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Low relief, laser engraved, paper patterns for the rolling mill

Hi,

I ran across an interesting resource…Rolling Mill Resource…thought I would share…

…low relief, laser engraved, paper patterns for the rolling mill

Shop Rolling Mill Resource at Micro-Tools | Micro-Tools

Julie

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Nice! I would use this a lot.

On a similar note, anyone that uses copper or brass and wants something patterned, but doesn’t have a rolling mill;

EDIT: I wonder if you could use these brass sheets to pattern a piece of silver with a mill?

Mark

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yes you can. i have done it. but the patterned sheet is so thin you can only print it once or twice.

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Hi,

i chatted with this resource and was directed to YouTube fir some videos, as I was curious how to use these paper patterns, as well as how to use their foam sheets, and what they are for…

Julie

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p.s the above videos are not by rolling mill resources, and i am not sure what brand of paper is being used…they are just interesting instructional videos on the general concept.

julie

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That might be MetalDesignz.com. In any event that’s another source of textured paper.

Neil A

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I have always used old playing cards to back up my roll printing. I am interested in hearing more about using the foam backers described in one of the posts. Can someone tell me more about them? Thanks…Rob

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MetalDesignz encouraged me to use craft foam as backing for their laser texture paper, so I tried it. The foam bunched up under pressure and moved out of position and messed up the job. Part of the metal had backing, part did not, part had doubled backing… Foam is rubbery and can grab on the roller, or at least it did for me.

Also, I do not see the logic of imprinting by force and using a backing that absorbs / cushions the force you are applying. Maybe it works, maybe some people just think it works, but it makes no sense to me.

I use 90 lb. card stock from Staples. One package will likely last a lifetime and can be used for other things. It also imprints a nice ‘rough granite’ look on the back of the metal, or on both sides if used that way.

Neil A

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Neil…I have printed interesting designs just using masking tape. Thanks for the heads up about foam. It didn’t make sense to me for the same reasons that you mention. Besides, I have a lot of old playing cards that seem to work well…Rob

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I don’t have any playing cards. My wife does like to play Solitaire, so maybe I can borrow one of hers to try that out. :slightly_smiling_face:

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I ordered a sample pack a few months back and have to say the results were fantastic. I was very impressed.
I did follow the directions exactly for use. I have since been distracted by many other projects in the studio, but definitely plan to explore these laser engraved papers more.

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I did order from Rolling Mill resources.

I have ordered from Rolling Mill Resources before, but just spent a few dollars at Metal Designz, Thanks for the tip.

So I got hold of some playing cards from my wife’s Solitaire deck - by asking nicely. Appropriately, she gave me Jokers.

Rob’s idea works well, no surprise there. Where the 90 lb. paper I use could buckle a bit and leave fold lines on the back of a rolled piece, as bad as the card looks after the fact, the back of the metal I rolled has an even, light texture to it - no crinkle lines.

A quick search on Amazon shows cards made with a variety of materials, and cards as large as 5 by 7 inches, so there are options to explore. Thanks for the tip, Rob.

Neil A

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They were there and they worked for me. I am sure that there are many other ways to do this. I also use playing cards as a kind of calibrated shim. As an example, when I am cutting a stone, I like to draw a level line around the edge to use as a grinding guide. I paint the edge of the rough stone with white out. Then I use the cards to elevate either the stone or the pencil to draw the line around the stone at whatever height I want to draw it. Thanks…Rob

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I also use playing cards as a kind of calibrated shim.

That just gave me an idea. Using specific numbers of cards as shims to reset rolling mill gaps. I do have long feeler gauges riveted together at one end, but to get specific settings I have to use thick ones and thinner ones spaced far apart in the stack, not handy. The cards my wife gave me are thinner than other brands, so maybe a collection of different cards, loose instead of bound together like the feeler gauges, would make setting established gaps a lot easier.

Neil A

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They do compress and may not be accurate enough. Why don’t you get some thicker brass or copper sheet and roll pieces to your desired thickness. Now you have set of “go” “ no go” gauges…Rob

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They do compress and may not be accurate enough. Why don’t you get some thicker brass or copper sheet and roll pieces to your desired thickness.

Uh, because I wasn’t smart enough to think of that? :slightly_smiling_face:

Neil A

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Hi Rob,
I use craft foam with cut paper to texture metal in a rolling mill. I cut shapes into old manila file folders (aka, oak tag paper) using an X-acto knife. I sandwich the annealed metal between the cut paper and the craft foam and roll under pressure. The metal is forced through the openings, resulting in polished raised areas within a subtly, textured background from the paper. It’s inexpensive, fun and the patterns are unique to each maker. Charles Lewton-Brain demonstrated the technique; it’s one of his favorite ways to pattern metal.

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