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Super glue and soldering


#1

Hi All,

I have often heard that super glue is used as a method to tack
pieces together before soldering. I would love your responses of how
and when you all use super glue as a soldering tool.

Thanks! Jeanie


#2
I would love your responses of how and when you all use super glue
as a soldering tool. 

Rarely to never.

It’s a cheat when you can’t do it another way. Breathing burning
super glue = bad.

This was done now and then when I worked on Jewelers Row. Not that
that makes it right.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#3

Since heat releases the superglue bond, I don’t know how well this
would work.

RC


#4

Hi Jeannie

I use superglue to hold two sides of a locket together while I file
a groove to later insert a hinge. Once I start to solder the hinge
in, the superglue burns up and the two pieces are separate again,
which is just what I want.

Cheers
Anna Williams


#5

You do not want to heat superglue–it gives off very noxious fumes.
Or do it under a ventilation hood at least.

Fred Pilon
http://photonfanatic.com


#6
It's a cheat when you can't do it another way. 

Why is this cheating? It’s imply another way of jigging or setting
up work…


#7

I’ve tried using superglue to tack pieces togetehr for soldering,
but it has not worked well. It burns off before soldering
temperatures are achieved, and the carbon left seems to prevent good
solder flow.

The one exception is for filigree. Gluing filigree down to a
nonreactive plate (like Ti) with superglue, then using powdered
solder to solder the pieces together, works fine; the glue is mostly
there to hold the bits in place as you add more bits, so when it’s
ready for soldering, you really don’t need holding as long as things
were positioned well and you don’t bump them! Since the glue only
affects the bottom of the filigree, the top can solder and later you
can re-flow so it’s all soldered.

I do recommend a very good ventilation system, AND not putting your
face close to the piece as you work.

Amanda Fisher


#8
The one exception is for filigree. Gluing filigree down to a
nonreactive plate (like Ti) with superglue, then using powdered
solder to solder the pieces together, works fine 

Super glue has more uses than than, too numerous to describe. Prior
to super glue, goldsmith were using shellac for the same purpose.
Super glue is simply more convenient. If vapors a concern, it can be
dissolve in acetone. As far as soldering, super glue is used in
preparation for soldering. In some situation it is easier to assemble
with super glue and then secure it with binding wire or plaster of
paris. Super glue does not interfere with solder flow.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#9
I'd be shocked if breathing burning super glue isn't harmful, but
a "cheat"? 

A tool is a tool. A clamp by any other name… In my view, however
one achieves ones objective: a perfect fit, a clean strong joint, a
well set stone, etc., it is the result that is important.

Marianne


#10

Hu Jeanie…I am still a novice but I have never tried using
super-glue nor have I heard of it being used. I think you need a
third hand, locking tweezers, thumb tacks and some
experimentation…Bob


#11

Hi Jeanie.

Yes I have used super glue to help keep pieces in position while
solderingalthough its been while now since I’ve needed it. Once your
experience grows you will you need it less and less. Now most things
I solder fit together really well and I mostly dont require anything
extra to keep them in place.When I make a master pattern I wherever
possible include guiding pins or some wayof clipping the pieces
together so they are easy to locate and stay in the exact
position.Todays piece was attaching STG leaves to a 3mm thick wire. I
had made the master with .7mm thick wire pins about 1.5mm long
sticking out of the stem of the leaf then I drilledsame size holes in
the wire. Not everything you do can be put together that way but a
lotcan. Even hand made pieces can go together really easy if you plan
them well.

Another thing about the superglue is apparently the fumes that are
made when its heatedare about as toxic as you can get. Cyanoacrylate
fumes can cause at least breathing difficulties. Hope your having fun
with your work

Phil W


#12
Gluing filigree down to a nonreactive plate (like Ti) with
superglue, then using powdered solder to solder the pieces
together, works fine; the glue is mostly there to hold the bits in
place as you add more bits, so when it's ready for soldering, you
really don't need holding as long as things were positioned well
and you don't bump them! 

Filigree bits should be held in place by tension so that when lifted
in the air BEFORE soldering, no parts will fall out! If any parts
need to be glued in place, it means the item will not have the
structural integrity required to last over time which is
characteristic of quality filigree…

Janet in Jerusalem


#13

Hi Ros, I asked about this a couple of years ago on Ganoksin, and got
quite a few replies. Search the archives. I had the impression that
several members WERE using it successfully. I tried it a couple of
times and had mixed results. It does seem to be the hardest problem
for me, holding small pieces for soldering that is.

