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Metal Mold and Die Making (Pantograph)


#1

Jeffrey:

Thanks for the polymer tips, I will try them. I have never tried RTV Molds.
Maybe I will give them a shot. I have a pressure washer that hooks to my
air compressor, will this work? Which is best, pressure washing or
ultrasonic, I have both.

The Gorton 3U is not a 3d machine but 2d. The one I have is from the late
40’s. A P1-2 would be more desirable (newer design, and easier and cheaper
to rebuild if necessary), but I have not run into one of those. The 3U goes
down to 16:1 and runs at up to 20,000 rpm. These old machines are truly
incredible, and Gorton is still in business. I needed a collet and collet
nut, and they carry them. They aren’t cheap but I got them. There is a
fellow named Warren there, he is very helpful.

The Pries CG-21 cutter grinder is only about 13 lbs (I was told it is
called a “Mickey Mouse” in the trade). I got it from the Surplus Corner. It
is slightly less accurate as its larger cousins and does not have as much
power. As I understand it, it was developed as a less expensive alternative
to the larger capacity, more accurate, more expensive machines on the
market at the time. Preis is no longer in business. I figure, that since I
am not working for NASA it should work fine for my needs. I have both HSS
and carbide cutters. I just got everything into place about the time I had
to start doing outdoor festivals. So I have not gotten to start working on
a project yet. Very soon though.

Do you know of a good source for the photopolymer material. The only
sources I know of run about $22.00 for 7" X 7".

What type of brass should I use for injection molds? How thick?

Do you have experience with the high pressure plastic injectors?

How much draft does one need to have on metal injection molds for wax
injecting.?

Thanks for the info on Les Williams, I’ll give him a call. I hope he
doesn’t mind answering a few hundred questions. I’ll try to only ask a few
at a time.

Thanks again for your help. When I get some experience under my belt I’ll
let you know what I think of the Pries cutter grinder. At this point my
problem is lack of knowledge and inexperience with engraving. There is a
listing for some pantographs in the current Engraver’s Journal. I think I
saw an ad in one of the internet classifieds for a Gorton 3D machine. If
your interested I’ll look them up for you.

Thanks

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#2

Kenneth Gastineau wrote:

Jeffrey:

Thanks for the polymer tips, I will try them. I have never tried RTV Molds.
Maybe I will give them a shot. I have a pressure washer that hooks to my
air compressor, will this work? Which is best, pressure washing or
ultrasonic, I have both.

The pressure washer will destroy the pattern, you’d have to tone it down
a bit, and warm to hot water works well. The ultrasonic leaves a pebble
like texture which can be very atractive, expecially if sandblasted and
plated with 24k. If you do some experimenting with both, you’ll discover
the many possibilities. The delicate patterns you create can be undercut
by the ultrasonic is you’re not careful.

Do you know of a good source for the photopolymer material. The only
sources I know of run about $22.00 for 7" X 7".

Sorry, I’ve been away from photopolymers for several years now. I do
remember getting some great prices from large print shop suppliers.

What type of brass should I use for injection molds? How thick?

I use aluminum for injection molds, it cuts more easily and is less
expensive.

Do you have experience with the high pressure plastic injectors?

Yes, I have a Morgan Industries 55. I use about 4-5 tons of clamp
pressure and about 12,000 psi of injection pressure. I know it sounds
very high, but platic can be difficult to to move sometimes, especially
on filigree patterns. I got the injector used for $1000. A regular air
compressor at 125psi does the job nicely, the injector increases the
pressure internally.

How much draft does one need to have on metal injection molds for wax
injecting.?

Wax can be tricky, especially on fine lettering and scrolls. I imagine
you’ll want to grind the cutters used for that type of pattern to about
12 degrees or more.

Thanks again for your help. When I get some experience under my belt I’ll
let you know what I think of the Pries cutter grinder. At this point my
problem is lack of knowledge and inexperience with engraving. There is a
listing for some pantographs in the current Engraver’s Journal. I think I
saw an ad in one of the internet classifieds for a Gorton 3D machine. If
your interested I’ll look them up for you.

