and that is in the eye of the
beholder after all.

Sorry for rambling but…well, I guess you asked the question
didn’t you?

Cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio in SOFL where simple
elegance IS fine jewelry! @coralnut2


#17

Nancy at Geosoul Arts - - I like how you resorted to the dictionary
for the definition of “Designer”. It throws some light onto the
subject.

I have been following this thread with interest because I have been
struggling with what to call myself for a long time. I’ve wanted to
ask you all about this, but felt sort of stupid. Now I’m finally
gonna bite the bullet and see what you all say.

I am new to the business and I design and make my own jewelry and am
starting to try to sell it on the internet and through small shops,
word of mouth, etc. I have been calling myself a Designer because
none of the other categories seemed to fit right. Yet, I feel like
calling myself a Designer is a bad move because you all seem very
negative towards them and I don’t really understand why.

Nancy, you said:

So my understanding is that a "jewelry designer" (primarily the
ones that everyone rails against on the lists) are people who
design a particular piece or line of jewelry and then someone else
makes it. To me, anyone limited to the titled of designer is
someone who doesn't have the skills to make the jewelry themselves,
OR has the skills but chooses to hire out for the creation for any
number of reasons. 

To me, based on the dictionary definitions, it looks like a designer
could be one who simply thinks up a design and has someone else make
it for them, AND it can also be someone who thinks up the design and
actually executes it as well.

My confusion as to what to call myself started when I wanted to
register to attend the MJSA Expo New York show. I was thinking of
myself as “Jeweler.” But the available categories to register aRe:
Bench Jeweler; Caster; Chain Mfr.; Designer; Electroplater; Findings
Mfr.; Finished Goods Mfr.; Machine/Equipment Supplier; Metal/Alloy
Supplier; Mold/Model Maker; Packaging/Display Mfr.; Refiner; Retail
Buyer; Stone Supplier; Trade Press; and Wholesaler.

I had to pick one. The ones I thought I might fit into weRe: Bench
Jeweler, Designer, Finished Goods Mfr., Mold/Model Maker, or
Wholesaler. But none of these seem to really fit me right. I’m not
comfortable calling myselfa Bench Jeweler yet because my skills are
limited and I don’t think I could get a job as a Bench Jeweler. I
don’t think I really fit into the category of Manufacturer since I
make things slowly and in low quantity. Maybe Model Maker, but I do
all the other steps that need to be done to make and sell a piece
not just make models. Wholesaler - well, haven’t made a wholesale
sale yet. Will do so if opportunity knocks, but I’m also selling
retail on my website.

So - - what am I? I chose to register as a Designer - - yet, I feel
like I am giving myself a bad name before I even get started because
you all think badly of Designers.

So, should I be calling myself a Bench Jeweler even though I don’t
have the wide range of skills that Professional Bench Jewelers have?

Regardless of title, I’m totally looking forward to the Expo NY and
to the Big Apple Orchid dinner that Joel is so kindly organizing. I
went last year and it was a blast! Looking forward to seeing you all
again!

Nan

Nan Lewis Jewelry
artisan-made fine jewelry… different!


#18

Dear Nan,

I am new to the business and I design and make my own jewelry and am
starting to try to sell it on the internet and through small shops,
word of mouth, etc. I have been calling myself a Designer because
none of the other categories seemed to fit right. Yet, I feel like
calling myself a Designer is a bad move because you all seem very
negative towards them and I don’t really understand why.

I think the negative connotation of the title 'Designer" comes from
the perceived over use of the word when the person who is overusing
it is actually an assembler of components from supply houses. Now
this could also describe a bench jeweler but a bench jeweler also has
the technical ability to engineer the components not available from
supply houses. Bench jewelers also can repair which is a very
technical trade. I struggled for a long time as to what to call
myself, I wanted something that captured the imagination of the
person who asked but not over glorified what I do. I now respond by
saying I am a gold and silversmith who designs my own jewelry. The
title designer tends to make me think of one who does not do their
own work which to many Orchidians is not good. This may stem from
when designers conjure up something that is not engineerable or is
down right stupid. This may stem from lack of technical knowledge in
manufacturing or materials. This all gets very confusing if you let
it.

Sam Patania, Tucson
www.patanias.com


#19
So - - what am I? I chose to register as a Designer - - yet, I
feel like I am giving myself a bad name before I even get started
because you all think badly of Designers. 

Don’t think that. I’ve been on this list for I think less then a
week now, I have had poor experiences with people who call themselves
designers and so I can guess what the rants you speak of are shaped
like, but they are a small percentage of people working under that
name. You have to present yourself to the public somehow, Jeweller
is very vague, Goldsmith is missunderstood by a surprising number of
people and can come off as snobby, Silversmiths make flatware and
teapots and other things which although lovely aren’t very wearable,
you have to bite the bullet and sort out what you are comfortable
with and what your market is comfortable with, I think we all know
that here.

I’m going to hazard a guess about the prior rants, I know people
calling themselves designers have rubbed me the wrong way in the
past, not becuase they were designers, but becuase they were not. 2
or 3 becuase they were just assembling prefabricated parts and one
weird one who’s renderings were lovely but had no relation to the
laws of physics as I understood them. That’s less then 5, I’ve lost
count of the number of total people using the title I’ve met. There
are idiots working under every title to be had.

Basically, don’t worry about it, there are bigger fish to fry.

Cheers,
Norah Kerr
www.besmithian.com


#20

Recently someone asked about jewelry design for beginners.

I just happened across a Dover book “Design for Artists and
Craftsmen” by Louis Wolchonok. The copyright date is 1953 and the
illustrations attest to that. But the info is worthwhile; the author
breaks down design elements of different forms. For those not familar
with Dover books they publish many paperbacks that are of interest to
artists and craftspeople.

Kevin Kelly -in northern NM at 6800 ft. where the apricot tree is
almost in full bloom ( what’s this about global warming )