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Large Size Ladies Jewlery


#1

Greetings All!

I am in the process of forming a small company to market “classically
designed” rings and necklaces ( in the low to moderate price range)
to the Ladies “Plus” Size Market.

Just curious as to why there is such a void in this area of the
market? Seems there is a plethora of great designs for the petite to
average size gals but the big gals are forced to choose between this
and the current oversize gaudy stuff such as Delta Berke collection.

Would appreciate anyone’s spin regarding this as to why there is such
a void in this market and any designers and manufacturers that have
expertise in this area.

Many Thanks!


#2

I’m not aware of a void in the market at all. Both rings and
necklaces are standardly available in many sizes and lengths. An 18"
length might be a choker for a large woman for example. Large size
rings are readably available or can be resized. The market also has
a dazzling variety of scales in jewelry design from the petite to the
massive and everything in between - especially in rings and
necklaces. In addition, custom made pieces play a prominent role in
many jewelry outlets and people should have no trouble finding
someone to make what they want, if they know. It’s true that finding
well made, well designed, and fairly priced jewelry which matches
one’s taste and desire is a lifelong challenge, but that’s true for
all consumers large and small.

Tom Kruskal


#3
    Would appreciate anyone's spin regarding this as to why there is
such a void in this market and any designers and manufacturers that
have expertise in this area. 

Probably because society stigmatizes large people and conditions them
to think themselves ugly and unsexy and you just do NOT call
attention to yourself with sparklie jewelry. :stuck_out_tongue:

Can you tell I’m a little bitter? I started making jewelry because I
can’t buy a watch that fits right, even 90% of men’s watches don’t
fit me and they sure don’t look very feminine. Rings? Forget it.
the first ring I owned that was a woman’s ring was my college ring,
in a size 13.5. I will worship ArtCarved foresight to the end of
days for that.

I read an article in Mode (a large size fashion magazine, the one
that isn’t slanted toward sexual fetishes) and there was this
little write up about a jeweler that did pieces for larger ladies and
sold to the stars etc etc etc blah blah blah. I went to her website
and was decidedly unimpressed. Sorry, but making a necklace 18
inches long does not a large size make! A choker (ala velvet
ribbon worn on the neck and not at the base) has to be 19 inches, 20
inches for the base of the neck, 22 for the shortest length I like to
wear.

I do have the largest fingers I’ve seen on a woman, my ring finger
takes a 13-13.5 in a narrow band. I’d love to wear more than two
rings and find rings on index fingers and thumbs really cool looking
but unless I make my own I can’t wear them, I need 15s for my index
fingers, in a narrow band.

Bracelets, well start at the average 7.5" but plan on going up to 9"
(yes, nine inches). I love anklets too but I generally buy a normal
person’s necklace (16") and then shorten it, or two normal bracelets
that I take apart and re-assemble them into an anklet.

Sometimes a large person isn’t just an average person with a bit too
much weight but a large person.

Large people like funky trendy stuff too, and there are large
teenagers out there dying (literally in some cases) to be able to
wear what everyone else is. Ever tried to find an armband to fit a
20 inch bicep? I have a mass produced armband that I bought to study
it more carefully… makes an almost big enough cuff bracelet!

Well I’ve ranted overly long on this, but my point is there is a
definite market for it but you’ll have to do a few things
differently. First you’re going to have to go to your customers
rather than having them come to you. I don’t mean housecalls but you
have to get past the ‘I’m not worth it’ mentality that a lot of
larger people, women especially, have. Buying jewelry for yourself
is an act of self acceptance (and women do buy most of their own
jewelry). The other thing that you might find has to be done
different is you’ll have to do a lot of custom work, at least if you
really want to serve the larger sized community. I cannot begin to
tell you how frustrating and demoralizing it is to hunt down leads on
places that have larger sizes of clothing or shoes (o jewelry) to
find the stop one size, or several sizes, from your own.

Lynn A. Davis
Tephra’s Treasures
Handcrafted Jewelry, Accessories
And Other Fine Treasures


#4

There is also a Huge Gap is Descent looking clothing for larger
wwomen. We seem to be redueces to alot of Polyester and old looking
clothing. Good looking items that are the current fashion are few
and far between without paying double the price of a size 10!