I hope your used cutter grinder is adequate. I do some very tiny work,
and the cutter needs to be absolutely precise. I went to several shops
until I found one that could grind the cutters to my satisfaction. A
cutter tipped off to .1 or .15mm will break instantly if it’s not true.
No need to locate me a machine, I couldn’t afford it right now. Thanks
anyway! :slight_smile:

Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-469-6250


#3

Jeffrey:

Thanks again for the info. I am going to start working on my first metal
mold soon and I am sure I will have some questions.

How much draft does one need to have on metal injection molds for wax
injecting.?

wax can be tricky, especially on fine lettering and scrolls. I imagine
you’ll want to grind the cutters used for that type of pattern to about
12 degrees or more.

Is the 12 degrees included angle or otherwise?

If everything goes well I will probably be in the market for a plastic
injector. Is there much available used? If so where? What qualities are
desirable?

Can much be done with metal molds and standard pressurized wax injectors?

Thanks.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#4

Kenneth Gastineau wrote:

wax can be tricky, especially on fine lettering and scrolls. I imagine
you’ll want to grind the cutters used for that type of pattern to about
12 degrees or more.

Is the 12 degrees included angle or otherwise?

Not owning a cutter grinder, I forget the exact difference between
included and simple, maybe included angles are roughly double simple
angels? Anyway, you need to have enough release to let go of the wax,
it’s pretty weak. And by the way, most of the shops I know of inject
carving wax into metal molds in a vacuum chamber, ik’s kind of an
expensive setup and not sold anymore. You’d have to find a used one or
make your own. That’s why I stick to plastic and aluminum molds. The old
timers make their molds by pressing the engraved master into a soft
metal like type metal or Cerratrue (sp?). They then do further engraving
in the soft metal. I can get into this another time.

If everything goes well I will probably be in the market for a plastic
injector. Is there much available used? If so where? What qualities are
desirable?

Good luck finding a used injector, I know there’s some sources, I got
lucky. I think the easiest injectors to use are the ones that hold the
mold vertically with a clamp. On mine the mold sits on a platen and I
have to put a sprue (gate) through the center of the mold instead of
creating like a rubber mold (split in half).

Can much be done with metal molds and standard pressurized wax injectors?

I’ve heard that some guys do this, but I never had any success with good
detail fill-out myself.

Thanks.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net

orchid@ganoksin.com

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-472-9830


#5

Jeffrey:

Thanks again for the info. I assume you mean the angle cut into the mold
should be 12 degrees.

What is the best way to polish metal molds after engraving them? I have a
fexible shaft and also a air powered handpiece (500,000 rpm).

What types of stones or burrs should be used?

Is hand stoning recommended?

I have seen some wax injectors that are used in Universities. The air
powered ones are priced around $1600 new. They look like they would work
for jewelry and they hold the mold vertically. The ones in the jewelry
catalogs are $3000 and up (ouch). I’m going to check one out and see if
they work when I get a mold made. There is a local University that will let
me try one.

I have heard of pressing masters into soft metal and also casting it around
the master. Sound interesting, anytime you have the time to explain, I
would certainly be interested.

Have you thought about writing a book about metal molds? There are none
available and one of the major jewelry equipment suppliers might see it as
just the thing they need to promote more plastic injectors. I have heard
that there are some simple ways to make simple molds with soft mold metal.
I know of one major supplier that wanted the company that makes their
plastic injectors to produce a book showing some simple ways to make some
metal molds. They refused to do it because they also make metal molds and
they figured it would hurt their business. I think it would help their
business. It would get more jewelers to using metal molds in the first
place and they would probably end up wanting more complicated molds than
they could make themselves. Go figure.

