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Yellower 18k gold alloy


#1

I have thought of another question I have, is there any sort of
alloy that would make 18k gold more yellow, I realize that it must be
stamped 18k, but I want it to be more rich, and more yellow more
like that of a 24k gold… Thank you James for your answer on my
first question, that was very helpful!

Danielle


#2

Danielle,

There is a 18k dark yellow gold (also available in 20-22k) alloy that
you can buy that is very rich in color. I use the one from United
Precious Metal Refining (http://www.unitedprm.com). Otherwise, 22K
YG does the trick. There is a way one can put a 24k gold finish on
the 18k (like Indian gold), but I don’t know how to do that. If
anyone knows how, it would be helpful!

Good luck,
Janet


#3

OK, Orchidians - To call this a trade secret is too lofty - let’s
say it’s “my little secret”. I did work for a store that was all
18kt., and they wanted the whole store inventory to have a uniform
color, so they told me their blend. It’s probably about as near to
22kt. color as you can get in 18 - just enough copper to take the
green tint off from the silver, and it casts and works and polishes
beautifully. I guess Orchid’s been good to me —

The alloy is simply 80% fine silver and 20% copper, which works out
to 40 dwt silver, 10 dwt copper - or 20 dwt silver, 5 dwt copper, of
course. For those who don’t know, I’ll point out that you always
melt the alloy metals together first - I often even melt them into a
button and clean them, and then remelt it and pour it into a bucket
of water to get shot. Check it out…

@John_Donivan


#4
There is a 18k dark yellow gold (also available in 20-22k) alloy
that you can buy that is very rich in color. 

This is simply done by plating. Some refer to it as giving a warmer
color to the finished piece. You could use 24K plating to achieve the
look as long as you stamp your piece correctly as in 18K

Allan Creates
P.O. Box 51 Cote St-Luc
Montreal Quebec
Canada
Tel: 514-488-7553
Fax: 514-489-7299
http://www.superringfit.com
Perfectly Fabulous Fit Arthritic Shanks


#5

John,

The alloy is simply 80% fine silver and 20% copper, 
I use a higher copper ratio: 15% fine silver and 10% copper to 75%

fine gold. The color is only slightly redder, but the alloy is a bit
harder that the 20%Cu / 5%Au alloy suggested. You can easily
depletion guild this alloy by allowing an oxide to form, then
removing it in the pickle. I pre-polish the piece, but do not rouge
polish it. Then heat it WITHOUT ANY FLUX to get a black oxide. When
you remove it from the pickle, it looks just like 22k. Rouge polish
of use a soft brass brush to polish it.

This alloy is great for casting and rolling. It will work harden

very quickly. Great for ring shanks, but a bear for bezel setting.
Takes some getting used to, but I love the color. It may look like
22k, but it sure doesn’t work like 22k. One of the things I love
about working with gold is that there are SO many alloy
possibilities.

Doug

Douglas Zaruba
33 N. Market St.
Frederick, MD 21701
301 695-1107
@Douglas_Zaruba


#6
The alloy is simply 80% fine silver and 20% copper

I must be dense, but I’m having trouble understanding how an 80/20
coin silver alloy yields an 18k gold alloy?

James in SoFl


#7

James in SoFl,

I think that is a reference to the ratio of the alloys added to pure
gold in order to get the yellower mix. I’m amused by the issue of
proprietary blends however as there are numerous books that offer
alloy ratios to achieve these types of color in gold.

Daniel R. Spirer, G.G.
Daniel R. Spirer Jewelers, LLC
1780 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
@Daniel_R_Spirer
www.spirerjewelers.com


#8
I must be dense, but I'm having trouble understanding how an 80/20
coin silver alloy yields an 18k gold alloy? 

1 part 80/20 coin silver alloy to three parts gold.

Lee Einer
Dos Manos Jewelry
http://www.dosmanosjewelry.com


#9

Hi Doug,

      You can easily depletion guild this alloy by allowing an
oxide to form, then removing it in the pickle. I pre-polish the
piece, but do not rouge polish it. Then heat it  WITHOUT ANY FLUX
to get a black oxide. When you remove it from the pickle, it looks
just like 22k. Rouge polish of use a soft brass brush to polish it. 

Thank you SO much for your explanation. I’ve been trying to figure
out how to do this!

Janet


#10
       OK, Orchidians - To call this a trade secret is too lofty -
let's say it's "my little secret".  I did work for a store that was
all 18kt., and they wanted the whole store inventory to have a
uniform color, so they told me their blend.  It's probably about as
near to 22kt. color as you can get in 18 - just enough copper to
take the green tint off from the silver, and it casts and works and
polishes beautifully.  I guess Orchid's been good to me --- The
alloy is simply 80% fine silver and 20% copper, which works out to
40 dwt silver, 10 dwt copper - or 20 dwt silver, 5 dwt copper, of
course. 

OK, I’ll bite. I thought 18K was applied only to gold alloy, not
silver alloy. John, did you mean 80% GOLD and 20% copper? I don’t
play with alloying metals, but do like to understand the concept.
Help me out,

Judy in Kansas


#11
OK, I'll bite.  I thought 18K was applied only to gold alloy, not
silver alloy.  John, did you mean 80% GOLD and 20% copper?  I
don't play with alloying metals, but do like to understand the
concept. Help me out, 

Judy in Kansas

He clearly stated that it was the percentage of the mix for the
alloy (to be mixed in the pure gold) to make 18K yellow gold with,
that has color as close as possible to 22K when finished.

Allan Creates
P.O. Box 51 Cote St-Luc
Montreal Quebec
Canada
Tel: 514-488-7553
Fax: 514-489-7299
http://www.superringfit.com
Perfectly Fabulous Fit Arthritic Shanks


#12

Yes (see thread), the alloy is 80% silver and 20% copper. After you
make the alloy, then you get 75% gold, and mix with that 25% of
the alloy you made…