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Argentium Sterling Silver - tarnish resistance


#1
I have recently purchased A silver from Stueller... nice
product... Understand that it 'Resist' tarnishing.... that's why I
used it!... Question is...'for how long? what can I expect from a
finished product?? 

Jim

Argentium Sterling Silver has been tarnish tested using an
International Standards Organisation Test ISO 4538: 1995
(Thioacetamide tarnish test). The test was carried out independently
by CATRA (Cutlery and Allied Trades Research Association) in the UK.
The Thioacetamide test requires samples to sit in an enclosed, gas
tight chamber that contains a saturated solution of sodium acetate
tri-hydrate and Thioacetamide, distributed on a horizonal plate,
within the chamber (50mg per square decimetre of surface). This
ensures that the test atmosphere contains volatile suphides for the
duration of the test, with a relative humidity of 75% at 20+/-5=B0C
within the sealed container. At the end of the test the standard
sterling sample had tarnished severely and the Argentium sample
remained clean.

Please let me know if you would like a copy of the report and I can
e-mail the document to you.

Peter


#2

Dear Peter John

If you could give us copy of the report we would really appreaciate
it

Kumar


#3

Perhaps a good comparison would be Argentium and ordinary Sterling
alloyed with Copper in a side by side test. This would establish how
much longer Argentium would resist tarnishing.

Daniel Ballard


#4

Greetings All. I have an interest in this product because of its
resistance to tarnish which has been attested to by at least two
members of the Orchid group. Thank you both for your input.

However it was mentioned previously in this thread that Argentium
sterling is softer than standard sterling and this begs a question
which has yet to be asked.

How resistant to abrasion is Argentium Sterling? A strong resistance
to tarnish may mean little if the surface is susceptible to abrasion
and could limit the use of this product to pieces that are not
subject to rough duty.

Can this product be hardened by heat treating or work hardening to
achieve a degree of hardness that is similar to standard sterling?

I would also like to know if there is any nickle in this alloy? I
only ask this question because some people have an allergy to
nickle. If I need to ask a customer if they have an allergy to
nickle I would not be averse to asking if the question is warranted.
After all many customers have limited knowledge concerning gems and
jewelry and they count on us to look out for their interests and are
appreciative when they realize that we are fulfilling that
obligation.

I am not trying to run down a new product by asking these questions.
I realize that no product is perfect and we work with the
shortcomings inherent in the products we use (i.e. firescale on
standard sterling, stones that cleave when setting, torches that
fizzle, spit and pop ect…) but these are known shortcomings and we
take steps to mitigate their effects. With a new product such as
this the inherent shortcomings are not known and only by asking
specific questions can we begin to make an honest assessment of
where to employ this product to it’s best advantage. Thanking all
who respond ahead of time.

Best regards,
David L. Smith,

currently in rainy San Fransisco attending the Revere Academy for yet
more training in the jewelry arts.


#5
However it was mentioned previously in this thread that Argentium
sterling is softer than standard sterling and this begs a question
which has yet to be asked. 

Hello David,

Hopefully Peter Johns will respond to your questions but the
"Technical Guide" section at ArgentiumSilver.com does have some
answers. For instance the Guide states that precipitation hardening by
quenching or air hardening “will achieve a hardness of approximately
120HV” which is a similar rating to “aged” or kiln treated silver.

I remember hearing or reading recently that the Argentium alloy will
work harden slightly harder than sterling’s 140-180HV. Sorry but the
exact source of that info has slipped my mind.

I can’t comment on the nickel question because I simply don’t know. I
certainly hope not. Again, hopefully Peter is reading and will
comment.

FWIW I contacted Peter via peter.johns@argentiumsilver.com and found
him most helpful. In fact he called me long distance and spent 45
minutes answering every question I had and then some, all on his
dime! I believe he would welcome your questions too. I understand
that he is on the road at the moment so it might take him a couple
days to respond.

Cheers,
Trevor F.


#6
   How resistant to abrasion is Argentium Sterling? 

Annealed hardness is equal to standard sterling silver. Further
hardening can be achieved by simple heat treatment (even after
soldering). (Do not confuse increased ductility and malleability with
fragility.) The Stern-Leach folks say: “Argentium is capable of
achieving hardness levels twice those of standard sterling silver,
making it more dent-resistant.”

Can this product be hardened by heat treating or work hardening to
achieve a degree of hardness that is similar to standard sterling?

Precipitation harden by heating the alloy at 580F/300C for
approximately 30-45 minutes and air cool to room temperature. Note
that there is no problem with heating it for longer. Since my
kitchen oven only goes to 555 degrees F, so I heat mine for an hour
at 550.

  I would also like to know if there is any nickle in this alloy? 

There is no nickel in the alloy.

Cindy
www.cynthiaeid.com