I am thankful there are people such as yourself Jeffrey that are willing to
share their hard earned Thanks again.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net

From: Jeffrey Everett jeverett@lisco.com
To: orchid@ganoksin.com
Subject: Re: Metal Mold and Die Making (Pantograph).
Date: Saturday, October 12, 1996 1:55 AM

Kenneth Gastineau wrote:

wax can be tricky, especially on fine lettering and scrolls. I imagine
you’ll want to grind the cutters used for that type of pattern to
about

12 degrees or more.

Is the 12 degrees included angle or otherwise?

Not owning a cutter grinder, I forget the exact difference between
included and simple, maybe included angles are roughly double simple
angels? Anyway, you need to have enough release to let go of the wax,
it’s pretty weak. And by the way, most of the shops I know of inject
carving wax into metal molds in a vacuum chamber, ik’s kind of an
expensive setup and not sold anymore. You’d have to find a used one or
make your own. That’s why I stick to plastic and aluminum molds. The old
timers make their molds by pressing the engraved master into a soft
metal like type metal or Cerratrue (sp?). They then do further engraving
in the soft metal. I can get into this another time.

If everything goes well I will probably be in the market for a plastic
injector. Is there much available used? If so where? What qualities are
desirable?

Good luck finding a used injector, I know there’s some sources, I got
lucky. I think the easiest injectors to use are the ones that hold the
mold vertically with a clamp. On mine the mold sits on a platen and I
have to put a sprue (gate) through the center of the mold instead of
creating like a rubber mold (split in half).

Can much be done with metal molds and standard pressurized wax
injectors?

I’ve heard that some guys do this, but I never had any success with good
detail fill-out myself.

Thanks.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-472-9830

orchid@ganoksin.com

procedures


#6

Re: Jeffery:

Have you thought about writing a book about metal molds? (snip)

I am thankful there are people such as yourself Jeffrey that are willing to
share their hard earned Thanks again.

Kenneth Gastineau

Me too kenneth,

Jeffery, I second the idea of writing it down, a hint, get a small tape
recorder, talk into it while working when you adoing interesting things,
have someone type it in (transcribe) it into your computer, then it is just
’stuff’ to compose with, You’ll find your talking voice works well when
written.

Be glad to sharre my experiences self-publishing. It is easier now than
before and there’s a real groundswell of small publishers who can make it
in new ways, besides sharing and imporoving the field you might make some
money. In the form of residuals, that is that work is work, with writing
you get some back forever, not just when the client buys the piece.

Charles

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M
Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7
Canada

tel: 403-263-3955
fax: 403-283-9053
Email: @Charles_Lewton-Brain


#7

Charles Lewton-Brain wrote:

Your prompting has encourage me to continue work on my book which I started about a year ago. I have about 40 pages dones but need to do many descriptive photos which put a kink in my progress. I really appreciate your input! Thanks

Jeffrey Everett

Re: Jeffery:

Have you thought about writing a book about metal molds? (snip)

I am thankful there are people such as yourself Jeffrey that are willing to
share their hard earned Thanks again.

Kenneth Gastineau

Me too kenneth,

Jeffery, I second the idea of writing it down, a hint, get a small tape
recorder, talk into it while working when you adoing interesting things,
have someone type it in (transcribe) it into your computer, then it is just
’stuff’ to compose with, You’ll find your talking voice works well when
written.

Be glad to sharre my experiences self-publishing. It is easier now than
before and there’s a real groundswell of small publishers who can make it
in new ways, besides sharing and imporoving the field you might make some
money. In the form of residuals, that is that work is work, with writing
you get some back forever, not just when the client buys the piece.

Charles

Brain Press
Box 1624, Ste M
Calgary, Alberta, T2P 2L7
Canada

tel: 403-263-3955
fax: 403-283-9053
Email: brainnet@cadvision.com

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-472-9830


#8

Kenneth Gastineau wrote:

Jeffrey:

What is the best way to polish metal molds after engraving them? I have a
fexible shaft and also a air powered handpiece (500,000 rpm).

