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YAK finding sproinngs


#1

I’ve never panned for gold, but your enthusiasm may be catching!

G’day; You should try it Marrin: it’s easy, fun and the equipment
won’t mean a mortgage on your house. A proper gold-pan is best;
these have what they call a gold-saving rim - that is, a deep
groove near the edge in which the very fine particles of gold
will collect. If you’re lucky. These cost only a few dollars;
every tourist shop near our gold fields sell them, and motel
keepers lend them to anyone who asks - they’ll even tell you the
best places to go! But you can use a plastic washing-up basin
or even the hub caps of the older model cars (like mine) - I’ve
done it. Try a bit of practice first. 3/4 fill your
pan/basin/hubcap with a coarse mix of earth, aggregate, sand,
dirt - what have you. Mix with it some lead or copper filings or
hacksaw dust of heavy metals. You need a large tub of water
into which the vessel can be immersed. Fill the vessel with
water, and slosh it about vigorously, chucking out all the coarse
material, stones, rocks, boulders and dead cats. Your vessel
should be about half full by now. Fill with water again, and
repeat the process, but shake rattle and roll very vigorously, to
make the heavy stuff to sink under the lighter material. Repeat
the process until there’s only about half a cupful of material
left. Swirl this and tilt the pan - you should see the the bright
flecks of copper/brass/lead/gold or whatever happened to be with
the original material. Be a bit more careful now, and finally
wash the metal into a funnel in a little bottle of water. Use a
little round bottle - it will make your ‘gold’ look more than
there is. Mind you though, you might need to dress up a bit to
avoid the sand flies, mosquitoes, alligators, and so on taking
bits of you home for their children. But although

that’s about it, you’ll need to learn the most likely places to
go, and more sophisticated ways of getting that elusive metal -
that’s a whole bookful of But watch it: there is no
antidote for gold fever. If you catch it you’ll have it for life.
My old mate, Owen only stopped last year and he is 82. Go to any
little house on the West Coast of the South Island and just about
every old codger you meet will have a little jar or tin of nice
alluvial gold nuggets and dust tucked away. Cheers now, P.S;
you’ll need to visit your travel agent very soon to avoid the
rush.

    /\
   / /    John Burgess, 
  / /
 / //\    @John_Burgess2
/ / \ \

/ (___)
(_________)


#2

I’ve never panned for gold, but your enthusiasm may be catching!

G’day; You should try it Marrin: it’s easy, fun and the
equipment won’t mean a mortgage on your house. A proper gold-pan
is best; these have what they call a gold-saving rim - that is, a
deep groove near the edge in which the very fine particles of
gold will collect. If you’re lucky. These cost only a few
dollars; every tourist shop near our gold fields sell them, and
motel keepers lend them to anyone who asks - they’ll even tell
you the best places to go! But you can use a plastic washing-up
basin or even the hub caps of the older model cars (like mine) -
I’ve done it. Try a bit of practice first. 3/4 fill your
pan/basin/hubcap with a coarse mix of earth, aggregate, sand,
dirt - what have you. Mix with it some lead or copper filings or
hacksaw dust of heavy metals. You need a large tub of water
into which the vessel can be immersed. Fill the vessel with
water, and slosh it about vigorously, chucking out all the coarse
material, stones, rocks, boulders and dead cats. Your vessel
should be about half full by now. Fill with water again, and
repeat the process, but shake rattle and roll very vigorously, to
make the heavy stuff to sink under the lighter material. Repeat
the process until there’s only about half a cupful of material
left. Swirl this and tilt the pan - you should see the the bright
flecks of copper/brass/lead/gold or whatever happened to be with
the original material. Be a bit more careful now, and finally
wash the metal into a funnel in a little bottle of water. Use a
little round bottle - it will make your ‘gold’ look more than
there is. Mind you though, you might need to dress up a bit to
avoid the sand flies, mosquitoes, alligators, and so on taking
bits of you home for their children. But although

that’s about it, you’ll need to learn the most likely places to
go, and more sophisticated ways of getting that elusive metal -
that’s a whole bookful of But watch it: there is no
antidote for gold fever. If you catch it you’ll have it for life.
My old mate, Owen only stopped last year and he is 82. Go to any
little house on the West Coast of the South Island and just about
every old codger you meet will have a little jar or tin of nice
alluvial gold nuggets and dust tucked away. Cheers now,

P.S;
you’ll need to visit your travel agent very soon to avoid the
rush. –

        /\
       / /    John Burgess, 
      / /
     / //\    @John_Burgess2
    / / \ \
   / (___) \
  (_________)