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Cool intarsia website


#1

On another thread, a member named John mentioned some of the old
greats in the Indian Jewelry business. Most would say the greatest
of them all was Charles Loloma (I would…) So, for old times sake I
googled him, and just by chance happened onto a gold-mine of
Everything you ever wanted to know about inlay and
intarsia. Check it out:

http://www…americanmastersofstone.com


#2
http://www..americanmastersofstone.com 

wow, just wow. thank you so much for sharing this- especially the
work of Charles Loloma who I had never heard of until the other
gentleman’s post a few days ago. wow.

Hope
NSW, AU


#3
http://www..americanmastersofstone.com 

Very cool web site John. Great images of Loloma’s work.

But I don’t think many would consider Charles’ lapidary as intarsia
as that web site does.

KPK


#4

I do intarsia and inlay and have been a fan of this website for
several years. now too. There are scores of beautiful stonework on
the site, but IMO the best example of intarsia is Nicolai Medvedev’s
work. Hands down, the most incredible intarsia you’ll ever lay eyes
on!


#5

I’ve seen this site. Some of those pieces take several years of near
full time work to make.


#6
But I don't think many would consider Charles' lapidary as
intarsia as that web site does. 

Yeah, Kevin - he was the best, though, whatever it’s called. Just by
way of conversation…

I posted a tour of an Italian stone shop on my blog, lately. A
couple of comments took great pains to clarify the labels (which I
approved…). That’s what went wrong with the music business - first
it needed labels and genres and after that it had to have music that
fit into the cubbyholes in order to function. {Heavy Sigh…}

Back when I ran the inlay shop we called it all inlay, though we
made a distinction between stone-on-metal and stone-on-stone. If
stone was cut into shapes to fit, we called it all inlay. Loloma was
one who defied labels, which is part of his appeal. Freedom with
stone in it’s highest form.

… As with most things, it’s the consumers who need the labels - the
artists usuallly don’t much care…Just conversation…

http://www.donivanandmaggiora.com


#7

When I lived in Tesuque NM in the early seventies I had the good
luck to meet Loloma when he was exhibiting at a Santa Fe gallery. He
was a gentle, warm, gifted individual. His work ‘blew me away’.

John, I point out the incorrect use of the term simply as a form of
communication. If one is looking at the work it’s not as important.
But if one is trying to communicate in writing it’s good to use
standard definitions to convey info. There are lots of beginners on
this forum or people uninformed about lapidary; They may as well
start with correct terms.

In Italy there’s a long tradition of ‘pietra dura’. It would be a
shame if that term is lost.

ciao
Kevin


#8

I have been very interested in learning some intarsia. Do you know of
any websites that actually talk about how to DO it, even just some
simple techniques for beginners? I would love to play some with
this, learn a little something new. Thanks in advance!


#9

There is a website showing craftspeople in Morroco doing tile work.
If I can recall the address, I will post it. It’s not meant as a ‘how
to’; but does suggest how some of their techniques could be used in
intarsia.

The most important tool, it seems to me, would be a lapidary
’router’. There are lapidaries doing work at a very sophisticated
level but do not publicly discuss their techniques.

KPK


#10
Do you know of any websites that actually talk about how to DO it,
even just some simple techniques for beginners? 

Click on the “How To” button…

On another thread, a member named John mentioned some of the old
greats in the Indian Jewelry business. Most would say the greatest of
them all was Charles Loloma (I would…) So, for old times sake I
googled him, and just by chance happened onto a gold-mine of
Everything you ever wanted to know about inlay and
intarsia.

Check it out: http://www.americanmastersofstone.com


#11
Check it out: http://www.americanmastersofstone.com 

I just checked it out and quickly, meaning I may have skipped over
some of the details, read the instructions for intarsia. I was
impressed, not that that means a whole lot.

Intarsia has been around for a long time and done with the simplest
of tools. Technology, though, has come up with tools that make the
process easier in some ways. One is a diamond band saw. Inland makes
one that is reasonably priced which Rio carries.

A tool and technique that may not readily come to mind is a trim saw
and to use the blade to shape the edge of a stone rather than simply
sawing a straight cut. As with a lot of things the fineness of your
technique is what largely determines the success of your project.

KPK