Todd Welti
www.livingcoloropals.com


#14
Another thing about the superglue is apparently the fumes that are
made when its heated are about as toxic as you can get. 

I’d imagine there are far more dangerous fumes to be had in the
average jewelry workshop. I’m not a chemist but I guessed that
cyanide in my stripping solution ain’t quite the same as that
allegedly found in Super Glue. I went off searching and found this:
http://www.ca-plus.com/faq.html From the above, “Cyanoacrylates or
their fumes are not carcinogenic and cyanoacrylates are not made from
cyanide.” (There’s an excellent “first aid” section linked within
that faq)


#15
Super glue has more uses than than, too numerous to describe.
Prior to super glue, goldsmith were using shellac for the same
purpose. Super glue is simply more convenient. If vapors a concern,
it can be dissolve in acetone. As far as soldering, super glue is
used in preparation for soldering. In some situation it is easier
to assemble with super glue and then secure it with binding wire or
plaster of paris. Super glue does not interfere with solder flow. 

Maybe we were using different formulations of superglue; I have
found that it leaves a layer of soot on my piece that impedes solder
flow.

I do like the idea of tacking things together with it and then using
binding wire or plaster or some such to jig for the final soldering-
I’ll have to try that with some of my trickier pieces. Thanks!

Amanda Fisher


#16
I tried it a couple of times and had mixed results. 

Super Glue is not an easy glue. This is mainly because is works best
in the absence of air, i.e. when you have a super tight
connection. It is not a filler glue. So, for “approximate glueing”,
and this is everything that does not tightly fit and has a
sufficient contact surface, Super Glue is a not-so-good choice. In
such a situation, one would probably be better off using some epoxy
kind of glue.


#17
Maybe we were using different formulations of superglue; I have
found that it leaves a layer of soot on my piece that impedes
solder flow. 

I am using glue with following wording on the label “Hot Stuff
Original Cyanoacrylate Adhesive Instant Glue” At first when you heat
it leave yellow stain, continue heating and stain turns to black,
continue heating and black disappears leaves clean metal.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#18

Cyanoacrylate, when burned, may produce toxic fumes. You should
note, however, that if you are concerned for your health, you will
already have in place a ventilation system to remove fumes from your
soldering area. I also use a good mask to protect from those fumes
and particulates generated while polishing and grinding. One thing
for sure–though the suffix cyano is in the name for superglue, you
will not find any cyanide there. The setting up of cyanoacrylate
glue is an exthermic reaction which means that it generates heat on
its own. The irritation some people notice when using the glue is due
to the fact that the heat vaporizes a bit of the glue and it
irritates the eyes, etc. The amount is so small, however that it is
considered harmless. The glue is good for repairing split
fingernails, for closing incisions in surgery and for sticking you to
your workbench if you spill it. The general rule for the fumes you
encounter in making jewelry is to protect yourself. It wont hurt you
if you don’t get it in you. If you don’t need the glue to work
effectively, then, dont use it. If you feel it makes things easier
and you are breathing space and that of others nearby are protected,
then, by all means, use it. GLV


#19
Filigree bits should be held in place by tension so that when
lifted in the air BEFORE soldering, no parts will fall out! If any
parts need to be glued in place, it means the item will not have
the structural integrity required to last over time which is
characteristic of quality filigree..... 

Um, OK. Whatever works for you!

The filigree I use this technique with, by the way, is then used in
plique-a-jour enameling, which has somewhat different requirements
than straight filigree (though I admit I didn’t make that clear in my
initial comment).

When i do straight filigree, the bits are tension-fit. I agree that
the gluing approach doesn’t work well for pure filigree, but it has
proven successful for me and others for many plique-a-jour
frameworks, where the brittleness of the necessary solder is another
big issue.

Amanda Fisher


#20
Original Cyanoacrylate Adhesive Instant Glue" At first when you
heat it leave yellow stain, continue heating and stain turns to
black, continue heating and black disappears leaves clean metal. 

don’t inhale the fume, must have exhaust or filtered face
mask,dave