Aluminum polishes very nicely, I just use my jewelry polishing supplies,
I texture the backgrounds and so on. I try to create patterns that DON’T
require extensive finishing, most of the polishing can be done on the
casting. The tool marks are mostly left on what will be the raised
surfaces of the casting… Steel molds for stamping or aluminum molds
for injecting finished plastic parts for end users are where the
polishing work comes in. That’s one of the reasons I prefer to stay away
from steel dies, they’re a pain… Gesswein has a catalogue for die
engravers that contains a huge assortment of stones and ultrasonic
handpieces etc… that are invaluable to die finishers.

What types of stones or burrs should be used?

If I HAVE to stone an aluminum molds, I generally use a scotch stone, I
NEVER NEVER use a bur on a finished mold, I only screw it up!

Is hand stoning recommended?

Only if I have to… :slight_smile:

I have seen some wax injectors that are used in Universities. The air
powered ones are priced around $1600 new. They look like they would work
for jewelry and they hold the mold vertically. The ones in the jewelry
catalogs are $3000 and up (ouch). I’m going to check one out and see if
they work when I get a mold made. There is a local University that will let
me try one.

The relationship of the clamp pressure and ram pressure determines the
size of the mold (surface area of the engraved portion) you can inject.
On the small air powered machine you will be restricted to fairly small
patterns. Something the size of a belt buckle would probably force the
mold open. I know one shop that has machined solid clamps to hold the
mold closed in this case. I’d be interested in getting some information
about the small injector. I do some industrial pattern making that ties
up my Morgan Press and I have to purge it before I can do jewelry
work…

I have heard of pressing masters into soft metal and also casting it around
the master. Sound interesting, anytime you have the time to explain, I
would certainly be interested.

Have you thought about writing a book about metal molds? There are none
available and one of the major jewelry equipment suppliers might see it as
just the thing they need to promote more plastic injectors. I have heard
that there are some simple ways to make simple molds with soft mold metal.
I know of one major supplier that wanted the company that makes their
plastic injectors to produce a book showing some simple ways to make some
metal molds. They refused to do it because they also make metal molds and
they figured it would hurt their business. I think it would help their
business. It would get more jewelers to using metal molds in the first
place and they would probably end up wanting more complicated molds than
they could make themselves. Go figure.

I’m now in the process of writing that book, guess I should finish it…

Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K and platinum gemstone jewelry. Fine die
and mold engraving. Diamond setting. Class rings/pins.
25 years experience in the jewelry trade. 515-469-6250


#9

Jeffrey:

The injector is available from

Delvies plastics inc.
P.O. Box 651043
133 West Haven Avenue
Salt Lake City, Utah 84165
800-533-5843 Outside Utah
801-467-1548 Inside Utah
801-467-1540 FAX

#110A Megratron
1.1 Oz. Shot. Requires 100 psi. This machine is air powered.

$1600.00

They also have a hand operated one with a 2/3 oz shot. $775.00.

Well you’ve got me excited about your book. By all means finish it. Another
approach is to produce a series of videos.

As usual, thanks for the info.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#10

Charles Lewton-Brain wrote:

Me too kenneth,

Jeffery, I second the idea of writing it down, a hint, get a small tape
recorder, talk into it while working when you adoing interesting things,
have someone type it in (transcribe) it into your computer, then it is just
’stuff’ to compose with, You’ll find your talking voice works well when
written.

Be glad to sharre my experiences self-publishing. It is easier now than
before and there’s a real groundswell of small publishers who can make it
in new ways, besides sharing and imporoving the field you might make some
money. In the form of residuals, that is that work is work, with writing
you get some back forever, not just when the client buys the piece.

Thanks Charles, I’m currently stumped at about page 40. I think I need
about 1-200 photographs depicting all the things I’m writing about.
You’ve done such a marvelous job self publishing, I’d apprecieate any
input you have.

Thanks!

