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Filing string


#1

I’m not sure what this tool is called, but basically it’s like floss
with grit on it so that you can file in really tight spaces.

Does anyone know what I’m talking about, and where I can find it?
Rio Grande doesn’t carry it anymore.

Any suggestions for alternatives are also welcome. I’m in Seattle if
anyone knows of a place in this area.

Thanks.


#2

You might try finding it at an auto parts store in the tool section.
I have used it in the past to reach tight spots in stone sculptures
and have always been able to get it at a parts store.

Peace,
Richard


#3

The one I know of is Mitchell’s Abrasive Cord. At
http://www.travers.com the line is product #53-701-049, 050, 052,
152, 154… Search for abrasive cord, and I know other people have
it, too…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#4

Hi,

It is generically called " abrasive cord" or “sanding cord”. If you
go to the McMaster-Carr website and search on either term, you’ll
find it. I’m sure there are lots of other industrial supply type
places that sell it as well, McMaster is just where I have bought it
in the past. It comes in 50’ spools, not really cheap, but 50 feet
goes a long way.

Hope that helps,
Al A.


#5

The activity is called thrumming. Check Gesswein

Elaine

Elaine Luther
Metalsmith, Certified PMC Instructor
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to Find Tools for Metal Clay


#6

polishing mop, It is cotton strings. find some place hardware, big
box depot store any place that sell 100% cotton rope. Buy a 2 foot
section of the largest dia they sell. Unwind the large plys into
separate hanks. It will end up being a little longer than the length
of the rope you started with. When you get them separate you can pull
a bunch of the strings/threads loose and cut about 8 to 10 inches
long so you have something to grip and mix up a slurry of polish or
grinding compound place in the center section and have at it.

been there, took a long time to figure out what the books from
across the pond were talking about. Polishing mops!

glen


#7
I'm not sure what this tool is called, but basically it's like
floss with grit on it so that you can file in really tight spaces. 

Its called abrasive cord/tape, made by EC Mitchell. Small Parts has
a good selection.

http://www.smallparts.com/products/descriptions/ac.cfm#c

P@
www.patpruitt.com


#8

Hi Kathleen,

My mentor used to use strong thick cotton string, slide it over
tripoli or rouge, then thread it through the tight spot and pull it
back and forth. Old fashioned but it works well. If the area is very
rough try a saw blade first.

Mark


#9

I think I have the filing string you’re talking about. It’s called
Mitchell’s polishing cord and it’s still sold by Otto Frei. But
actually I don’t use it anymore since 3M came out with their
microfilm sanding sheets. It can be cut into narrow strips for
getting into small/tight spaces. And it’s tougher than the polishing
cord and doesn’t break.

Bonnie Cooper (from the other side of the Cascades)


#10

Kathleen

The person I was first introduced to this by used string/twine with
lapidary grits imbedded with a little mineral oil. She put little oil
and worked into the string and then rolled the string in the grit and
worked it in. Probably not as good as a commercially bonded product,
but she got good results with it.

Terry


#11

I’m not sure what they’re calling it these days either, but the
process is known as “Trumming”. Trum Cord? Trummers? I don’t know!!!
I used to make them out of leather cord and load them with Tripoli
and Rouge to polish in tight areas. I have since discovered 3M
Radial Discs that are excellent in getting into most tight spaces
and come is sizes that can be used with either a Dremel or on a
standard tapered spindle.

KTN


#12
I'm not sure what this tool is called, but basically it's like
floss with grit on it so that you can file in really tight spaces. 

I use string. I have 4 sizes. It is very usefull. I rub polishing
compund on it. My job would be lot harder without good old fashioned
string.

Phillip


#13

Hi Folks…

You might try finding it at an auto parts store in the tool
section. I have used it in the past to reach tight spots in stone
sculptures and have always been able to get it at a parts store. 

For the life of me, I can’t remember the name of the company that
specializes in making these…

But you can find them in McMaster-Carr…if you don’t have a book,
search their site for abrasive cord…comes in spools…different
grits and sizes…as small as .012"…aluminum oxide or silcon
carbide…

They also have abrasive tapes, but for that I’ve cut santaper belts
thinner…

Gary W. Bourbonais
A.J.P. (GIA)


#14

Kathleen,

There is a triangular building on Olive Way downtown Seattle cross
street is maybe 9th Ave, by where the buses go into the tunnel.
Anyway, it’s a denture manufacturer and I got a box of thin mylar
strips there that are abrasive on one side. They are about a foot
long and 3mm wide and 1200 grit, they are perfect for trumming.

Good luck,
Nanz Aalund


#15

You will find filing string and tape at micromark.com It comes in
120, 180 and 200 grit. Good stuff.

Dee


#16

There have been a number of responses to the question about filing
string. Several have used the term ‘thrumming’ while others use the
term ‘trumming’ .’

To be honest, I have always thought it was ‘thrum’…however, after
due diligence I find the correct term is ‘trum’ as used by Nanz.

A check of anvilfire.com provides the following: trumming or trumming
cord Jeweler’s term. A method of using a cord charged with abrasives
to cut, grind or polish. A trumming cord is made of any size string
or cord with something tacky to hold the abrasive which is then
applied as dust. Braided cords are prefered because they do not
unravel. Abrasive can also be applied directly from stick buffing and
polishing compounds which are already in a was matrix. The ancients
used a similar process using rope or cord to cut stone. The modern
method uses wire.

Commercial abrasisive cord is manufactured similar to abrasive cloth
or belting.

Ah hah and cheers from Don at The Charles Belle Studio in SOFL where
simple elegance IS fine jewelry!


#17

We have been using twill tape for many years with great success. You
buy it at any fabric store, it comes in several widths and is quite
durable.

John