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Experience with carl ziess binocular magnifiers


#1

Hello,

Has anybody had any experience with the Carl Ziess binocular
magnifiers or anything like it? My optivisor is great for some
things but while setting i need the something more powerful and i
never could get the hang of gripping the old fashioned loupe in my
eye socket. I don’t wear glasses (yet) and the setting microscopes
look dauntingly expensive, so the Ziess looks a convenient option.

Thanks from an ageing, round shouldered, back aching, vision failing
bench monkey


#2

Steven,

I’ve got a set of those, and I absolutely love them. Not cheap, but I
don’t regret a penny of it.

They sent me the headband and two pairs of binocular loupes to try,
no obligation – I selected the 6x250 and the 4.5x250. The 6x set
were sweet, but the field of view was very small, and I could see
every heartbeat, just trying to hold still. The 4.5x had a wider
field of view and although I wasn’t seeing it as big, the work was
eminently clear and easy to manipulate. I sent back the 6x set and
paid for the 4.5x and the headband, and I’ve been using them for
several years now.

Boiled down: I love them, and I’d buy them again in a heartbeat.

Loren
http://www.golden-knots.com


#3

Hello Steven

after much thought and debate I took the plunge and bought an
Orascoptic, it is the dental industry standard for the surgeons
binocular… I had looked at the Zeiss and they are spectacular, but
at around 2500 to 3000 they were a little pricey but well worth the
money,I happened to be at my dentist and they were all using the
Orascoptic, I tried one on and it was phenomenal, so I got the number
and they came to the studio for a fitting and measure and a quick eye
check up to see what I may need as to a binocular, I bought mine in
2005 and I do not use my optivisor any more … the head aches are
gone, and so is the neck ache from bending forward. the Orascoptic is
a Kerr company for the dental industry, and have been very user
friendly.I looked at quite a lot of different makes and models (Lieca
was another), I would have gone with Zeiss but having the model and
sample in hand (Orascoptic), trying it on and have all that for about
900.00 was the deal maker for me. the nice thing about these are also
that if your eyes change they will come readjust the lenses to your
eyes. the Binocular are custom fit to your eyes and head measure
permanantly. if you can not find there info on line let me know off
list and i will send you there info.best 900.00 I spent in my shop
for a tool that has made working life a joy and a lot more precise.

cheers
Hratch Babikian


#4

Hi Steven,

I have used the Carl Ziess G3 binocular loupe for about 8 years now.
I cannot speak highly enough of them, particularly when contrasted
to an optivisor.

Main advantages I have found are :-

a) optical clarity (well they are ziess lenses!)

b) comfortable and a very low weight

c) the ability to “look past” the binoculars without any adjustment

d) Focal length - the focal point is around 25 - 30 centimetres
which is advantageous when contrasted to an optivisor.

I use them constantly, in fact I put them on at the same time as my
apron and take them off at the end of the day. Magnification is more
than adequate for faceting and enamel placement.

No association, just a very satisfied user.

Kind regards
Don Iorns


#5

I use Ziess binocular loupes and love them. They are not inexpensive
but they are by far the best optics you can wear around the shop.
Microscopes offer greater magnification but at 4x (equal to a #10
optivisor) I have all the magnification I need for the vast majority
of jobs and unlike a microscope they are with me wherever I am in the
studio.

Jim
James Binnion
James Binnion Metal Arts


#6

I have tried it. What I found out that, at least for me, the blocking
of light from the top provided by optivisor is more important that
actual magnification. One thing I found useful is when precise work
required at larger distance like in chasing, binocular are better.
For bench work I stick with optivisor.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#7

It’s a bit late for this year, but there is usually a German vendor
at GJX in Tucson who sells such products. You could find out the name
through the Tucson Show Guide. Please let us know what decision you
make. Carl Ziess has always made wonder camera lens.

KPK


#8

If you’ll check the archives there was a discussion on this topic.
James Binnion had something to say about what he uses. For those not
acquainted with Jim, his comments are well worth reading.

KPK


#9

Steven,

I have used the Ziess loupes for over 15 years now. I’ve got the 4x
with a 300mm focal length. They are expensive but worth it. They
will change the way you work.

Give me a call or e-mail with any specific questions you might have.

David Lee, CMBJ
http://www.davidleejeweler.com


#10

Hi Steven,

I’ve had mine for at least five years and I think they’re fabulous!
I couldn’t do without them.