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#11

Tis True,

Better yet! Volunteer to teach a 2/3/4 night class on ‘whatever’(Continuing
education, Senior Ed, Etc.) record, draft, organize, in final, and even if
you have to publish yourself . . Wah la, goes in the Resume as DAS BOOK,
author …

Therefore, you are worth more to the Brazilians!!!

Jim

At 02:55 PM 10/12/96 -0600, you wrote:


#12

Tis True!

Better yet, Volunteer to do a FREE(Well, maybe Almost!) for volunteer
education at the local college program(Senior Ed, Whatever!) as an evening
class , for several nights . . tape, draft, organize, Wall Ah! Das Book!

Even if YOU have to publish it, goes in the RESUME! . . as needed>

Worth more money to the Brazilians!

Jim

At 02:55 PM 10/12/96 -0600, you wrote:


#13

Jim Chambers wrote:

Tis True!

Better yet, Volunteer to do a FREE(Well, maybe Almost!) for volunteer
education at the local college program(Senior Ed, Whatever!) as an evening
class , for several nights . . tape, draft, organize, Wall Ah! Das Book!

Even if YOU have to publish it, goes in the RESUME! . . as needed>

Worth more money to the Brazilians!

Jim

At 02:55 PM 10/12/96 -0600, you wrote:

Why should I teach for free when they pay me $22.50/hr?

Actually Jim, I don’t quite understand the point you’re getting at.

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#14

I’m currently stumped at about page 40. I think I
need about 1-200 photographs depicting all the things I’m writing
about…

Dear Jeffrey,

How about publishing parts of your book within our site? I will
be happy to contribute the bandwidth!

Please contact me if you are interested.

Best
Dr. E. Aspler
Managing Director
Ganoksin Jewelry Co.,Ltd.
aspler@ganoksin.com


#15

We were discussing methods of creating a book other than just sitting down
and 'beating it out!..

I have done a bit of training . . If you want to ‘do’ a book on a
particular topic . . .then create an outline for a course… offer it to
your local Senior Education outlets, local Universities, Colleges for
Continued Ed programs, etc. … these programs usually can’t afford to pay
very much… IE… $18/22 per hour… but that’s 'better than nothing’
especially when your real intent is to record, draft and publish a book
anyway… this way you pick up money to pay for gas,handout, etc… PLUS
… Good For the 'Old Resume", for those that have a need, you become an
Associate(whatever they are called in you location) Professor of the
University, College…

Jim

At 08:34 PM 10/13/96 -0500, you wrote:


#16

JIm, thanks for explaining to this old airhead… :slight_smile: It is a wonderful
idea, I have been asked by at least two colleges to give seminars, great
opportunity!

Jim Chambers wrote:

We were discussing methods of creating a book other than just sitting down
and 'beating it out!..

I have done a bit of training . . If you want to ‘do’ a book on a
particular topic . . .then create an outline for a course… offer it to
your local Senior Education outlets, local Universities, Colleges for
Continued Ed programs, etc. … these programs usually can’t afford to pay
very much… IE… $18/22 per hour… but that’s 'better than nothing’
especially when your real intent is to record, draft and publish a book
anyway… this way you pick up money to pay for gas,handout, etc… PLUS
… Good For the 'Old Resume", for those that have a need, you become an
Associate(whatever they are called in you location) Professor of the
University, College…

Jim

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#17

Jeffrey:

I have a question about cutting tool steel with a pantograph and a carbide
tip. When doing delicate work, what depth of cut is best to prevent
breaking the point of the cutter? Does .002" sound about right or can more
be taken off at one time? I started making my first die, everything was
going great till I started trying to take deeper cuts (.005"). Impatience
does it everytime, heh. I’m sure I’ll make every mistake possible at least
once.

Also are there any books on mold finishing and or mold making that you
would recommend? I’ve seen several in Gesswein. What I mean is do you know
if they would provide relative to making molds for jewelry.