I also make jewelry for everyone. I make rings for women up to size
12 on a regular basis. I make bracelets in 7", 8" and 9" on a
regular basis. I also make longer necklaces.

I cater to the custom er on a one to one basis. I am a gallery shop.
I make each and eavery pieces I have. If it needs altering to suit
a client I am able to do so.

I find I have more larger and Beautiful Ladies ( & Men ) than the
swizzle stick sizes.

I make jewelry for real people, not the TV world of size 0 to 10!

Louise Roys Aquarius Custom Jewelry

----Original Message Follows----From: “Gary” ggaro@gte.net
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Subject: [Orchid] Large Size Ladies Jewlery
Date: Mon, 8 Nov 1999 17:54:47 -0600

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Greetings All!

I am in the process of forming a small company to market “classically
designed” rings and necklaces ( in the low to moderate price range)
to the Ladies “Plus” Size Market.

Just curious as to why there is such a void in this area of the
market? Seems there is a plethora of great designs for the petite to
average size gals but the big gals are forced to choose between this
and the current oversize gaudy stuff such as Delta Berke collection.

Would appreciate anyone’s spin regarding this as to why there is such
a void in this market and any designers and manufacturers that have
expertise in this area.

Many Thanks!

Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com


#5

Yes there is a considerable market out there for above-standard-size
jewelry, and as the baby boom generation comes to grips with
middle-age spread ,the market will grow even bigger—literally. Also
there are a lot of standard-size women with BIG hands who would
welcome a variety of well-designed rings in a large size. But
watch out how you market it. Vanity is a big factor when it comes
to size. D.


#6

Dear Lynn, I certainly sympathize with your size dilema…while I am
a man, it has still been very difficult for me to fit into a mass
produced, lowest common denominator world. I am six feet four and
weigh 260 lbs…finding something to fit in the ready to wear venues
is a constant challenge.Our business for at least the last twenty
years has been in areas with an above average presence of older and
often larger women…which leads me to the challenge I want to make
to your assumptions: you state that big women do not want to draw
attention to their bodies with showy “sparklies”. Wrong! More often
than not they want to draw attention AWAY from their bodies using the
diversion of ostentatious jewelry. Furthermore, since they feel that
they are disadvantaged physically they make a fashion statement which
makes them feel more glamorous. In a silmilar vein, young girls tend
to wear either jewelry that is peer group conformist or which is
inconspicuous inasmuch as they are often not yet comfortable with
their bodies. At the other end of the age spectrum, ladies who are
approaching middle age often use the diversion technique as
previously mentioned. When it comes to ready made sizes in jewelry
perhaps the biggest gap in demand and flexibility occurs in precious
metal bracelets. Very few bracelets are available in other than seven
inch lengths. This is a real problem when a customer wants you to
lengthen an outgrown piece or when she wants to order a high ticket
ready made piece. Extenders can sometimes be improvised, but, more
often than not, improvised extensions interrupt the design continuity
of the piece. I am afraid that the jewelry industry, including the
small custom shops, is even more conservative than the clothing
industry when nit comes to realizing trends and changes in the
market. One of the obvious realities of the American marketplace is
that we are having difficulty reconciling the benefits of affluence
and the effects of overrindulgence…gawd how I love ice cream!
Ron Mills at Mills Gem, Los Osos, CA


#7

Actually, I said that many larger women are societally conditioned to
think that way not that they all do.

As for assumptions, I live this. Every breath of every day of
every year of my life I live it. Most of my friends llive it too, be
they 20 or 60 they live it.

The 30,000 beads and sequins on the typical ‘formal dress’ made for
large size women blows the idea of sparkle distracting from size
right out of the water. Though I suppose blinding everyone without a
20 foot radius might be considered distracting.

    Furthermore, since they feel that they are disadvantaged
physically they make a fashion statement which makes them feel more
glamorous. 

You must circulate in an atypical crowd, though you did say they tend
to be older, and they probably are upper middle class as well.
Anyone that is forced to shop from the likes of Roman’s and Lane
Bryant catalogs gives up on glamour in a hurry, it’s just not
possible from those catalogs and the alternatives are much too costly
for most.

