Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

More torch talk


#1

Hi all,

I have, successfully for many years, used a plain one tank propane
torch for soldering. I have a Little Torch two tank setup but I
generally need more heat.

I’ve been teaching small classes using a Map Pro torch with propane
(and I liked it a lot) but was just informed they had been recalled.
In the meantime, I was curious if you use a one tank torch, and if
you teach with one, what do you use?

Thanks as always, and Happy Prosperous New Year!
Karen


#2

I just found out the torch head was not affected, just cylinders of
mapp gas. I’m still curious though what else is being used.

Thanks,
K.


#3

I use the regular Acetylene tank (for plumbers!) and the Prestolite
handle and tips. I have used it in my studio for 40 years and teach
with it entirely. I haven’t the temperament to use the little torch,
burned up a lot of gold with the thing!

Hope that helps!
Rose Marie Christison


#4
if you use a one tank torch, and if you teach with one, what do
you use? 

My teaching torch, and my own for many years, were SilverSmith
acetylene/air. It is a good torch, and will work just fine for
almost anything. The Meco propane/oxy I use now allows an even
greater range of control, and I switched when I took a fusing class
with Marnie Ryan at Revere, I found the kind of controlled fusing if
thin sterling that we learned there very difficult with the Smith.
But, honestly, I think I just wanted a new toy…

I like my Meco a lot, but the Smith (NOT the little torch) is a
terrific workhorse torch. That’s with acetylene. I’ve never used
propane and air.

Noel


#5

I have a Little Torch that I have been using for about 3 years. I
purchased a rosette wand with it. With this tool I can heat most
pieces. I also use a self igniting forced air torch I purchased at
Ace Hardware recently for under $30.00 (it came with a bottle of
propane). I really like it. If I am only annealing I do not bother
to set up the Little Torch. Little Torch now has developed Y
connectors that make it possible to set up a two torches. I am
considering doing this in the near future as I like to do small
sculpture & boxes as well as jewelry.

Regards, Rita


#6

Karen, I believe it is only the Map/Pro that has experienced a
voluntary recall. Worthington is manufacturing new canisters of
Map/Pro. You’ll be able to distinguish the new from the old by the
black diamond shape that is near the neck of the Map/Pro canister.

Barbara Lewis
http://www.paintingwithfireartwear.com


#7

Hi Karen,

Currently I use a one tank Acetylene torch that I love. I also have a
large dual oxy/propane set up for my glass work. I can do a ton of
different things with both. I would eventually like to get the
little smith oxy/propane, which is on my "most important wish list"
of tools, so I can get in fast & hot on tiny items close to stones. I
learned how to solder with the basic acetylene set up for most items
and it’s wide range of capabilities has served me well.

Teresa


#8

Thank you everyone for your ideas and suggestions. Yes, Barbara
you’re right. I’ve been in touch with Worthington and they’ve been
very helpful concerning the recall. Orchid has come through once
again!

Cheers!


#9

Hello Karen,

You use propane and you admit it!!! You are brave!!! Propane seems to
be four letter word in the jewelry community although this seems to
be changing thankfully.

I used to use a propane atmospheric air hose torch by Bernz-O-Matic
which I loved!!! I could melt two ounces of silver for alloying, which
was perfect for me!!! Back when MAPP gas was actually MAPP gas, I
could melt more!!!

Then they discontinued the torch and mine wore out!!!

I miss that torch!!!

I haven’t been able to find anything similar since.

A good little torch for small to medium jobs is this one talked
about by Melissa Muir.

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1bg

Melissa is a great person, who loves working with metal and is a
great teacher!!!

Sometimes they are available at Bed Bath and Beyond for like $30
minus 20% with a coupon!!!

Take Care,
Kenneth


#10
I used to use a propane atmospheric air hose torch by
Bernz-O-Matic which I loved!!! I could melt two ounces of silver
for alloying, which was perfect for me!!! Back when MAPP gas was
actually MAPP gas, I could melt more!!! 

Are you talking about the wonderful JTH-7? A brilliant piece of kit.

This is their current replacement :-

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1n9

Don’t know if it’s any good, but I would buy one if I needed
another. Based on the performance of my JTH-7.

MAPP gas, yeah I liked it too when it “was” MAPP gas. Although
propane is enough to melt alll precious metals, bar platinum.

Your torch has worn out, is it the regulator that’s buggered up? (Oz
trans: “buggered up” = broken). If it’s another component, you may
be able to salvage it.

Regards Charles A.


#11
You use propane and you admit it!!! You are brave!!! 

