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Touch-up resists for PnP Blue


#1

I have been doing a lot of electro-etching and have been using PnP
Blue. I always end up wanting or needing to do a little touch-up to
the image transferred onto the silver. Does anyone have a
tried-and-true substance they like to use? I tried Sharpie and it
was “buzzed” right off, and nail polish is weird. Tape has proven to
hold up well, but is hard to use to cover those little tiny 1/4mm
spaces. It seems the electro-etching is definitely much harder on the
resists than using traditional chemical mordants. Thanks for any
suggestions you might have!

Jennie


#2

I’ve found that Testors Enamel Paint works well for this (it doesn’t
matter what color…)

Jessi


#3

Try Staedtler Lumocolor permanent marker number 317. The red ones
seem to hold up best as a stop out. These markers come in four line
widths and the ink seems alot tougher than sharpies. Out of curiosity
would you share your etching procedure and mordant (electrolyte)
choice? Also how high is your current density? I’ve not used this
technique but am very curious about it. Most descriptions I’ve read
tell of near vertical etching with little under cutting of the
resist.

mike


#4
I have been doing a lot of electro-etching and have been using PnP
Blue. I always end up wanting or needing to do a little touch-up
to the image transferred onto the silver. Does anyone have a
tried-and-true substance they like to use? 

I use an enamel pen frequently used by enamelists (although I don’t
know how). It has a very fine tip ( < 1 mm) and is super tough. I’ve
found mine in a large stationer’s store, but have also seen them in
big box stores occasionally and at stained glass suppliers. It works
fine in ferric nitrate and ferric chloride, but haven’t tried it
with electro-etching. It’s inexpensive enough to give it a shot. I
suggest trying it on a piece of scrap to see if you get the results
you want.


#5

Jennie,

Does anyone have a tried-and-true substance they like to use? 

I have tried all the resists that you mentioned with similar results.
I have had some luck with a Sharpie, extra fine point, paint pen that
I picked up at a Joann store but it too is not one hundred percent
reliable. I have not been able to determine the cause of the variable
results. When you find the tried and true substance please let me
know.

John
Juneau, AK


#6

I’ve been etching with PnP Blue and other image transfer papers for
many years now. I almost always need to do some image touch-up and I
have found using StazOn Ink works the best. I use a very fine
paintbrush to apply it where I need it. It can be a bit tricky to
find, but it lasts a really LONG time since a little goes a very
long way.

BBR - Sandi Graves
Stormcloud Trading Co
www.Beadstorm.com


#7

Printing supply houses carry special markers for touching up offset
negatives. Those should work – but test it first.

RC


#8

I use what printmakers use. It is an etching ground or covering
ground. I like the brand Charbonnel. A small bottle of this stuff
has lasted me about 4 years. I apply it with a small brush and it
never breaks down in the acid (nitric).

Good luck, Shane Miller


#9

Jennie,

Paint pens work very well. You can get them at craft stores. Sharpie
actually makes them (in addition to permanent markers) but I prefer
the Deco brand, the paint is thicker. Beware though they leak easily.
Maybe not the best solution, but the best I found. Anyone else?

Sharon Kaplan


#10

Regardng touch-up products

there is a product for screen printers called "rubylith"that is also
sold in a pen form; a viscous liquid. I think the maker’s name is
Olano. You can find it at printmaker’s suppliers, or art supply
houses. It is superior to any other product I have ever tried for
correcting masking mistakes. It has a number of tip sizes and costs
about 12 bucks per pen…I have also used “masquepen” it takes longer
to dry - the rubylith is instant- and fills in holes in the PnP
well. Keeping the tip clean is important with the masquepen.


#11

I looked on the Dick Blick web site and saw that Rust-O-Leum makes
an enamel paint pen. That should hang on thru just about anything.
However, they are not for sale on the web site. Said hazardous
material shipping charges. Maybe by phone or at the store or from
catalog. They come in 3 widths. This sounds like REAL paint not a
Sharpie marker.

Justine