     In a silmilar vein, young girls tend to wear either jewelry
that is peer group conformist or which is inconspicuous inasmuch as
they are often not yet comfortable with their bodies. 

We definitely move in different circles. The young teen girls around
here are very agressive with their looks, which is it’s own
insecurity, but it’s still anything but inconspicuous.

    At the other end of the age spectrum, ladies who are approaching
middle age often use the diversion technique as previously
mentioned. 

Let’s just say that I’m between ‘young girl’ and ‘middle aged’ and
pretty much typify the point where larger women generally decide to
tell the world to go hang or decide to remain in the shadows, the
critical juncture you might say. In general, women like me (large in
every way, including being as tall if not taller than their
mates/dates) prefer the classy elegance and, yes, understated and
unremarkable effect. It celebrates the curves without screaming
"look at me!"

But I suppose someone has to be buying those horrid beaded fushia
fiascos in the catalogs.

     When it comes to ready made sizes in jewelry perhaps the
biggest gap in demand and flexibility occurs in precious metal
bracelets. Very few bracelets are available in other than seven inch
lengths. <snip> 

Bangles. Try finding a bangle bracelet to fit a large person. Now
there’s one company, AmpleStuff, that carries some larger diameter
bangles but they are the only place I’ve ever seen them. Really,
anything remotely fitted is hard to get, rings, bracelets,
anklets… omegas. I’d love to own an omega but I’ve never seen one
remotely long enough.

   I am afraid that the jewelry industry, including the small custom
shops, is even more conservative than the clothing industry when nit
comes to realizing trends and changes in the market. 

It’s only in the past five years that I’ve been able to find women’s
dress shoes, and at the beginning the only place you could get them
was shops catering to transvestites. Yes, they made pumps for
men before they made them for the primary wearers of the style. So
while the jewelry industry is indeed lagging woefully behind they
aren’t the only ones slow on the uptake.

     One of the obvious realities of the American marketplace is
that we are having difficulty reconciling the benefits of affluence
and the effects of overrindulgence.....gawd how I love ice cream!
Ron Mills at Mills Gem, Los Osos, CA  

Large size isn’t always a result of over indulgence. The American
marketplace has flatly ignored statistics that show that women are
taller (and simply larger) then they were fifty years ago. You know
how men can buy pants with different specific inseam lengths, and
shirts in different sleeve lengths? That doesn’t happen for women.
Finally we can find some tall length pants (inseam length varies
though so you have to check the length if possible) but we still
can’t get shirts or coats in tall. It’s rather difficult to keep
warm when your sleeves are two inches too short and your shirt won’t
stay tucked in because the torso is also too short.

Lynn A. Davis
Tephra’s Treasures
Handcrafted Jewelry, Accessories
And Other Fine Treasures


#8
   Bangles.  Try finding a bangle bracelet to fit a large person. 
Now there's one company, AmpleStuff, that carries some larger
diameter bangles but they are the only place I've ever seen them. 
Really, anything remotely fitted is hard to get, rings, bracelets,
anklets.... omegas.  I'd love to own an omega but I've never seen
one remotely long enough. 

Hi Lynn –

Me too on the bangle – only I have the opposite problem! I’m a very
small person. My wrist is tiny, and every bangle I’ve ever seen slides
right off my hand, even with my fingers spread out! I don’t own a true
choker necklace either: the only ones I’ve seen that would fit
properly around my neck were made of pink plastic. And forget
sunglasses – I hate buying ones with Tweety Bird or Winnie the Pooh
on the side, and they’re often the only ones that fit properly!

On the whole, I’ll cheerfully admit my problem is more socially
acceptable – being very thin (even if you are short too!) is
considered desirable. Still, it would be nice to see jewelry etc.
offered in a wider range of sizes, so just once in a while those of us
outside the “norm” could buy something off the shelf.

