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Typical actual length of a cuff bracelet?


#1

I’m making a cuff bracelet and have some questions about length, etc.
What is the typical actual length of a cuff bracelet? 6.5 inches? 7
inches? And typically how big of a gap do you leave between the two
ends so people can put it on but it won’t slip off?

Thanks!
Beth Taylor


#2

in my own experience 6.5" - to be good general length for most cuffs
intend ed for smaller wrist sizes generaly found on human females.
Even more importantly ive found that the gap of a cuff bracelet is
better off center so that when you observe the bracelet one side or
leg or whatever term used to identify the part of the cuff that wraps
around the wrist that is to the inside of the arm is longer than the
opposite side inother words one side longer by 3/8" or so. Now when
the cuff bracelet is placed on the arm the longer leg of the cuff
should be worn to the outside of the body left wrist longer leg goes
to the left side of the forearm right wrist the right side of the
forearm.

if you are chuckling at this time or mystified as to why i am saying
this you may not have considered the movements of the bones in the
human forearm the ulna & radius( correct names ? ) and how they sort
of twist over each other when the hand is turned over palm up to
palm down. Palm up to Palm down movements make some styles or varied
designs of cuff bracelets slip off or be uncomfortable to wear.

my personal experimentation on this matter has led me to make a cuff
with the gap off center to compensate for this type of twisting
movement of the bones for certain styles of cuff bracelets as far as
getting the buying public to understand this well, that is another
matter

best regards goo


#3

Hi Beth

I’ve found that for women, 5 1/4 - 5 3/8" is the best average size,
with a gap about 1". For men, between 6 1/4 and 6 3/8", with a gap
about 1 1/4". And this presumes you’re measuring when flat. After
bending, measurements get harder.

Cuff sizing is not nearly so tough as ring sizing, but it’s still
tricky. I often make cuffs a little bigger than the above, so I can
cut a bit off at a show to resize for a smaller wrist. This gives me
a better shot at one piece fitting lots of people. Instant
gratification!

Allan
silvermason.com


#4

Goo wrote about making the opening of the cuff off-center to
compensate for the natural structure and articualtion of the bones.
He is spot on! This is why watch bands are made with differing
lengths too. It forces the center of the watch face, or the bracelet,
to rest on the center of the top of the wrist while the center of
the buckle, or the cuff opening, to be on the center of the
underside of the wrist.

Thanks, Goo, for pointing this out. I hadn’t given the cuff issue
the same thought as a watch band.

Nel


#5

It’s been interesting to read the various recommendations on this,
and how different they were. I suggested measurements somewhat
smaller than others did. I sell almost exclusively in California,
and I wonder if sizes overall might be a bit smaller here, since
there is such an emphasis on fitness and outdoor activitiy. I wonder
if perhaps Californians in general are in better shape than the
average American, and therefore somewhat smaller in size. Those of
you who have done shows both in California and other states can
attest to the fact that a California art show crowd contains a
relatively large number of attractive people. Or I could be full of
crap.

Goo’s suggestion of having the gap somewhat off center is
interesting, but it would seem to present real design challenges,
especially if there is some symmetry involved. And if the design was
asymmetrical, it could only be worn one way, and so would eliminate
the option of turning the bracelet around for a different view.
Still, a provacative possibility.

Allan
silvermason.com


#6
I sell almost exclusively in California, and I wonder if sizes
overall might be a bit smaller here, since there is such an
emphasis on fitness and outdoor activity. I wonder if perhaps
Californians in general are in better shape than the average
American, and therefore somewhat smaller in size. 

The annual survey of America’s fattest states was released today.
California’s ranking changed five places in 2009, from 41st fattest
state to 36th fattest state. In 1991, there was only one state that
was considered obese.

In 2009, there is only one state (Colorado) that is not considered
obese.


#7

Alan,

As the proud owner of an 8" wrist I am both annoyed and humored at
your stereotyping of attractive people having small wrists. And that
smaller wrists indicate a level of fitness. Have you seen the size of
the wrists on your governor? Although he is not in the same shape as
he was in his prime I think he is generally accepted as in shape and
attractive. I come by my large wrists both genetically (big boned)
and from my previous career in construction (muscular).

I have had custom orders in men’s rings up to size 22. I’m not that
fast of a runner any more so I’ll leave it to you to tell them that
they are not into fit or attractive.

Rick Copeland - Proud to Make Jewelry for the Big Beautiful People
of the World (even it they live in California) :slight_smile:


#8
I wonder if perhaps Californians in general are in better shape
than the average American, and therefore somewhat smaller in size. 

I lived for many years in southern California and we used to joke
that more beautiful (physically) people lived in there than anywhere
else, and that because of that more people tried to stay fit and in
good shape. Is it true? Im not sure. I have read recently however
that California ranks 41st among the 50 states in the percentage of
obese population. Colorado comes in 50th with the leanest
population. Mississippi is 1st with the largest percentage. Over all,
the size of the US population is gaining weight. Ive read that the
airlines are even considering increasing the width of their seats.

Does this mean that old traditional average sizes for bracelets,
anklets, rings, and perhaps even necklaces will change? Perhaps. As
always direct measurement will be the best method. Perhaps it would
be worthwhile to measure customers whenever possible and over time
gather some statistical data for your customer set.

Mike DeBurgh, GJG
Henderson, NV