Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Scotch Stones


#1

Hey, gang, a while back there was a lengthy discussion on scotch
stones and the fact that no one seemed to know where they could
be purchased, particularly in the US. Well, while on a visit to
Philadelphia this past week I popped into a couple of places on
Jewelry Row and found a new supplier who kindly gave me a
catalog. When I got the time to go through the catalog, there
they were, scotch stones, 5" long and available in 6 different
sizes, 3/16" to 1". The suppliers info is:

Philadelphia Findings & Tools Co.
809 Sansom St.
Philadelphia, PA 19107

800-333-1963
215-922-2883
Fax 215-922-3808

Hope this helps out anyone still interested in these finishing
stones.
Susan

C Gems
Original Designs and Period Jewelry
@C_Gems


#2
Hope this helps out anyone still interested in these finishing
stones.

Thanks Susan! My very first instructor raved about these and
then told us we probably wouldn’t be able to get them because
the factory burnt down.

Thanks again,

Kathie


#3

Called Philadelpia Tools this am after see the posting. “yes,
they are in the catalog, no I don’t have any, nor have they been
around in years”

They are great for removing scratches in metal.

Hording the little pieces I have left.

WBR
@WILLIAM_I_EISENBERG


#4

Hey, gang, a while back there was a lengthy discussion on
scotch stones …

Apparently I, too, am not getting all of my mail! And I’m not
even on AOL!!

I hate to ask this, but … What is a ‘scotch stone’?

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>


#5
They are great for removing scratches in metal.
Hording the little pieces I have left.

Well, now I know what they are (were) good for, but what ARE
(WERE) they? How would I recognize one if I met it in a dark
alley?

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>


#6

I think it was me who started the discussion about Scotch (water
of Ayr) stones. I have located a supplier in the UK who will
supply these stones but only in large blocks at around A325.00
+VAT. You US folks will have to do the conversion to dollars.
Does this company in Philadelphia do mail order out side the US.
I have also located an excellent tool suppier in the UK. If
anyone wants their adress. Please mail me back. Richard W UK


#7

In a message dated 97-08-13 22:25:26 EDT, you write:

    They are great for removing scratches in metal. Hording the
little pieces I have left. Well, now I know what they are
(were) good for, but what ARE (WERE) they?  How would I
recognize one if I met it in a dark alley?

If you met them in an alley they would be wearing a kilt!
(Kidding . . . I haven’t a clue as to what they look like either
. . .)


#8

A Scotch stone is a Water of Ayre stone. It’s a natural stone
from Scotland used for finishing silver and gold. It gets file
marks and scratches out very quickly. Water is used as a
lubricant. Unfortunately it is very difficult to get now because
of lack of demand. Who mines it I don’t know. Richard W UK


#9
If you met them in an alley they would be wearing a kilt!
(Kidding . . . I haven't a clue as to what they look like either
. . .)

LOL =-) Hi!

Well–I saw one once! (not in an alley tho) It reminded me of a
charcoal drawing stick–just imagine a square grey piece of
chalk–only much harder and smooth.

Kathie


#10

Water of Ayre stones are natural stone presumably from Ayre in
Scotland. They usually come in pieces about 4" long, half an
inch square. Mid grey in colour. Only problem is I can’t get
hold of any. Richard W UK


#11

Help!

I hope someone can enlighten me.

Do/did scotch stones come in different grits, if yes, what are
they? If no about what grit would you estimate they are, 400,
600, 1200 etc; fine, medium & coarse won’t do?

TIA for the help.

Dave


#12
 Well--I saw one once! (not in an alley tho) It reminded me of
a charcoal drawing stick--just imagine a square grey piece of
chalk--only much harder and smooth. 

After reading other’s discriptions of this stuff, it makes me
think that I should have some of this around my work area!!!

How much different is Ayers Stone from say . . . a glass
brush??? I’ve heard (never used) glass brushes are also good at
taking scratches out.


#13
If you met them in an alley they would be wearing a kilt! >  
<snip> LOL =-)   Hi! <snip>

Ach, lass, bu’ than soo mighcht I!

Well--I saw one once! (not in an alley tho) It reminded me of a
charcoal drawing stick--just imagine a square grey piece of
chalk--only much harder and smooth. 

The various descriptions I have gotten remind me, due to
someone’s suggestion, of a hard Arkansas stone, or of hard slate,
also found in the same areas of Arkansas. I will likely go to the
stone and mineral show in Mt. Ida, AR, in October, so I’ll see if
I can get myself some small slips (shaped sharpening stones) as a
substitute, so I can try it! I have some black Arkansas stones,
but they are too large for most things of this sort. I’d love to
send a piece of the Arkansas stone or slate to someone who knows
what Scotch stones are (were?) like, for comparison. More in
October!!

<> Marrin T. Fleet <>
<> MFleet@cc.memphis.edu <>
<> SCT Corp. in adminstration of: <>
<> Admin. Computing Services <>
<> The University of Memphis <>
<> Memphis, TN 38152 <>
<> 901-678-3604 <>


#14

I don’t think that Water of Ayre stones are the same as Arkansas
stones. They are quite soft stones. Aren’t Arkansas stones man
made? Richard W UK


#15

I have a Scotch Stone and an Arkansas Stone and they are
different. The Scotch stone looks coarser and softer and works
about like a med fine (don’t hold me to it) sandpaper. The
Arkansas Stone is a good slip for fine sharpening your tools
after grinding or using a coarse whetstone. I tend to use the
silicone wheels in my handpiece instead of the Scotch Stone, but
I don’t do a lot of fabrication, just some stonesetting and
cleaning up castings.


#16

No they don’t come in different grits. They are pretty much the
same with some very slight variation. They are used basically
the same as a buffing stick, except that they mould to the
surface. Richard W UK


#17

A Water of Ayre stone is quite soft and leaves a very matt
surface ready for polishing. It will mould itself to the surface
during use. Water is used as a lubricant. I don’t think it has
the same effect as a glass brush. Richard W UK


#18

Talked to Eleanor Moty who introduced me to the Scotch stones.
She said that ALLCRAFT was selling them for $18 at the SNAG
conference. She also told me that she was in England this summer
and purchased a bunch of them for her classes at a store called
Sutters." The stone were not cheap–almost $10.00 for the 1" x 3"
x 3/8" but that is still better than Allcraft charging $18.00 for
the 1/4" sq. by 6". -Eleanor… So guys they are available –
How much are you willing to do to get some. Good luck…

Keith - she says HI

Joan


#19

Scotch stones are traditionally used by enamelists to smooth off
their finished enamel/cloisonn� pieces. Suggest you contact a
(glass) enamel and enameling tools supplier such as Thompson in
Kentucky. They carried them last year!

hale
Hale Sweeny
@Hale_Sweeny
Administrator, Lapidary Digest Mail List
Durham, NC


#20
A Water of Ayre stone is quite soft and leaves a very matt
surface ready for polishing. It will mould itself to the
surface during use. Water is used as a lubricant. I don't think
it has the same effect as a glass brush. 

But, GLASS BRUSH leaves a matt finish, so you are saying that
Water of Ayre (aka Scotch Stone) leaves more scratches???