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Holiday season production


#1

Hi everybody:

There have been a few who have written in lately about being
discouraged for various reasons. I tried to write thoughtful
responses, not realizing, at the time, that everyone is subject to
discouragement from time to time.I’m not quite sure what my question
is because I’m not quite sure what I need.

Like a lot of people, I’m getting ready these days to sell all I can
in the upcoming season. A couple of months ago, I sat down and
planned for this…2 hours/large bracelet, 1 hour/small bracelet,
40 minutes for earrings, 3 hours/woven necklace etc etc. I’m quickly
discovering that it doesn’t exactly work like that. The body has
limitations and sitting for this long each day is literally breaking
my back. I have found out already that I have had quite enough of the
65 dollar small bracelet.

The thing is, I know I want it to be different…but I don’t know
how. I have my head down, working, but not working smart. After my
big debut in town and I have my money in the bank, then what? I am in
need of a career counselor of sorts. Do I go to FIT? Do I fully equip
my studio to work with metal? Do I just buy beads and keep going with
what I have been doing? Do I bag the whole thing and put the money in
the bank for my sons?

If I could see the possibilities out there, I might be able to see
what I want to do. You guys are a good group and I mean that, but you
have the tendency (some) to be a bit discouraging at times. If
jewelers are so dissatisfied with what they are doing, why am I
trying so hard to be one? Can I talk to someone happy?

I don’t want to just keep taking classes on and on. At 500 dollars a
pop, the money runs out quick and I’m back to square one. I wish I
had a crystal ball because I don’t know what my goal is.

I hope I get some answers because I’m kinda laying it all out there.
Now everybody knows how I feel. It’s a little embarrassing.

Thanks for any help
Kim


#2

Dear Kim

As you have well said…everyone goes through discouraging
time…and fortuantley for us we have a forum to raise questions and
express feelings that we are not usually free to do in the outside
world…So yes as much as it appears discouraging, you need to read
the responses the those problems…

We all start out like you have…we all have a love for the industry
as you have…and we all have bad days…we just all dont often have
the opportunity to express the good days…

Jewellery is a tough and competitive industry…with lots of
pressure from the outside, but even more so pressure you put on
yourself to acheive…to achieve the goal/design in your
thoughts…and pressure from the outside world…

Adressing your issue is this situation of “what next??” Only u can
decide that…u first have to ask yourself why u are doing what u are
doing…ask it and answer it, both in honesty. If u are doing it
soley for the money then keep going with your bead work…if u doing
for the love of the industry…if u really love to creat things…and
want to do itin metal and stones then forge ahead and set up your
workshop…But u will only know what u want to do if u know why u
are doing what you are doing presently…its a tough decision…with
lots of risk…but its really not all bad to be a jeweller…just
like every other professional…we all have our down days…

Keep riding high…be honest with yourself about your motives and it
will all fall into place…goals are the key…have them and make sure
u acheive them…and by the way…its ok if the goals change along
the way…

Good luck
Raakhi


#3

Kim,

Can I talk to someone happy? 

I’m very happy with what I do. But happiness means different things
to different people. I’m happy that I can make things I enjoy making
on a regular basis. I’m happy to have the opportunity to enter so
many different people’s lives in so many meaningful ways. Does that
mean I’m always happy about the jobs I have to do or the money I
make? No but in this business in particular you have to take the good
with the bad. If you do retail, you will always have some bad
customers. If you do custom work you will always have to do some jobs
you think are really ugly. If you make jewelry you will always screw
something up, lose something, break someone’s stones. If you sell
wholesale you will always have some bad payers. Hey that’s just a
part of the job.

As for being different and choosing the path you want to follow,
well I think that is just sort of inside you somewhere. Some people
don’t have the ability to move forward in a way that allows them to
be “different”. Some do. Some can develop it. But if you don’t keep
trying, I can assure you that you will never find out. Just for fun,
why don’t you try to do something completely different that anything
you’ve tried before in the field (I know you’re a beader so why don’t
you try to make some silver rings or something). Get out there and
play with your tools and supplies. Just play. See what happens.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-234-4392
www.spirerjewelers.com


#4

Hi, Kim. One thing I would consider is classes that aren’t 500 a
pop. I know they can be expensive, but I think they can be less than
that. The other thing is spread production out as much as you can.
I’m in the same life-raft because I wasn’t able to do very much work
until now, thus I have no inventory for the three shows coming up in
a couple of weeks. I vow to spread out production as soon as the
holidays are over and get to work.