Linda


#11

I use Eschenbach 3x Loupe binocular magnifiers for delicate setting
operations. The clarity and good working distance make them superior
to the single lens headband I use for general work

The binoculars have a narrower field of view so are less suitable
for general work, but for that special occasion they are definately
worth it.


#12
I happened to be at my dentist and they were all using the
Orascoptic, I tried one on and it was phenomenal, so I got the
number and they came to the studio for a fitting and measure and a
quick eye check up to see what I may need as to a binocular, I
bought mine in 2005 and I do not use my optivisor any more.. 

Hratch - What is the working distance for the 'Orascoptic?


#13

Don,

Hratch mentioned a ball park figure for Zeiss; what was your
price? 

Another question: What is the field of view? I’ve been using a Meiji
binocular microscope for engraving. Even at the lowest magnification
the field of vision is very small. It works beautifully for a piece
about 25 -30 mm.

I’m now engraving a larger piece, a bracelet. It’s not impossible
with the microscope; but engraving something that large, about six
inches long, causes certain problems. One must pay close attention to
the point of the graver; but also keep a larger view in mind. An
optivisor (#4) works somewhat; but I’m looking for a better
solution.

An analogy for the process; I at one time gave driving lessons and
noticed new drivers jerked the steering wheel nervously. I looked at
the face of the student and noticed that the student was looking
just in front of the hood. I said don’t look there look as far down
the road as you can. Solved the problem. It’s the same with
engraving:
if not keeping where you’re going in sight you get a jerky line
instead of a smooth line. Your feedback would be helpful in making a
decision. For those interested in engraving there are wonderful
forums on-line I just haven’t found the answer so far to this one;
but then I very much a beginner engraver.

KPK


#14

Steven,

I purchased the Ziess lenses several years ago while I was a student
at New Approach School. Blaine Lewis uses them, so I knew they had to
be good. Anyway, I love them! They are a bit heavy, but the optics
are so incredibly clear. I have middle-aged eyes and wear bifocal
contacts, so really felt I needed something better than an optivisor.
The Ziess lenses are expensive, but so worth the price.

Bonnie Cooper


#15
I use Ziess binocular loupes and love them. They are not
inexpensive but they are by far the best optics you can wear around
the shop. Microscopes offer greater magnification but at 4x (equal
to a #10 optivisor) I have all the magnification I need for the
vast majority of jobs and unlike a microscope they are with me
wherever I am in the studio. 

Jim I just posted a question related to this question.

If my description was adequate -the breadth of field combined with
magnification-do you think the Zeiss would be appropriate? And you
you know what the current price is?

Thanks
Kevin


#16
I have tried it. What I found out that, at least for me, the
blocking of light from the top provided by optivisor is more
important that actual magnification. 

Leonid, I understand what you’re saying about the optivisor. It’s
very helpful in excluding some light and for me, helps focuses my
attention. But perhaps I’ve missed something here, but can you get
enough working distance between the microscope and the work you’re
chasing?

KPK


#17
I have used the Ziess loupes for over 15 years now. I've got the 4x
with a 300mm focal length. They are expensive but worth it. They
will change the way you work. 

I’ve been asking questions of many about this. I seem to receive my
emails later than others on Orchid. Maybe that I’m in the wilds of
northern NM.

In any case David, just to make sure, you’re talking about almost
12" working distance?

KPK


#18

Thanks Loren, Leonid, Don, James, Leonid, Kevin, David and Linda.
Well i guess the Zeiss is pretty good then. I think i need a
magnifier with the power of a normal handheld 10x loupe with a focal
length of around ten inches so if Zeiss do one this powerful that’s
probaly the way to go, though i am intrigued by the posting by
Hratch who recommended a Orascoptic with the company actually coming
out to measure you up to make sure you get what you need ( or maybe i
just like the idea of pretending to be a surgeon on my day off.)

Thanks again
Regards to you all, Steven


#19

The Orascoptic web site has an easy to understand explanation of the
basicsof magnification, including diopters vs. magnifying power,
prismatic vs Galilean systems, depth of field and width, etc.

http://tinyurl.com/d7rzlm

Jamie


#20
What is the working distance for the 'Orascoptic?

From their web site: Working Distances:

Short: 10 to 15 in (26 to 38 cm)
Regular: 12 to 17 in (30 to 43 cm)
Long: 14 to 19 in (36 to 48 cm)
XLong: 16 to 21 in (40 to 53 cm)
XXLong: 18 to 23 in (45 to 58 cm)