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New store design


#1

i am designing my new store. it is in a stand alone building on a
very busy intersection. i was wondering what thoughts people had
about the placement of my workspace. i do repairs and custom work. i
have two options. the first one is to put the workspace in the back
room with a oneway window looking on to the showroom. this back room
has no windows. the second is to put the workspace near the front
door. this would give me a nice big window to work next to. i
personally would pick the window, my only concern is that it is only
a few feet from the entry to the show room. this might be a security
risk. i have never seen someones work space close to an entry door
and im wondering if there is a reason for that. does anyone have any
feelings about this?


#2

I’d place it near the entry – and a side door opening only from the
inside right in the workspace. But then I don’t sit with my back to
the door in a restaurant either.


#3

I think GIA has some opinions about work shop and show room space in
the ir comprehensive studies for students and professionals.
Personally I would ask them or check what they have to say about
this. I have done the set up where the shop is visible to the public
( The Goldsmith Bowl ) and the set up where the customers do not see
you working. I now feel much better working out of view In private,
you have the peace of work space which allows a calmer and less
pressured environment to do a nice job. My best success has occurred
after my most recent remodel of the showroom intended to wow upon
entry, the customers who are interested can be invited to tour the
shop.

goo


#4

I have a good friend whose old store was set up with his bench
behind one of the front windows. He used to waste far too much time
looking out the window- the view was indeed pretty good. Just a
thought. Good luck with the new store!

Allan


#5

When my husband was in architecture school in the 70’s he designed a
jewelry shop with a round window into the floor below. A waist high
wall surrounded the window so that the viewers’ field of vision would
be limited to the single anvil in the workshop below. It looked nice
even when no one was forging

Louise