Other than that, I sympathise with you. I fully understand where you
are coming from. It’s a little stressful. And trying to figure out
where to go from here and expand into metal fabrication, I would find
a studio with all the equipment and learn there. I started out
beading, which I love, but have moved into casting and fabrication. I
absolutely love it because it is just so much more than beads and
string, which can be wonderful too, but for me not as satisfying.

The main thing is spreading out production. Then the physical stress
isn’t so much.

Hope this helps.
Veronica


#5
have the tendency (some) to be a bit discouraging at times. If
jewelers are so dissatisfied with what they are doing, why am I
trying so hard to be one? Can I talk to someone happy? 

Me. I’m happy. I get to work in the finest materials in the world. I
get to work with some of the finest people in the world. I tell my
bridal clients that I get to make heirlooms for the happiest people
in the world. Our shop didn’t happen over night, but it’s stuffed
full
of most every useful thing known to man. It’s like walking into a
candy store. Some of the dissatisfaction is the repetition, I think.
I call myself a “precision welder” sometimes - fusing a platinum
shank
for $25 pays the bills. Some of it, and I share this, is that
becoming a jeweler is a long, hard road. Many students want to come
out swinging, naturally, and a gallery will show them a case and say,
“Here’s that work, right here, for cheaper.” It’s not to be
discouraging, it’s to be realistic - it takes lots of work for little
pay to learn enough to be good at it. Some people are lucky/talented -

Laurel Birch was a good example. She just hit the right combination
and had marketing skills and just went flying… Most people aren’t so
lucky, though. Millions of people in the world make a good living at
jewelry making on one level or another, though, so there must be
something there… Hang in there, it’s worth it!!!

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#6

You keep going. If you need to take a break you take a break, But you
come back to it. Jewelry work is glamorous about 10% of the time, the
rest is, as you say, head down, working. Get used to the crick in
your neck and the shooting pain in your thumb, it goes with the
territory, especially in the fourth quarter. I literally collapsed
in the Doctor’s office from working so hard one year. Saline IV
brought me back in a half hour. Sure jewelers grumble about work and
situations. Look what we’re faced with…creating something
wonderful from bits of metal and stone for a public that can be
frustratingly fickle at times. Ahhhh, but when it all works it’s
Grand. And you can make a tidy profit. Which you can spend on taking
that break so you can get back to work again!


#7

Hi Kim, I guess we all wish we had a crystal ball to see how our
lives and lively hoods would turn out. All I can say is I love what
I do. NO, it is my passion. I was meant to be a jeweler. Working
with my hands and creating is so rewarding when the customers face
lights up. And yes, it can be back breaking, I am always sore at the
end of a busy day. I do what ever I can to sooth the pain, because I
love what I do. And after 29 years I am getting pretty good at it.
Even when I have a set back, like recently a custom job feel through
due to a cheap customer wanting the impossible, I learn from it and
move on. So, do you love what you do? Can you think of anything that
would be more rewarding? I only wish everyone making a living could
love what they do for money.

Best regards, Janine


#8

Hey Kim,

Like a lot of people, I'm getting ready these days to sell all I
can in the upcoming season.it doesn't exactly work like that Do I
go to FIT? Do I fully equip my studio to work with metal? Do I just
buy beads and keep going with what I have been doing?

it’s good to plan and be organised, but as you’ve found, the plan
sometimes goes out the window- so do what makes you happy- I always
try and do everything, all at once, cover all options, because
working like that is what makes me happy- i might end up a little
crazy by Christmas, but being crazy is my form of sanity and I’ve had
a great time along the way. I’ve found that I actually work better
under pressure, and i even manage to impress myself at my output :slight_smile:
go girl, and enjoy

Christine in Sth Australia


#9
If jewelers are so dissatisfied with what they are doing, why am I
trying so hard to be one? Can I talk to someone happy? 

I’m the happiest person I know. In fact, if I were any happier,
there’d have to be two of me just to handle it!! Sure, there are
negative aspects to what I do, but I seldom allow them to get me
down.
When they do get me down, the next customer always helps me feel
better. Always. The reason for that is because they all come through
the “man trap cage” asking “Hi, how are you?,” and my answer is
always something like "I’m great! Better than ever! Never better! Or,
my favorite, “If I were any better, there’d have to be two of me just
to handle it!”

