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I need an idea to install a Vibrating lap


#1

Hello all,

i have acquired a 27" highland park Vibrating lap. looks like a
great device, but when i turn it on, it is trying to “walk” across
the floor.

I have installed new rubber feet, used a level to adjust the 4 legs,
and it is still trying to move around the floor.

short of bolting it to the concrete floor, any ideas on how to
stabilize the base?

I am usually pretty good with machines, but on this one, I could use
a good idea.

warm regards
Mark Zirinsky
denver


#2
I am usually pretty good with machines, but on this one, I could
use a good idea. 

Sandbags.

Dan Culver


#3

I had three, and that’s how I kept mine in the same place. Works
better too.

Tony
www.TheGemDoctor.com


#4

Hi Mark,

My unit was smaller, about 15 inches. I built a 2 x 4 frame with a
plywood bottom and lined it with half inch sheet foam. The legs just
fit inside the frame. It was heavy enough to not move and the foam
kept it from rattling against the wood so it was quiet. I used stuff
just lying around so there was no cost involved and it worked.

You could pour some concrete in the frame if you need more waight so
it stays in place. Put the foam on top the concrete and it is still
quiet. You did not modify the machine and it can be seperated and be
easily moved if needed.

John Daly
Grand Junction, CO.


#5
short of bolting it to the concrete floor, any ideas on how to
stabilize the base? 

How 'bout bolting it to a piece of plywood, large enough so there’s
room to hold that board down to the floor with sandbags.

Or use a bit more plywood to make a low flat box onto which the lap
can be bolted. before covering over the top, fill it with concrete.
You don’t need to bolt it to the floor, in order to have it bolted to
a hundred pounds of concrete (or just loose rock filling the box
would probably do it too.)

I’m kind of thinking of the trick some people have used to secure
their Kerr centrifugal casting machines. The one where one scrounged
up an old oil drum, puts casters on the bottom so it will roll
around, fill it half way with concrete wo it weights a whole lot, cap
the concrete with plywood or something to which you an bolt the
machine, and it’s secured, while the upper part of the drum gives you
a shield for the machine… Even when the arm isn’t balanced at all
properly, done right this can still be totally rock solid. Sheer
mass holding it in place. You don’t need the shield, and could have
it lower down, but the basic idea is the same.

Peter Rowe


#6

Mark,

For my vibratory tumblers I tacked down paint stir sticks in a square
shape big enough to allow the tumbler to sit and shake without danger
of them walking off the table. You might think of doing something
like that for you vibe lap. Either bolt 1x4s down to the concrete
floor or take a square piece of plywood and build a lip around the
edge then tack on edge to the wall. Bear in mind that any vibration
transferred to the wall will be amplified and may be annoyingly
noisy. Also, you can buy industrial strength Velcro strips that peal
and stick at Home Depot and attach one side to the floor and one side
to the feet of the lap. Just some thoughts off the top of my head.

Rick Copeland
rockymountainwonders.com


#7

Mark,

I don’t know whether there is a solution short of bolting the damn
thing into the floor. We had the same issue at the place where I
previously was, two 27 or 24 inchers, and adjust and level them as
we would, nothing worked, they still walked. Short of bolting maybe
lasso it to a joist with a bungee cord or something like that: let
it dance but constrict its radius.

Cheers
Hans Durstling
Moncton, Canada


#8

I have worked out a solution that works for me. I have a Neycraft
caster. I got a very very heavy low cabinet with double doors. I
filled the interior solid with large concrete blocks. Then I bolted
the caster to the top of the cabinet. So far no problems. I am a bit
concerned that eventually the weight of the heavy concrete blocks
may push the bottom of the cabinet loose. The floor of the cabinet is
1inch from the floor, not flush with it. If this happens I will push
some wood blocks underneath for extra support.

Alma


#9
I have installed new rubber feet, used a level to adjust the 4
legs, and it is still trying to move around the floor. 

I had that problem one time… I had the lap in the back of a
store. A customer came in and we were designing a ring. I seen her
looking over my shoulder and she began to laugh… the lap was
marching its way right out the shop entrance & into the showroom! We
had a great laugh.

I tried everything but finally ended the “runaway” by setting the lap
on a piece of .5" or so thick piece of rubber mat. It was cut off of
a floor mat for a livestock trailer. The rubber feet seem to grip the
mat.

Hope this helps! Dan
DeArmond Tool
http://www.dearmondtool.com


#10

I don’t know what your machine is but it sounds kinda big. Have you
thought about cannibalizing the suspension from a clothes washer?
basically the working unit mounts on springs so the imbalance does
not transmit to the main frame so much. Or perhaps use rubber
spindle engine mounts like for a hot rod (there he goes again)