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Flexible shaft CW and CCW rotation


#1

Hello

Beginner. do not understand when do we have to use CW rotation and
CCW rotation? for grinding silver shank ring for exemple. is it just
a question of dust direction?

many thks for every replies
daniel


#2

Daniel

The standard is CW. Drill bits and many other metal cutting bits
work CW. Many newer flex shaft machines can also be operated CCW. CCW
may be desired for some techniques or left hand jewelers. Most
grinding and polishing accessories will work CCW. Some handpieces
like the Foredom #30 will work CCW… but most handpieces will have
some internal parts come apart if used CCW in high torque work like
grinding or polishing.

John
The Jewelry Equipment Dr.


#3
Beginner. do not understand when do we have to use CW rotation and
CCW rotation? for grinding silver shank ring for exemple. is it
just a question of dust direction? 

Mostly, yes. You can control whether the dust and dirt flies towards
your face or towards your bench. But you also have some control when
using things like polishing brushes, where the direction of rotation
can give you better access to some shapes, and give you better
ability to reduce things like drag lines.

However, I wouldn’t recommend spending lots more money on a machine
that offers both directions. Cutters, rotary files, burs, drills,
etc, all need to turn in the one “standard direction”, which is
counter clockwise as you look at the end of the rotating bur. The
other direction is useless for these very commonly used tools. And
with the abrasive tools that can go in either direction, the
advantage of being able to reverse direction is probably over
emphasized by tool dealers. I have never needed it on my flex shaft
machines (which don’t have that option), and never really use it or
find it essential or useful on my micromotor handpiece (which does
offer that option). As I said, there are some things reversing the
direction can be useful for, but it’s a very minor advantage at best.

Peter Rowe


#4

Hi Daniel,

The normal forward direction is counterclockwise and is the only
direction that fluted burs or bits will work. If you use a reverse
clockwise direction when holding the handpiece in your right hand
the dust to fly away from you. However you cannot use a fluted bur or
bit.

Mike Zagielski
Foredom Electric


#5

Since almost all flexshafts go in the same direction its not
something you have to choose.

is it just a question of dust direction 

“I love the taste of silver grindings in the morning. Tastes of
victory”


#6

Hi Daniel,

The normal forward direction is counterclockwise and is the only
direction that fluted burs or bits will work. If you use a reverse
clockwise direction when holding the handpiece in your right hand
the dust to fly away from you. However you cannot use a fluted bur
or bit. 

Mike is 100% right about the bits, burrs & drill bits,

However he forgot to mention 1 thing. If you use any mandrel that
attaches the working part (a cut off disc, a sanding disc, etc) with
a screw, you may be in trouble. The counter clockwise direction may
cause the screw that attaches the disc, etc to the mandrel to loosen
& come off.

Dave


#7

Hi Peter

Many thanks for your reply.

can you tell me what is the best way to catch the dust at the source
using a handpiece Cw with dust going to the bench not oour face, is
placing a big fismouth just in front of the piece is good enough? i
see some pictures of jewelers using a large hose on top of that
piece? what is your way?

thks again
best
daniel


#8

Hi Mike

Many thanks for yur reply. which direction takes the dust when using
a handpiece CW in right hand?

best
daniel


#9

I made a post that said the normal forward direction is CW. Mike at
Foredom made a post that normal forward direction is CCW. I emailed
Mike ofline and we agree that we are both right. My understanding is
standard direction as CW, which is the perspective from the power
tool user’s position such as using a power drill, router, etc. A
flexshaft normal direction (same as a power drill) is named the
opposite. A drill bit is standard CW in a power drill but that same
drill bit rotating the same direction in a Foredom is considered
CCW. Mike explains “We see that the majority of flexible shaft users
check and change their burs while the handpiece in a vertical upright
position with the chuck or collet end of the handpiece facing
towards them viewpoint, hence the forward rotation direction is CCW”.
He makes a very good point.

John
The Jewelry Equipment Dr.


#10

Hi Daniel,

When holding the handpiece in your right hand and running your flex
shaft in the CW or reverse direction the dust and debris flies away
from the user. As Dave mentions mandrels or items on them may come
loose as most of them have right-hand threaded components. Foredom
has made reverse direction mandrels with left-hand threads. We have
a small groove around the bottom of the shank to differentiate them
from normal right-hand threaded or forward directional mandrels. We
have screw mandrels, rubber drum mandrels and tapered mandrels, you
can request them from any Foredom dealer.

Mike


#11

Hmmmm. I’ve used my flex shaft in my left hand for over 40 years. No
dust in my face. No rubber wheels flying off or the little screw on
the mandrel either. No problem with any burrs or drills. Also no
burn marks from the torch on my flex shaft.

Have fun and make lots of jewelry.
Jo Haemer
www.timothywgreen.com


#12

Tried all kinds of methods to stop the dust from the Flexible shaft
motion to be inhaled and be deposited all over me. Finally I found a
perhaps not perfect solution, but it works very well. I have ‘Dazor 3
bulb’ bench lamps for my benches to which I attached “Clear Plastic
Adjustable Hood Shieds”, that are mostly used for polishing machines.
Now the dust and shavings from using burs and sanding disks hits the
shield and falls into my bench drawer instead of all over me and also
my lungs. It works very well and the shield is easily lifted up when
one needs to solder or do other type of work.

Hope this helps!
Sigi