I don’t think it requires bravery. It does require attention to
details, to the quality of your equipment and setup, and your
procedures to make sure things are set up right so as to avoid
leaks. I’ve used propane in my shop for close to 30 years now. No
brave admissions needed. Just the statement that I do indeed
understand the dangers, and am very careful with that setup to avoid
them. As with many dangerous things, usually the most dangerous part
is a careless operator.

Peter Rowe


#12

As a new kid in silver smiting, 16 months to date, I am puzzled with
the comment re propane, I work about 2 to 4 hours a day in my
workshop and use only propane, never had any problem with soldering
or melting silver up to 120 gram (4 ounce) Am I missing something?

peter
spain


#13
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/1n9 Don't know if it's any good, but
I would buy one if I needed another. Based on the performance of my
JTH-7. 

I have one of those replacement Bernzomatic torches but I use it
with propane. I bought it because my little butane torch didn’t have
the butt to anneal my bracelet blanks and I can’t decide which
jeweler’s torch I want.

It’s a good torch and has plenty of heat. I really like the trigger
light feature too. No messing with sparkers. The only downside is
that the flame is pretty big so doing things that require a pinpoint
flame are out of the question, at least for me, though admittedly my
soldering technique is under-developed.

Cheree


#14

A year ago I had was too scared to use any dual gas torch.

I still bought one, the Mini-Flam Microtorch II, in the hopes that
someone could tell me how to safely open up the valves of the torch
in the correct order so it wouldn’t blow up when I lit it.

Of course, it was too much of a question to ask on this group, but I
wanted to tell you all that I found a book which had the secret:

Light the damn thing like a one gas torch! Add oxygen after
lighting. (Remove the oxygen before turning off the fuel)

That about right?

I haven’t lit my Miniflam yet, but now I feel like I can.

Andrew Jonathan Fine


#15

Hi Cheree,

The German Precision torch is good value for money. It uses propane
and atmospheric air.

I use my JTH-7 for gross heating jobs like melting metal, although
it’s a good torch for other applications, you can silver solder with
it for plumbing applications. I wouldn’t us it to solder a
bracelet… maybe my solder skills need much to be desired too :wink:

Regards Charles A.


#16
That about right? 

Yup.

Light the fuel gas, adjust for a suitable sized starting flame, then
add oxygen or air to get a good usable flame. Then adjust size or
intensity as needed with either or both fuel and oxy.

By the way, turning on the oxy, you then can’t light it until you
add fuel gas, which is a crap shoot as to whether you’ve then got a
usable mix that you can ignite. Too much oxy, and it won’t light or
will try to light but “pop” (see below) and go out again. More than
enough, well that’s just a variant of your “fuel first” method.

In short, do it wrong, and it basically just won’t light, or won’t
light as easily. Nothing you’ll do in lighting the torch will
actually blow up or damage the torch.

However, when turning it off, if you turn off the fuel first, then
the flame gets sharper and sharper until it goes out, but in going
out (especially with larger torchs and torch tips), you can get a
loud “bang” noise. this is indeed a tiny explosion, but other than
startling you, will do no great harm, unless jumping when being
startled caused something unfortunate to happen. Do this in a
workshop with other people, and you can annoy them. But you will not
have damaged the torch. I’m not sure if the microflame torch will
even produce a large enough flame to get a noticably annoying pop
when extinguished this way. Welding torches, and metal melting
torches, larger soldering torches, yes. Tiny ones, Little torches,
etc, not so much.

Peter


#17

Andrew,

Light the damn thing like a one gas torch! Add oxygen after
lighting. (Remove the oxygen before turning off the fuel) That
about right? I haven't lit my Miniflam yet, but now I feel like I
can. 

I think you got it right.

Light little gas and add O2 to get a flame you like. adjust up I have
been doing this for ever and still don’t reside in a crater in the
ground.

jeffD
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#18

Hi Andrew

Actually I turn off the gas torch in reverse order fuel first so the
flame extinguishes and then the oxygen. This is how I was taught when
I learnt welding many years ago. It was supposed to reduce the risk
of flashback. Interestingly with my jewellery torch (Smiths little
torch) it doesn’t seem to make much difference if I get the order
wrong. Of course I have flashback arrestors on both gas lines.

All the best

Jen


#19

Andrew, You are correct. I was taught a simple way to remember.
Light the gas, then feed it with the oxygen. To turn it off, starve
it by turning off the oxygen, then turn off it gas.

Alma


#20

When I learned I was told to follow GO GO. Gas on, Oxygen on. Gas
Off, Oxygen off. Or simply Gas On, Gas Off. Oxy follows after the
gas has been either turned on or off. Simple to remember.