Suzanne

Suzanne Wade
writer/editor
SuWade@ici.net
Phone/Fax 508-339-7366


#9

Dear Lynn, You are what you think you are…Janet Reno and Madeline
Albright will never make the center fold of Playboy, but they sure
are intellectual powerhouses! I’ve never met anybody who did not have
one or more disadvantages, imagined, real or exaggerated. You will
never find any sympathy amongst those who are truly handicapped ! Go
with what you’ve got!..you are lucky to have a good mind so use
it! Aside from personal considerations, my basic perception is that we
little operators have a niche market opportunity in supplying the
needs of those who don’t fit into mass market molds. We also have an
opportunity in customizing product for those who don’t fit the market
hypes. If you allow yourself to be swallowed by Madison Avenue mind
bending you have only yourself to blame. Ron Mills at Mills Gem Co.
Los Osos, CA.


#10
Large size isn't always a result of over indulgence.  The American
marketplace has flatly ignored statistics that show that women are
taller (and simply larger) then they were fifty years ago. 

On a vaguely related note, I wish there was some kind of
standardization for sizes of womens’ things – this whole S-M-L-XL
stuff does’t cut it. I think they have a leg up in Europe. Anyway, I
dislike walking into store A and taking a M, and walking into store B
and hunting for the XLs. I am a normally proportioned woman, but it
is frustrating to no end to try and figure out by eyeball what size
I’m looking at.

The jeweller I apprenticed with initially did most of her custom work
for larger women, and made a frickin’ mint at it, too. I just dislike
the fact that there needs to be a differential between “'normal’
women’s jewellery” and “large women’s jewellery”. Why not just make
it in a wide array of sizes to begin with and avoid the labels?

-Kieran


#11

Hi Lynn & Suzanne, Right on Re: the bangle sizing. I made up a set
of bangle sizers just like ring sizers, but with my own code for
size. I have people try on the bangles to find the correct size for
them, then custom make the bangle. I made the sizers in brass, to
save on $, but one could make up a set in silver, then have a product
to actually sell if necessary.

Judymw Judy M. Willingham, Consumer Pollution Prevention Specialist

237 Seaton Hall Kansas State University Manhattan KS 66506
(785)532-5418 FAX (785) 532-6944


#12

Gary, I’ve been following this thread and have not posted yet but felt
I should voice an opinion on this. I am 5ft 1in tall (if I stretch as
tall as possible), I weigh 180 pounds due to a medical condition. I do
not apologize for my size one bit. I am a sexy woman and I am told so
everyday by a loving husband. 2 years ago I weighed 110 pounds, so I
have been on both sides of the weight issue. Even at 110 pounds I
found I had to make my own jewelry. I have large hands, very muscular,
as my second job for 14 years was carpet laying. My wrists are small,
a bangle will not go over my hand but will slid almost up to my elbow.
Very uncomfortable. Rings unless custom made are to narrow and small
or to wide and gaudy. I have NO self esteem issues to try to hide my
body behind, and have no friends who are using jewelry or no jewelry
to hide behind either. Before this gets to long I’ll just say, “YES,
there is a major shortage for jewelry that looks like fine, good
jewelry for the larger woman.”…Char Ms. Charolette’s Gold & Gem
Specialties L.L.C.


#13

I know some other people stuck shopping in the kid’s department (feel
really bad for some of the ladies that have larger busts, what a pain
they have!) I know there are a few chain stores in New England at
least that target the size 0 and size 1 crowd. Can’t help with names
though, it’s not like I’ve had need to notice them myself!
chuckles I have problems with glasses as well of course, and hats.
Thank goodness for the trend to ‘androgynous’ and ‘unisex’ designs is
all I can say.

On the whole, I'll cheerfully admit my problem is more socially
acceptable -- being very thin (even if you are short too!)  is
considered desirable. Still, it would be nice to see jewelry etc.
offered in a wider range of sizes, so just once in a while those of us
outside the "norm" could buy something off the shelf. 

Rings smaller than 6 and larger than 9 would sure be nice. Bracelets
in more lengths than 7 and 7.5 inches… I think Americans in
particular get too obsessed with averages, we design everything for
the ‘average’ person and ignore the fact that the average person may
not exist, only equal numbers of above and below average.

This growing mismatch of average with reality probably explains why
so many people are spending a bit more to buy custom made stuff when
it’s available for less than budget pulverizing prices.

Lynn A. Davis
Tephra’s Treasures
Handcrafted Jewelry, Accessories
And Other Fine Treasures


#14

Kieran, I think too many overlook the stigma of having to buy “large.”

