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Matte finish to white gold


#1

Hello folks…

Your advice is greatly appreciated.

I have a white gold engagement ring (gypsy set diamond polka dot
band) that is beginning to lose it’s matte satin finish through
daily wear.

I was told that there is a type of cloth or fabric that is used
specifically for creating this matte finish.

Does anyone know what this cloth is called and how I can get me
some?

Thanks!
Joanne


#2

Joanne,

If you are trying to do this by hand instead of with a flex shaft or
motor you may be looking for the Scot/Brite pads from 3M. These come
in various grits from fine to coarse. You could also look for a
fiberglass pen. I have one that is from the 1970’s so I am not sure
where you would get them today but you might want to try an office
supply store.

We use to use these on brushed steel watch cases but I prefer the
Scot/Bright pads for jewelry.

Greg DeMark
www.demarkjewelry.com


#3

There’s actually two families of “matte finish”. One is sand
blasting, which requires a sand blaster. That is a scattershot
texture, and if anyone knows how to duplicate it effectively by hand
I’d like to know that, for touchups. The other family is satin
finish, which is linear. There are many satin finish wheels you can
buy, but the old fashioned way is just to use sandpaper (220 or
rougher) carefully so as to get parallel lines. You need to look at
it - if the pattern is scattered like stars in the sky, then it’s
sandblast.

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#4

Hi

The other family is satin finish, which is linear. There are many
satin finish wheels you can buy, but the old fashioned way is just
to use sandpaper (220 or rougher) carefully so as to get parallel
lines. 

I happen to like the matte finish very much. I am concerned, though,
that if I put a matte finish on a piece in this way (I’ve seen the
3m wheels for the flexshaft give an interesting swirly pattern as
well) and the buyer later uses a polishing cloth (or any other
rubbing) to get any tarnish off, that it will change the look of the
matte finish. Is this true?

Also, I bought a piece last night. I have never done this before
(frugal wouldn’t even begin to describe me) but I love it very much.
The entire piece (as well as the neckwire) is blackened sterling. Why
doesn’t the black come off onto someone’s clothing? Has it been
sealed? It doesn’t show any evidence of any type of sealant
anywhere.I am looking for a technical explanation as to why the
patina stays on the piece.

Thanks
Kim


#5

There is a Japanese texturing technique where you pour sharp sand
down onto your work from a height by hand. It seemed to work quite
well,about two feet up, you just keep scooping up the sand and
pouring it on again. Some one posted a link to an old video recently
but I cant find it at the moment.

regards
Tim Blades.


#6

John

That is a scattershot texture, and if anyone knows how to duplicate
it effectively by hand I'd like to know that, for touchups 

There is a wire wheel that you can use with your flexshaft, small
wire wheel with floppy wires, comes in different wire gauges,
reproduces fine to course sandblast look.

Richard Hart


#7

they probably are using black max (from rio) or something similar.
It stays good but lots of rouge will take it off. I did some earrings
with it and they stay nice and black.

Candy


#8
to get any tarnish off, that it will change the look of the matte
finish. Is this true? 

Yes, and something like a rouge cloth can make it look dingy. I tell
people that sandblasted rings lok great in the showcase, but that it
will wear away within months. Most people just let it go…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#9

There is a Japanese texturing technique where you pour sharp sand
down onto your work from a height by hand. you can also put sand and
jewelry in a closed tube (tennis ball tube) and shake to get a light
sandblast texture. just be sure to do this before you set any stones
(except maybe diamond).

Matthew Crawford
www.MatthewDesigns.com


#10

I have found the link, it is shown in Tokyo Silversmithery no5

http://www.tourism.metro.tokyo.jp/english/tra/goods02.html

many thanks to the Orchid member who originally found it

regards
Tim Blades.


#11
the buyer later uses a polishing cloth (or any other rubbing) to
get any tarnish off, that it will change the look of the matte
finish 

Try a drafting eraser, gets inside the little scratches without too
much wear.

I may have missed it if someone suggested it but a toothbrush with
pumice gives a nice random pattern, safe for most stones too. I
suppose if you wanted a subtle linear pattern you could make a
slurry and use a buffing wheel at slow speed.


#12
http://www.tourism.metro.tokyo.jp/english/tra/goods02.html

Fascinating videos!

I am sure he is listed as one of the “Living Treasures” of Japan Does
anyone on Orchid read Japanese? They made a point of showing his
bottles of solutions. Just wondered what they actually were.

jena


#13

to get any tarnish off, that it will change the look of the matte
finish. Is this true?

Yes, and something like a rouge cloth can make it look dingy. I
tell people that sandblasted rings lok great in the showcase, but
that it will wear away within months. Most people just let it go... 

Just like a polished surface becomes scratched and burnished in a
short period of time. All precious metals are soft relative to many
things our hands come in contact with on a day to day basis. So any
finish on a ring will shortly become a burnished finish.

Jim

James Binnion
@James_Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


360-756-6550


#14

Jena,

In the Japanese video, from left to right, they aRe: nitric acid,
methyl alcohol, and hydrochloric acid.

I have never replied to a post on orchid, so we will see tomorrow if
i have done it correctly.

Jon


#15

One trick I’ve used to repair small areas of damage to a sand blasted
finish (careless polishing on a repair ;-). Use a hammer piece with a
bezel type anvil ( slightly domed anvil, corners rounded, polished)
with a piece of sandpaper between it and the metal. Choose the grit
to match and keep moving the sandpaper as it gets finer really
quickly. I generally some how clamp the piece and keep the hammer
slightly high while moving the sandpaper. Practice on polished scrap
first!. And it might get a little tedious on large areas. In terms of
a more durable and lasting sand blast finish I like to hand scratch
brush with soapy water, or rotary tumble with steel for a couple of
minutes.

Jeff
Demand Designs
Analog/Digital Modelling & Goldsmithing
http://www.gmavt.net/~jdemand


#16
bezel type anvil (slightly domed anvil, corners rounded, polished)
with a piece of sandpaper between it and the metal 

Thank you, thank you! It seems so simple, like most good ideas. We
have a sandblaster, but many times there is some touchup needed where
the blasted meets the unblasted, or something… Great method…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com