Every time I say it, I believe it, and so do they. It makes them
smile, which makes me smile. Most of the folks who hang out at the
bar next door will often come in just to ask me how I’m doing, simply
to make themselves feel better. They have asked me how I can stay so
"up" in a retail situation and the only answer I can give is, because
I won’t live any other way. Even when I’m not feeling my best,
someone
will ask me how I’m doing, and my reply always cheers me up (probably
some kind of “self-fulfilling prophecy” thing). I also have the
advantage of having my own workshop to go home to, equipped with
pretty much anything I need to do what I want. I cab in my shop out
back, while I can facet in my living room. My "little shop out back"
has everything I need to work metal, make molds, cast, fabricate, saw
and cut stones, etc. It took a long time to put together (years and
years), but during those years, I always stayed happy knowing I could
do what I want with what I had. Knowing you can do whatever you want
with what you have is key.

I also stay busy with hobbies and other lifelong pursuits.
Marksmanship is fun to me, especially polishing and trimming bullet
cases, pressing the primers into them, weighing each powder charge
and bullet, then seating them as perfectly likewise as I can. With a
hand lever, I can even do it in my living room while watching TV. And
just like the bowler who wants to improve their average, or the
golfer
who wants to better their handicap, I try to improve my marksmanship
by making my own match grade ammo and tuning my own firearms. I’ve
collected guitars for over 40 years and now have 12 to choose from.
Anytime I feel down well, MAN, there’s nothing like 12-bar blues to
get over that! Learning new (to my repertoire), challenging tunes is
extremely relaxing to me. Learning Classical Gas by Mason Williams
was…well, a gas. I’m still struggling with Mood for a Day, by
Steve Howe and Cowboys From Hell by Pantera (my musical tastes are
eclectic, for sure).

With a 14-year career in the tattoo biz, I picked up some decent
drawing skills, so I can also pick up a pencil, rapidograph, colored
pencils and watercolors and draw. Sometimes I’ll do some jewelry
illustrations, but when I’m down, I’ll often draw something that
represents how I feel, then burn it in a “burn barrel.” Any
fireproof,
usually metal container will do for the purpose, but I have a special
small, hexagonal copper thing that works well for the purpose. It
always feels good to let it go up in flames. A lot of skulls and
other
creatures have met their fiery end in my burn barrel. So have a lot
of
bummers.

But it doesn’t stop there. A couple of weeks ago, I started a new
hobby I’ve been wanting to do my whole life, but never had a chance
to until now; scuba diving. My classroom work is finished and I’ve
done my pool dives. Tomorrow (Sunday), I’ll do some lake dives, then
finish off on Thursday with a wreck dive (The Ancient Mariner) and a
reef drift dive. This part of the country has enough reefs, wrecks
and
freshwater caves to keep me interested for a long time.

My point in typing all this isn’t to throw myself out to the world
as some kind of bon vivant, but I guess that’s what I am these days.
Even during lean financial periods, I will always find something to
do and be happy about, and I will always search for new inspiration
to continue to be happy with whatever my current career choice. The
real point I’m trying to make is, find a way to try everything you
can; you’ll probably like it all!

I don't want to just keep taking classes on and on. At 500 dollars
a pop, the money runs out quick and I'm back to square one. I wish
I had a crystal ball because I don't know what my goal is.20 

I don’t remember where you live, Kim, so I’m not sure how much good
this suggestion will be for you. Join a rock & gem club. Or a gem and
jewelry club. Or a gem and mineral club, et cetera. Chances are very
good they will have knowledgeable people with plenty of different
equipment who do all sorts of things you may be interested in. All of
them will be more than happy to share knowledge (that’s why they
joined the club). They’ll also be happy to show you what they like to
do in their own shops and homes. That way, you’ll get a much better
picture as to whether you want to outfit yourself with a complete
metalworking shop, lapidary equipment, etc., or even whether you’d
want to go to FIT. The local club here has brought in experts who do
educational programs and demonstrations onthings like lampworking,
dichroic glass, keum-boo, reticulation, gemology, wirewrapping - the
list goes on and on. Every month there is something new and
different. I wish I had the time and money to do all of it. I’m
actually more likely to be discouraged over not having enough time
and
money to do EVERYthing, much less be despondent over not knowing what
to do next. The next thing always presents itself, somehow.

