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Determining ear wires length


#1

I have a pair of earrings I bought long, long ago as a teenager. The
ear wires broke, so I replaced them. Simple enough. But when I wear
them they take turns jumping out of my ear! I don’t make heavy
earrings myself, but I am guessing, as these are somewhat heavy,
that something is off in the relationship between the ear wires I put
on the size/weight of the earrings themselves.

Any suggestions on how to determine what length/weight/type of ear
wire to use for heavy or long earrings? I simply haven’t run into
this before on any of the many earrings I have made myself. I prefer
NOT using posts for these, they really need the dangle type ear wire
I think.

Thanks in advance.
Beth in SC where we are getting much needed rain…and actually had
some thunder this morning


#2

hey all first reply and dont really got a clue, but why not try a
sheppards crook. friend of mine makes em from silver. just wrap
around a pencil is right diameter unless ur profesional. you could
also do a small clasp to stop it coming undone. anyways cheers from
aus.

jim


#3

I find that earwires that are shaped more like a “V” as opposed to a
"U" tend to come out of my ears. V.


#4

Beth- The ear wires, if they are the shepherd hook style, must always
be longer than the earring itself. If not the earrings tip and fall
out. This is a common mistake that even big manufacturers make. Just
like the bottom of the shank of a ring must be thinner than the top
of the ring or the top will bend first thus loosing stones. Enjoy
your earrings.

jo


#5

Beth,

Have you tried using just the little plastic backs for the ear wires
to hold them in place?

Rachel Howard
THEeBeadStore.com


#6
The ear wires, if they are the shepherd hook style, must always be
longer than the earring itself.

in this case that would make the ear wires about 3" long…I’ve
never seen any that long myself, so there must be another answer! I
have some heavy earrings from Russia, and their ear wires are not as
long as they are, but they stay in fine. Beats me.

Beth in SC


#7
Have you tried using just the little plastic backs for the ear
wires to hold them in place?

Well that is a big DUH! I have those and never even thought of
it…big sigh. Obviously trying to give up caffeine is NOT working!

Thanks!
Beth in SC


#8
The ear wires, if they are the shepherd hook style, must always be
longer than the earring itself. If not the earrings tip and fall
out. This is a common mistake that even big manufacturers make. 

Additionally, be sure that the small curve that the dangle itself
hangs from is situated under the center of the arc that is in the
earlobe. This changes the center of gravity so that the dangle weight
is below the earlobe instead of in front of it, reducing the tip-out
force. To do this, when shaping the curve for the earlobe, instead of
a 1/2 circle, make the arc almost 2/3 of a circle.

Hope this helps.
Pam Chott
www.songofthephoenix.com


#9

ive not had much success in the earwire dept until i made earrings
that were light in weight. part of the problem depends on the pierced
hole in the ear lobe itself. if the hole is opened up too much
sometimes bigger wire helps but some earlobes have been at the mercy
of too many negative incidents, babies ripping out earrings, pet
birds, hair brush accidents and falling down drunk etc. so surgery
and repiercing might be the only answer for some folks - goo


#10

Greetings

On the topic of ear wires falling out- I feel the most important
thing to consider is balance. I get my wires from a supplier in
Bali. They are thick and shaped like a question mark without the dot.
The business end has a little ball. No matter how heavy the earring
dingle is this hook has not fallen out. It also does not poke the
wearer behind the ear lobe. The only problem for some people is the
thickness of the wire. Those with thin or tender lobes do not like
this wire. I am thinking of making my own but they are quite
reasonable from my source.

Jean in Minnesota


#11

Beth,

Someone suggested the plastic ear nuts, which is a very good idea. I
don’t usually use them personally for the little wire earrings I make
& wear, but I know a lot of people won’t wear that type of earring
without them, so I always include them in the sale. Here’s my idea,
though… Could you also try making the part that goes through your
ear have a sharper bend on at least the back side of the ear lobe?
Often when I make earrings with ear wires, I bend the wire not into a
smooth curve, but rather with two (or at least one) 90 degree bends.
A wire bent that sharply at the back of the earlobe is less likely to
just slide its way out. Just like if you put beads on that same wire-
if it’s just curved, they’d slide off pretty easily, but if bent 90
degrees, they are trapped on there. Just another idea for you. :slight_smile:

Lisa
Designs by Lisa Gallagher
www.lisagallagher.com


#12

In my experience, if the ear wire on a long hanging earring is
stiff-- that is, no jump ring or a tight jr connection-- an earring
can lever out when it is pushed against the shoulder or neck. I
always include those little foam or plastic plugs/stoppers that slide
on the ear wire of my hnaging earrings. (those without closures.) I
insist on it…

Andy


#13
Additionally, be sure that the small curve that the dangle
itself hangs from is situated under the center of the arc that is
in the earlobe. This changes the center of gravity so that the
dangle weight is below the earlobe instead of in front of it,
reducing the tip-out force. To do this, when shaping the curve for
the earlobe, instead of a 1/2 circle, make the arc almost 2/3 of a
circle. 

Great advice, and explains why my combo french hook/post earrings
sometimes come out (hooks soldered to the back of the earring like a
post, but without the annoying and easily lost clutches and stabbing
little posts). I would add that when the hooks are too long in back,
they may push against the neck during movement, phone calls, etc, and
push themselves out too easily. I have not heard of an
"earringweight-earwire length" ratio, but I am beginning to agree
that correct balance (under the ear rather than in front of it) may
make the biggest difference in stability.

Lisa


#14

The idea of having a double curve is a very old one. There are
earrings that were found in Pompei, that have a double S curve to the
wires. They look ‘odd’ to our eyes, but they don’t work their way of
the ear.