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Have to go for an MRI


#1

Hi Everybody

Sorry if this has been covered before, but I can’t help but ask
because I am nervous. Back when I ran the marathon, I caused some
trouble in my hip and/or back and have to go for an MRI to see what’s
up. I told them I work with metal, so they are going to do an "orbit"
which I guess is an x-ray of my eyes to look for metal particles. How
did the person who recently also had an MRI make out? Did they find
any metal in your eyes? If they goof and don’t think I have anything
in my eyes and I really do is it just terribly painful? dangerous?

They don’t call me a “nervous little person” for nothing :slight_smile:

Thanks
Kim
Kim Starbard
http://www.kimstarbarddesigns.com


#2

Kim…If you work with non-ferrous metals, you have nothing to worry
about when you go for an MRI. They worry about patients who might
have a steel sliver in an eye, which could be dislodged by the
magnetic force and cause damage to the eye. If you just work in
silver, copper or gold you have nothing to fear.

Dee


#3

I recently had an MRI, and explained that I work with metal. They
asked what I did, and then said there was no need for concern. The
metal workers that are in danger are those that do heavy grinding of
metal, usually day in and day out. . I was assured that the little
grinding that we do with mizzy and other wheels is not considered
dangerous nor is filing of metal, or using steel wool, which I do to
smooth the edges of large copper pieces after filing them.

I came through my MRI just fine. It was a long proceedure and
boring, but other than that it was not uncomfortable–just tedious. .

Kimberly, in your case I believe they are being extra-cautious in
taking the x-ray, and that is all to the good.

Alma


#4

Hi Dee…this has been on my mind for sometime. I didn’t have an
MRI several months ago because I have Interocular Lens Implants from
Cataract removal. They are in both eyes and have tiny springs that
were intended to hold them in place. I had the surgeries over 20
years ago, and would think the springs are metal. (That many years
ago I would not think they are plastic as the person making the
appointment suggested.) The Dr showed me the tiny discs (lens) with
the tiny springs. Do you think this poses a risk?

Rose Marie Christison (with 20/15 vision now)


#5

Kim!

MRI, it was I who had this precautionary “orbit” exam…It is so-o
important, although when I told the MRI folks of my profession, I
was ‘told’ to get an “orbit” exam first…if not ‘don’t come back to
us if you actually go blind under the MRI machine’. “ORBIT” really
means your eye-balls and retina they will not proceed until a
specialist actually exams the x-ray FIRST. if there is any hint of
metal or steel, forget it!!..plain and simple!

MRI means “Magnetic Resenance I…???” this ultra strong magnetic
machine will draw out any metal from the surface of the eye and you
will could loose your eye-sight while under the machine. Do you want
this probem?..in fact the ‘orbit’ exam has to be done 1-2 days prior
to the MRI and they don’t mess around with one week prior. The more
recent, the better. The whole exam lasts for about 30-40 minutes and
they will offer you ear-plugs due to the very LOUD noise it creates
while you are inside this machine…have fun!..

Gerry!


#6

Hi Dee Hi Alma

I recently had an MRI, and explained that I work with metal. They
asked what I did, and then said there was no need for concern. 

Thanks so much for taking the time to help me feel better about
this. It was silly to worry about it anyway.

Thanks!
Kim
Kim Starbard
http://www.kimstarbarddesigns.com


#7

Dear Kim,

I read you question and the subsequent replies and it logically
appears that it is the people who work with iron or steel who need
to worry about such a thing and not those who work with non-ferrous
metals.

However, there is one magnetic precious metal which may cause such a
risk of damage to the eye if a splinter had made its way in, and
that is the fairly new COBALT PLATINUM alloy. If you use this alloy
then it would be a good idea to have a an x-ray of your eyes done.

Helen
Preston, UK


#8

Dear Kim,

I’ve had two in the last six months and have been working on jewelry
since 1971. No problem here. Lower and upper back concerns.

My back is more of a problem than the MRI.

Best Regards & good luck.
Todd Hawkinson


#9
MRI means "Magnetic Resenance I..???" this ultra strong magnetic
machine will draw out any metal from the surface of the eye and
you will could loose your eye-sight while under the machine. 

Hi Gerry…List…

MRI is Magnetic Resonance Imaging…

I sell padlocks to GE Healthcare worldwide… These are used by the
facilities and technician folks in servicing applications in
conjunction with plastic and aluminum lockouts…

The padlocks are all brass…

I’ve also sold them tool sets of beryllium copper (yeah…I know)
and Ampco metal…

There’s stories from the old days of wrenches flying across rooms
and that kind of thing…

Heavy duty magnetics going on…

Gary W. Bourbonais
L’Hermite Aromatique
A.J.P. (GIA)


#10
If you work with non-ferrous metals, you have nothing to worry
about when you go for an MRI. 

Hello Dee and others;

Hate to disagree with you but you’ve forgotten that most people
working with non-ferrous metals are using steel files and sawblades
and often fine steel rotary brushes. I personally have enough bits of
saw blades buried in my fingers to make a magnet on a string swing
back and forth by moving my fingers under it. I don’t know what might
be in my eyes. Although I always wear eye protection, it would be a
risk to have an MRI without precautions.

David L. Huffman


#11

Rose Marie (bursting into song),

There were very few IOLs made with metallic loops, some platinum and
some titanium. They were developed in the US and used in the mid to
late 70’s. During that time it was required to give patients a small
identification card that showed the exact lens description and
permanent office records were well established. On the other hand
any ophthalmologist can have a look with a slit-lamp microscope and
easily identify the metal looped lenses. In addition there was an
attempt to popularize the use of very fine stainless steel suture
material, the attempt failed and it’s use in the US was extremely
rare; that effort came from Holland.

I’m so glad you’ve had good results and hope no ill comes to you.

Dr. Mac