There is nothing wrong with offering pendants on chains of different
lengths. The same would go for strands of Pearls or Beads. Chokers
could also be sold in a variety of inches.

I fail to understand what is called jewelry for large women. Most of
us know that pendants need to fall above or below the bust line to
avoid bouncing. I have seem rather slim ladies with implants or a
natural abundance in the breasts have the same problem.

We the persons making the jewelry do not have to add to the
discomfort of women. We are only speaking about inches here. Teresa


#15

I am confused: When it comes to Jewelry, it is simple. Rings are a
certain size, all standardized based on numbers…I am a size 6.5. I
used to be a size 5. But as I got older and bigger my fingers got
bigger. I tried on the ring sizer, and found out my standard ring
size. As for broches etc, they are all different sizes, so who
cares… Necklaces come in numeric lengths… 14" 16" etc. again all
very standard. So, unless you are referring to clothes, I am very
confused by your post. And even with clothes, the Plus sizes have
specific sizing. 18, 20 22 etc. Sure, all clothes also come in Sm, M.
L and XL. But even then, regular sized women need to try on clothes to
tell if the thing fits or not. I don’t think anyone can just take a
size and figure it will fit them. Even in shoes.

m


#16

We larger ladies are privileged in one respect, we can wear large,
flamboyant pieces with ease and style. But petite earrings or pins
can accentuate our size difference. Sometimes just the all over scale
of jewelry is wrong for us. Rose Alene McArthur


#17

I fail to understand what is jewelry for large women

Jewelry for large women is the same as jewelry for small or average
women, except for the fact that it fits properly and not enough of it
is made to accommodate the people who need it. A 6-foot tall woman
with a size 18 neck will have one heck of a time finding an omega
necklace or a choker that fits. People with broad,thick fingers or
large finger joints need appropriately sized rings. By the way,
this thread applies to men’s jewelry too. …and there are more
large people around than manufacturers care to recognize. I don’t
just mean overweight…I mean large! Dee


#18

hi all i usually carry a good supply of large sized goodies, cause
that way i can embez…i mean, product test, yeah, that’s what i
meant, product test… and since i make wire jewelry, and when i
do shows, i make up tons on a made to order basis… seems like
every show no matter how many i have ready, a different gemstone
bead, or size is necessary. i find i can adjust sizes without too
much of a problem. but i do have a story that still makes my teeth
clench…

a tray of baby rings was ready, and getting lots of attention.
baby rings. this beautiful woman came up, slipped one on her RING
FINGER and asked if i had any smaller, she was afraid it might slip
around.

i didn’t even throw anything…

pat


#19

Hi all, This might be off the beaten track a bit, since it’s not
directly about sizing, but yesterday I met with someone who works for
a woman who owns an antique store in Italy. Thw woman works with a
designer, I’m told, who makes “very large” jewelry. The jewelry is
costume, but I’m told, again, very high quality, and it’s made from
lucite. I haven’t seen the stuff yet, but I’ve put in a request for
some visuals to the person I heard about this from. If anyone is
interested in knowing more, please let me know. Also, about the
sizing problems that I’ve been reading about: what about getting
custom sized rings, bracelets, necklaces? There are a lot of
jewelers out there who will custom make bracelets, rings, necklaces
to anyone’s personal size. You pay a little more, yes, but the work
I’ve seen from some jewelers is impeccable and well worth it. I was
surprised that noone mentioned this option. Have a good day,
everyone! -Madd. at Arts Umbrella


#20
       I am confused: When it comes to Jewelry, it is simple. Rings
are a certain size, all standardized based on numbers... Necklaces
come in numeric lengths... 14" 16" etc. again all very standard. 

If you haven’t been big, it’s easy to be confused by this. For
themost part, it’s a matter of scale. Create a necklace that looks
nice on an average neck, and it may look ridiculously dainty on a
large neck, and absurdly clunky on a really small woman’s neck. Many
wonderful necklaces just aren’t made in 22" and 24" lengths, but that
is what some large women need. Making jewelry for larger women or
smaller women isn’t just a matter of sizing up or down–it’s thinking
about how the components and the final piece will look when put on
that large or small woman. Sort of like putting a dainty vase on a
billiard-table sized desk–it doesn’t look to scale.