Like a lot of people, I'm getting ready these days to sell all I
can in the upcoming season. A couple of months ago, I sat down and
planned for this.....2 hours/large bracelet, 1 hour/small
bracelet, 40 minutes for earrings, 3 hours/woven necklace etc etc.
I'm quickly discovering that it doesn't exactly work like that. The
body has limitations and sitting for this long each day is
literally breaking my back. 

I absolutely understand the need to work hard at the right time in
this business to make the best return for your time and effort, but
I’m sure you already know that causing yourself physical harm isn’t
the way to be happy. Since a couple of months isn’t adequate, perhaps
you can begin your seasonal prep time a few months in advance. I
don’t
know your schedule, so I don’t know if that’s possible for you.
Either
way, it seems you don’t have enough time for recreational pursuits
and
I hope you can manage to plan for some of that time soon.

Recreation costs money, and most of it costs a lot. Some of it in
the form of admission fees, some in the form of equipment purchase or
rental. A fair amount of cost is also eaten up by time away from
work.
But if you don’t spend some of that time, it will still cost you in
the end, perhaps more than if you had stayed at work and hurt
yourself. When you do work hard, try to factor in some time away from
that work to regain your health; physical, mental and spiritual.
Those
are the times when your next step, move, investment, etc. will come.
At least, that’s what works for me.

I hope I get some answers because I'm kinda laying it all out
there. Now everybody knows how I feel. It's a little embarrassing. 

Yeah, I know how ya feel because I’ve been there. Everything I wrote
above is how I deal with it. I included everything I could think of
because I have no idea which part, or any of it, might help you. I
hope some part of it does.

Empathetically yours,
James S. Duncan, G.G.
James in SoFL


#10

Hi kim,

We all have different approaches to this industry. In my opinion,
keep try to move up in class. don’t be satisfied with working your
self into a sore back for a few bucks. At least get well paid for it.
Most processes are learned thru repetition. If you want to learn
prong setting, set 500 stones and you will have learned. Use silver
castings and foil back stones. The first 100 or so will break, but
eventually you will have success. After that, you can set a natural
stone in gold or platinum with no fear and you’ll be better paid for
it. Hang in there and call or e-mail me directly if I can help.You
are a positive influence on orchid and we all hate to see you
discouraged.

Tom Arnold


#11

Hi Kim,

I just read your post & now I realize what my husband, John was
referring to. Yes, we share the shop, tools & computer but we don’t
always know what the other is thinking. Nor do we know what they are
writing about. Looking back to 1980, I had my mid-life crisis early,
at 28. I was then a grammar school teacher, doing & learning jewelry
work on the side( since college days). I was being, home-shooled so
to speak by an extremely talented craftswoman, Cythnthia B. Thomas.
She got me on track to pursue what I already had a love for. When she
learned some technique, she taught me. When she went to San Jose
State for her masters, she would teach me what she had learned. After
awhile I was able to advance myself through the waxing & casting
world. Then I went to work in a trade -shop as a “jeweler”( really
meaning -first job in the commercial field meant polisher. Yes, I
did this for 2 years,at 5 days a week, 8 hours a day etc. As time
went on, I got to work in a very prestigeous wedding ring company in
SF. Then eventually went out on my own. As John said, we work with
great metals, gems, & most of all-people. This means fellow
craftspeople & customers. Sure there are days when I could throw
something out a 9 story window because of whatever reason. And yes,
there are definitely some, how to say this nicely, butt heads out
there that I have to work with/for. Yes, even I have been in some bad
situations- a robbery, accused of grand theft, work with an embezzler
etc. Do I know for sure what the future holds?? Sort of, sort of not.
But I do know that I am in the right place, doing the right thing &
bills do get paid. Would I like to have more $$, sure! In the
meantime I will keep honing my skills & knowledege. I will keep
putting my custom work & repair work our there. I will continue to
make heirlooms & sentimental items… Just now as I write this,several
good jewelers in my building have stopped by to share their knowledge
or ask a question about a metals project. Where else could this
happen??? In the mean time I say to you, stay the course, develop
your look and know that there are alot of us here in Orchid who are
creative & happy people. We have many members who are very wiling to
share what they have learned through years of experiences. We do this
because we love it & get great satifaction from it. We would not
trade this for another job!!!(-:

Sincerely, Jo-Ann Maggiora Donivan
Bright & sunny SF, CA. USA


#12
The thing is, I know I want it to be different....but I don't know
how. I have my head down, working, but not working smart. After my
big debut in town and I have my money in the bank, then what? I am
in need of a career counselor of sorts. Do I go to FIT? Do I fully
equip my studio to work with metal? 