I tried your suggestion about using the ultrasonic cleaner on the
photopolymers. With the metal backed material it is a little too aggressive
on the outer perimeter and didn’t work too well (cured polymer parts came
loose from the metal backing). I tried using a toothbrush and then used the
ultrasonic to clean out the remaining material in the corners and crevices
and it worked great. Got the best results ever, clean crisp detail. This
should also help prevent contamination and breakdown of the rubbermolds.

Thanks

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#18

Jeffrey:

I have a question about cutting tool steel with a pantograph and a carbide
tip. When doing delicate work, what depth of cut is best to prevent
breaking the point of the cutter? Does .002" sound about right or can more
be taken off at one time? I started making my first die, everything was
going great till I started trying to take deeper cuts (.005"). Impatience
does it everytime, heh. I’m sure I’ll make every mistake possible at least
once.

The depth of cut depends largely on two parameters; the size you tip off
the cutter at, and the feed rate, how fast you’re trying to move the
cutter through the material. With hard materials, you’ll need to move
the bit very slowly, about 1mm per second or less, and have a very high
spindle speed, and don’t forget a proper lubricant. What I don’t
understand is why you’re cutting tool steel! I use aluminum for molds.
Are you using super micrograin carbide cutters?

Also are there any books on mold finishing and or mold making that you
would recommend? I’ve seen several in Gesswein. What I mean is do you know
if they would provide relative to making molds for jewelry.

I’ve never seen one book on mold engraving or mold finishing, I guess
I’ll have to take another look at the Gesswein die makers catalog, maybe
I missed something there.

         Jeffrey Everett

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone fine jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Cad jewelry design, cad/cam milling scroll filigree…
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#19

Jeffry wrote:

The depth of cut depends largely on two parameters; the size you tip off
the cutter at, and the feed rate, how fast you’re trying to move the
cutter through the material. With hard materials, you’ll need to move
the bit very slowly, about 1mm per second or less, and have a very high
spindle speed, and don’t forget a proper lubricant. What I don’t
understand is why you’re cutting tool steel! I use aluminum for molds.
Are you using super micrograin carbide cutters?

Jeffry:

I’m cutting into annealed tool steel to make what is called an imprinting
die or stamp.
Similar to a coining die but not as sculptured.

I used a 6:1 tracing master. This hopefully helps to slow down the cutter
movement.
I believe the cutter is super micrograin carbide. I got halfway through
engraving the design on the 1" round steel blank before I had any serious
problems. I just don’t have the experience to know when I am screwing up.
The best way to make these dies is to cut them into machinable graphite and
EDM them. I am going to try and find a shop that will do that reasonably.
Until then I guess it is slow and easy.

I am also needing to make injection molds. Just haven’t started that
project yet. I will take your advice and try aluminum.

Thanks.

Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net


#20

To:
Kenneth Gastineau
gastin@mis.net

I have been watching a lot of Email since I join this forum, I am very
hesistant about answering any, but I seen yours and thought I would
share something that I learned. I have been a bench jeweler for the
past 17 years, I do designing, repair, casting, manufacturing, etc…
I can get myself into one to many things sometimes, I spend a great deal
of money buying the best equipment and tools, to get to the point
though, I spent about $300.00 on this “polymer” junk modeler. Did not
get the results that I seen at the Tucson MJSA show where it was
displayed. Called factory, etc… product just can not get fine results.

I designed a non-traditional class ring for a college utilizing their
logo, to begin manufacturing started I started by contacting others in
the large manufacturing of rings, etc… They said to have a metal model
made, so I did. Best advice ever, the company I used was Emblematic
Tool & Design in Cincinnati, OH. They reproduced the very detailed logo
from a laser line drawing print out from my computer. They also
injected the plastic for me, well work the time saved for me. They are
proffessional in what they do. I do repair for 5 stores,so I am very
busy, and could never have reproduced the quality of this companys work.
If you got a high quality item to reproduce check them out, make your
money at the bench.