Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

How to make this type of setting


#1

I ran across this lovely piece on a website: Goldsmith Silversmith -
some love work shown. I am looking for info (a tutorial possibly) on
how you make this type of setting - namely how do you keep the stone
in the setting - is there a hole drilled in the stone or something
that keeps it in. Any help would be appreciated.

The piece was made by a jewelry artist, Heather Kita.

Debbie
DeMoy Jewelry Designs


#2

Pieces that I’ve seen like this have had epoxy believe it or not! If
there’s another way, I’ll be interested to hear as well!


#3
is there a hole drilled in the stone or something that keeps it in. 

Probably setting compound…AKA glue.


#4

it looks like beach glass, and i would guess some sort of adhesive is
used to hold it in place. the finding parts looks very perpendicular
to itself, while the ‘stone’ has irregular curves. it doesn’t appear
that the ‘bezel’ actually holds the stone in place. or it could be
jammed in place [pressure fitted]… u might google the craftsperson
and see if you can contact her.

hth,
richard


#5

It appears that it is set by cementing or gluing it in place.


#6
namely how do you keep the stone in the setting 

Judging solely by the pic… it looks cemented in, which might be why
the bezel is so tall and straight. I base that on the space between
the bezel and the stone.


#7

The item shown is well made and a good design. In answer to your
question I must summise that the ‘stone’ is held in place with epoxy
resin or other strong glue. The socket has not been closed with
intimate contact with the stone around the edge.

No dishonour at all. Glue alone is practical and economic. Closing
the bezel is a guarantee that the stone cannot come out. Glueing is a
better solution specially if the stone very fragile or needs to be
easily removable for future work.

Alastair


#8
Closing the bezel is a guarantee that the stone cannot come out. 

I’m not normally a fan of glue, and favour a mechanical setting by
closing the bezel over the stone. However, on this particular piece,
I think that trying to close the bezel closer to the stone would
have ruined the look. The size and shape of the bezel give a nice,
balanced look, and glue is probably the only way to successfully set
a stone in this case.

Helen
UK


#9

Thanks everyone for your responses. Is there 1 specific epoxy that
you would recommend. Does it depend upon the material you are
setting, i.e. glass, gemstone, etc.

Debbie


#10
Is there 1 specific epoxy that you would recommend. Does it depend
upon the material you are setting, i.e. glass, gemstone, etc. 

Epoxy 220, commonly sold through jewelers supply and lapidary
suppliers, is ideal for this, and made for exactly this type of bond
(metal to metal, metal to stone or glass, stone to stone, etc.) The
"220" version is amber colored. They also make a clear colorless one
called epoxy 330, good when the color of the epoxy is a factor. The
220 is a slightly stronger product, a bit more resistant over time to
water, etc. But the 330 is also a standard widely used epoxy for
this type of work, and is also very durable. I still have some pieces
I put together back in the early 70’s with the aid of epoxy 330 that
are still just fine.

Both types are fairly slow setting, with a working time around 10 to
15 minutes, setting to a tack free state in about an hour, with full
strength reached in 12 to 24 hours, if I remember the label right. If
you’re in a hurry, though, either type can be put under a heat lamp
(an inch away from any ordinary incandescent bulb light does it just
fine). Heated like that, it sets fully in 10 minutes.

HTH
Peter Rowe


#11

Fast-setting 5 minute epoxies are sufficient. They are excellent gap
fillers and set into a hard plastic. They depend more on a physical
keying than surface bonding…ie if filling the gap will secure the
stone due to surface irregularities then it will remain secure.

Slow-setting 12 hour epoxies have more surface bonding and set into a
harder plastic.

Both are long lasting and chemical resistant. Both perform best when
the quantities of resin and hardner are measured carefully (usually
equal portions of each), and they must be completely mixed. Failure
to do so can produce a rubbery or a weak and crumbly plastic.

Alastair