I understand your frustration. I don’t think you want to quit
though. As the other poster said, it sounds like you need to
transition out of beads – I love your beaded work, but it’s so labor
intensive. Perhaps moving into things with a higher perceived value,
such as silver, would improve your profit for time spent.

As to the tiresomeness of production work, that never goes out. Put
on some good music and be glad you’re not in an office, cutting
birthday cake for awful people who don’t even know your name.

Elaine


#13

Kim,

Since you are so close to your season, do what works to bring in $$
into your business for now. Then plan on what you WANT to do in the
future. Spend the time doing what you are good at and what you love.
I learned a huge lesson at Clasp and the importance of this at one of
their seminars.

Save some money from your Christmas season income for the next Clasp
conference and then attend. You won’t regret it.

k

Karen Christians, Director
M E T A L W E R X
School for Jewelry and the Metalarts
50 Guinan St.
Waltham, MA 02451
781 891 3854
www.metalwerx.com


#14
You guys are a good group and I mean that, but you have the
tendency (some) to be a bit discouraging at times. If jewelers are
so dissatisfied with what they are doing, why am I trying so hard
to be one? 

Kim - I am a jeweler because I can’t be anything else. Nothing else
would satisfy my internal desire to produce beauty with gemstones and
metal, and nothing else would satisfy me as a career. I’m not working
FT in that field yet, just aiming towards it. It’s a wonderful goal
to have and I’m having a great time walking on that road. As to why
you hear the negative so often, it is because this list is people
sharing tips to solve problems, not people telling each other what a
wonderful time they are having. For every one person posting I
suspect that ten people are happy with what they accomplished that
day. IMHO.

BBR - Sandi Graves, Beadin’ Up A Storm
Stormcloud Trading Co
St Paul, Minnesota (USA)
651-645-0343


#15

Hi Gang,

As to the tiresomeness of production work, that never goes out.
Put on some good music and be glad you're not in an office, cutting
birthday cake for awful people who don't even know your name. 

One way to reduce the tedium of production work (at least for a
while) is to try to come up with faster more efficient way to do the
job. This often pays big dividends… Don’t stop thinking after just a
little while. I’ve often come up with new ways to do an old task
months, even years after doing it the 1st time. Those 'Aha moments’
are really enjoyable.

Dave


#16
do what works to bring in $$ into your business for now. Then plan
on what you WANT to do in the future.

Karen, that is precisely my problem! I’d like to do more original
work but the dollar beckons. I enjoy custom design (darn, there’s
that over used term again) and it’s profitable but it’s always
someone else’s parameters. Plans keep getting edged out by the
necessity of pleasing someone today, always a deadline looming.
arghh! I’d like to find another five or six hours a day. Maybe I
should raise prices substantially to cut back on the load, free up
some time.


#17

Hi Karen and everyone:

Since you are so close to your season, do what works to bring in
$$ into your business for now. Then plan on what you WANT to do in
the future. 

It would be nearly impossible to write everything I want to say.
This is an odd time for me. I am (essentially) one who has quit in
the past. When I get fairly good at something and start to get very
confident in that, I stop and find something else to do. With
jewelry, I don’t want to do that. It’s a complicated thing for me and
probably sounds quite a bit wacky.

I put my work down that day I wrote my post and walked out. My
deadline for delivery to the Art Center was Friday, but I knew I was
spent. I promptly went out and joined the gym (thanks Doc) which I
love. For the past few weeks, I had been getting down to doing “one
thing”. I can do"one thing" very well, but I over do it. I was not
eating, I was not exercising, I was not seeing people. If I can force
my self to do "two things’ I can break out of that pattern.

I have a little plan now (thanks Karen). I’m going to work(fairly)
hard to meet holiday goals for production. I’m looking into going to
NYC in March? for Designer Day (it’s time to meet people and get out
there) I’m going to set up the studio in the mean time. I’m going to
the gym because it helps me get unstuck. I’m going to try not to make
so many darn plans (too much pressure).

Thank you to everyone who wrote to me on and off list. It really
helps to demystify everything. I have thought so many people know
what they’re doing and where they’re going. Why do they sound so
self-assured when I am not? It is very helpful to know that others
are not all-powerful. I think sometimes, I picture some of the
artists I read about as mysterious all-knowing beings, not normal
people.

