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Morre's disks


#1

Was: Tricks of the trade

If you've never used a Moore's disk (or other snap on sanding
disk), you're really missing something. These are indespensible.
They're little sanding disks, about 1 inch in diameter, that snap
onto a special mandrel the fits in your handpiece. Moore's is the
most popular brand, but there are others. Just check the tool
catalogs, you can't miss them. They have a little brass gromet in
the center with a square hole, and the mandrell has a springy split
end with a square socket that snaps into the disk. You can sand all
kinds of small parts, and they come in different grits. I barely
touch a sanding stick any more. 

Yes, those little sanding discs are wonderful.

I have been making my bracelets for channel inlay for 20 years -
someone suggested I have them cast, but I like creating them. To
shape the bracelets I use a hardwood Ax Handle. Much more forgiving
than the metal mandrel.

By the way, I was hoping to meet Rick@ Rocky Mountain at the CoMA
meeting in Salida over the past weekend. I believe you are now a
member of the board. Super!

Rose Marie Christison


#2

Orchidians, Orchiders, or Orchidites,

The Moore’s brand disks are available in Adalux, Cuttle, Emery,
Garnet, Waterproof, Adalux Plastic, Garnet Plastic and Sand Plastic,
as well as small, large, fine, medium and coarse. Do any of you have
favorites that you keep stocked or recommend?

Thanks so much for your help,
Jamie


#3
The Moore's brand disks are available in Adalux, Cuttle, Emery,
Garnet, Waterproof, Adalux Plastic, Garnet Plastic and Sand
Plastic, as well as small, large, fine, medium and coarse. Do any
of you have favorites that you keep stocked or recommend? 

I keep several big boxes (12 small boxes of 50) on hand all the time
in all three grits of the Adalox (aluminium oxide). I preferr the
paper backed disks as opposed to the plastic ones. Pros and cons
about each. The plastic versions are stonger and more flexible than
the paper (in my experience) but at twice the price. The abrasive
wears about the same reguardless of the backing. They never ever run
true, but knowing this you can accomodate or trim with a razor while
spinning or rub on a diamond file.

Been using these disks for about 15 years and I have absolutly no
complaints about them. Also stock up on mandrels too. Once you find
out the cool things you can do with them, they are great time savers.

P@
www.patpruitt.com


#4

Jamie,

Again, this depends on the work you are doing. Think of a recipe for
cooking. I need to add vinegar for a salad dressing. Do I add cider
vinegar, wine vinegar, tarragon vinegar, rice wine vinegar,
distilled white vinegar, etc.

All the choices in jewelry fabrication tools are completely
dependent on what you are creating. I’m sure you will get lots of
answers to everyone’s favorites, but the is only useful
if the context of the tool is linked with the

And, I like rice wine vinegar and distilled white vinegar, as I like
to cook Asian dishes.

-k


#5

Noel,

And what do you use a Morre's disk for? 

I put the worn moores disk against my diamond disk, I use for shaping
rubber wheels, and cut the moores disk down until you are in good
material.

Rodney