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Engraved lines in wax


#1

I do a lot of engraving on blue wax. Sometimes I need to get a
better look at how the engraved lines look. I mix talcum powder
with water and paint it on the wax. Once the mixture dries a light
sanding with a sanding sponge removes the talc from the high spots
leaving the lines filled with white talc. Things show up in the
talc filled lines that would never be revealed by looking at the
lines directly. I would imagine that the talc water mixture could
be dyed with ink to give a greater contrast on any lines carved in
light colored wax like Kate Wolfe’s silver wax. The talc can be
removed from the lines with a little soap and an electric
toothbrush.

If anyone is interested I can send a photo showing the talc effect.

Lee Epperson


#2
I do a lot of engraving on blue wax.  Sometimes I need to  get a
better look at how the engraved lines look.

Hi Lee;

A few months ago there were several threads on what type powder to
use as a rubber mold air release substance.

Someone (I believe it was Mr. Rowe) He also said something about
CAD/CAM taking longer three or four weeks to pickup. (Jeezh is this
guy ever wrong,) I’ll save that for another post!!! any way he
suggested plain old corn starch and guess what, he was right, Corn
Starch seems to have a finer grain structure or is just mulled much
finer than Jewelers talc, and since it also cleans out of mold air
vents easier, I wonder if maybe it would work better as a disclosing
agent than talc while carving or engraving on wax, also doesn’t
China White work to or is it too hard to get off the high spots.
Besides being expensive as all get out, Conversely will the talk and
water work on metal which I often use gravers on…

Ken Ferrell
www.shadras.com


#3

Lee

I’ve used China White to do the same thing with wax projects, and it
can be dyed to any color as well. I’ve carve quite a few highly
detailed medallions and intricate line work on animals… the
contrast in color really makes a visual difference. When making a
living as a wax carver & jewelry design illustrator for over 20
years it really helps to discover these great tips !

Thanks,
Margie Mersky
http://www.mmwaxmodels.com


#4

Continue from:
https://orchid.ganoksin.com/t/engraved-lines-in-wax

Ken,

I am unfamiliar with China white. I am not sure if it is water
soluble.

I am a crash and bang kind of person. I got the notion that a white
paste would be great to fill in engraved lines in blue wax and make
them show up better. A quick look around my shop and there was my
talc. If it works use it.

Using talc and water on metal may not fill the lines adequately.
You might need a more permanent ink.

Lee Epperson


#5
Someone (I believe it was Mr. Rowe) He also said something about
CAD/CAM taking longer three or four weeks to pickup. (Jeezh is
this guy ever wrong,) 

I’m wrong? could be. Actually, I’m not even sure it was me who
objected to your claim of quick learning. Maybe, but my main
experience with CAD is peripheral. I’ve yet, after several years of
occasionally fooling the Rhino, actually managed to learn it well
enough to be really useful to me. Others’ experience, with more
dilligent study, may vary. But my opinion is colored as well by
familiarity with the graduate program in metals and jewelry at Tyler
School of art in Philadelphia. There, most graduate level work is
done concentrating on CAD/CAM and RP methods, and I know those very
bright young grad students spend a LOT of time learning and mastering
CAD/CAM and RP methods, all in the intense and competative
environment of an MFA program, and most of them take the full two
years, or more, to really become fluently masters of the technology
and software. They’re making simpler objects, of course, within
their first semester or even first few weeks. But “simpler” is the
operative word here, rather than fully having mastered the medium.
Perhaps part of the question is just what level of skill and mastery
you define as having learned the skills. Want to make a simple cigar
type wedding band with no details? That will probably take you less
than a day, maybe just a couple hours, to learn to make. But that
would hardly even be considered baby steps…

I'll save that for another post!!! any way he suggested plain old
corn starch and guess what, he was right, Corn Starch seems to have
a finer grain structure or is just mulled much finer than Jewelers
talc 

I’m not sure I actually suggested corn starch. What I believe I
mentioned was that standard drug store type Baby Powder, often
thought of as talc, is these days made of corn starch, not talc,
since actual talc is often contaminated with asbestos, and is thus
considered a carcinogen.

By the way, another materials you might try for various powdering
applications is mica powder. Not so much, I’d think, for injecting
waxes, but it works quite well with the vulcanizable silicone rubbers
that are packed like a stiff clay in the mold, if you wish to make a
poweder seperated mold that you essentially just tear apart again
after vulcanizing, instead of cutting. Mica, being very flat little
platelets, when used as a seperating powder, would tend to coat a
surface rather better than powders that are blockier particles. So
it makes a better seperating agent for such uses. I don’t think I’d
want it on a mold during wax injection, though, as if incorporated
into the wax, it’s something that doesn’t burn out, and might remain
in the mold cavity during casting. Perhaps not a concern, but why
bother. Contenti, among other sources, carries mica powder if you
wish.

Peter


#6

Lee:

China white is water soluble, it comes in a small block or cake and
you can just very slightly dampen your finger tip, rub it on the
cake and wipe it on your wax it will fill the engraved lines, the
man that started me engraving ( a skill I sure wish I was half good
at ) used to wet his by spitting on his finger tip, I believe a
sponge to be a trifle more sanitary

In it=92s intended function, it is used on metal to facilitate the
drawing of pencil lines for engraving layout directly on metal,
applied quite thin to the metal it won=92t flake off as you or when
you draw or engrave on it .

The only draw back is it is quite expensive, a small cake about =BE by
1/2 is around 15 dollars, But it lasts quite a while, my piece was
bought from Swest about 8 or 9 years ago, and I’ve done quite a bit
of lay out work with it and still have a decent portion left. I tried
some on a piece of wax I attacked with an 18 liner and it picked up
the lines quite well even where I cut a few very light spirals.

I would never have thought of checking my engraving lines that way
glad I had time to peruse my Orchid for a change. It should prove a
valuable technique for checking wax coming off my mill,

Kenneth Ferrell
www.shadras.com


#7
also doesn't China White work to or is it too hard to get off the
high spots. Besides being expensive as all get out, Conversely will
the talk and water work on metal which I often use gravers on.. 

For engraving on either metal or wax, I will check the progress of
the work with a light dusting of cornstarch baby powder, filtered
through a little cheesecloth “pouce” bag. That is simply a few
layers of cheesecloth stacked up, filled with powder and gathered at
the top to create a little pouch of powder. A light tap over the
work will produce a fine layer of sifted powder, and will eliminate
the shine from metal or wax. It will be easier to spot the highs
and lows against a matte surface, and brushes off easily with a
toothbrush, and a little running water if necessary.

If you need more contrast, or something a little more durable than
the powder, you can try black Sharpie markers to hi-light the high
points (washes off with alcohol or wax cleaner), or use white
gouache in place of Chinese White. Chinese White is simply a white
watercolor pigment; gouache is more dense in the pigment content,
cheaper, and comes in a wide variety of colors. Pick your favorite!

Melissa Veres, Engraver
@M_Veres


#8

China white is watercolor paint, and it’s pretty cheap if you buy it
at a discount art supply store. I paid less than US$5 at Pearl for
a cake of it.

~kara