Thanks
Kim


#18
Maybe I should raise prices substantially to cut back on the load,
free up some time. 

Actually this is something a lot of Orchidians should be looking at,
especially those who complain they don’t get enough time to do the
things they want to do. In retail you should absolutely be losing
some percentage of your customers because you are too expensive
(because if you aren’t it means you are too cheap). If your work is
in such high demand that you can’t keep up with it and the other
things that you want to make, then you are most assuredly charging
too little. You could always hire help, but that increases your costs
and eventually you are going to have to raise your prices anyway. So
get out there and try it. Raise your prices. I bet that most of you
won’t lose 5% of your customers even if you raise your prices 20%.
After all, if you don’t try it, you won’t know if it will work and
you can always go back down in your pricing if it doesn’t.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
617-234-4392
www.spirerjewelers.com


#19
Maybe I should raise prices substantially to cut back on the load,
free up some time. 

Sounds like a plan, Neil. Do you have the nerve to do it? What I
really mean is, do I?

M’lou Brubaker
Minnesota, USA


#20

Kimberly,

I’ve been thinking about your post a lot.

I feel a little like we’re kindred spirits. We seem to go through the
same journey at times!

I enjoy all of your posts, your enthusiasm, your wisdom and your
ability to find the good in all situations. Your insight has helped
me in the past, and I hope I can someday repay the kindness. Not sure
if it’s today, but I’ll try.

Your jewelry is beautiful. You seem to have found a really great
niche in your neck of the woods, and it’s working. Some would say:
why fix it if it ain’t broke? Well, it doesn’t sound like you are
entirely happy doing tons of the same thing over and over. I feel
your pain!

Personal opinion, take it with a grain of salt, or not at all…
don’t try and change overnight. Ride your success, and your niche,
build on that. If you feel like you develop your your current beaded
style any further, which is already awesome- then maybe try adding
some pieces that still have your sensibilities, but are in a
different medium. There’s no reason why you can’t have two different
"collections".

Try some metal-smithing or wax carving. See how you like it and how
it sells. If you already have fans of your “old” line, they might be
really psyched to see your new items. They might be excited to see
you branching out in different directions.

As far as a fashion school goes, that might be overkill. You don’t
need to learn how to design, you have that down already. Maybe a
class or two in a different technique if you feel you’re lacking in
the skill set needed to expand. Check out local adult schools, night
classes, community colleges. They usually have less expensive
classes so you can get your feet wet. The networking from classes
can be very helpful and motivating as well. Then go for the bigger
buck classes once you’re hooked on a certain technique and feel you
need more guidance.

The first wax class I took was $125 at a local jewelry store. I
sometimes go back and “guest teach” when I need a kick in the pants.
Just getting out of my studio and in that atmosphere is so helpful
to my inspiration and motivation.

Oh, by the way, someone from Orchid contacted me about what wax
carving classes I knew about in the LA area. And we had a chat and
we’re going. to do a trade. I’m going to teach her basic wax carving,
and she’s going to teach me basic soldering, etc… I’ve been
putting off taking a class forever, and then this kinda fell into my
lap. Things happen for a reason. Sometimes you have to open yourself
up to listen to what the universe is trying to tell you. I know that
sounds kinda out there… but I swear it’s true!

Here’s a question or two to think about… What do you want to
make? What inspires you? What inspired you to start making jewelry?
What’s your muse telling you? Or are you too stressed and focused to
listen to her? That happens to me all the time, maybe too often.
Maybe you need to clear your head a little. Take a hike, go to a
museum, take a yoga class, meditate, sit on a hill, under a tree…
do something relaxing that will help you forget about jewelry for an
hour. Or jog-- the pain will get your mind off the jewelry real fast!
That might help bring not only clarity, but also inspiration. I try
to do at least 30 min of recharging a day. Even if it’s just walking
the dog around the neighborhood.

Once you have a new direction, set aside some time to follow it. I
wouldn’t abandon your successful line in one fail swoop. People will
probably come looking for it this Holiday season and you want to
have what they came looking for and perhaps some new work they
didn’t even know they wanted!

And please, don’t be embarrassed. What you’re feeling is very
normal.

Thank you for have the courage to share it with us, because now I
know I’m not the only one!

Best of luck to you, Kim, and please keep us posted.

Find your muse, she’s looking for you!

Best Wishes,
Amery