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[Workshop] Duck, buck and bass engraving


#1

I was having a discussion with Tom Currie, a hand engraver here in
San Diego, about engraving realistic nature themes. Tom explained
that hand engraving of animals, like bucks, fish, flying ducks, or a
hunter with shotgun, involves a completely different training in hand
engraving. While most hand engravers learn to do a wide variety of
decorative effects on metal with their gravers, most will panic if
asked to engrave nature scenes. You must have a highly specialized
talent for this type of engraving work. While I have only once in 30
years been asked to have an engraved scene of flying ducks on a piece
of jewelry ( I declined ), I think finding a real expert that can
produce these types of scenes would be really hard to find. Does
anyone out there know of any “old school” engravers who still do the
"hunter with shotgun and flying ducks" scenes on the breech of a
shotgun? If so, I would imagine they are using an air-driven graver
now, not the hammer driven chisels they way they used to.

Tom Currie will be offering a one day workshop in basic hand
engraving/surface embellishment at Whaley Studios in San Diego on
July 18. We then plan to offer an ongoing weekly class after that
July workshop.

Jay Whaley


#2
I think finding a real expert that can produce these types of
scenes would be really hard to find. Does anyone out there know of
any "old school" engravers who still do the "hunter with shotgun
and flying ducks" scenes on the breech of a shotgun? If so, I would
imagine they are using an air-driven graver now, not the hammer
driven chisels they way they used to.

If you go to Steve Lindsey’s web site, and sign up (free, like
Orchid) for his engravers forums, you’ll find a wealth of info both
on techniques, and a whole bunch of people, including of course
Steve, who do fantastic engraving, including this style of work. Most
of it, I think, is “Bulino” engraving, where fine shades and
photorealistic style work is done with tiny dots, rather than
engraved lines. A bit like Mezzotint etching work in printmaking…

http://www.lindsayengraving.com

Even if you’re not looking for who does this, Steves site is well
worth a look. Bring a bib. You WILL be drooling a bit…

And yes, I am a satisfied owner of one of his handpieces. Now I just
wish I could come even remotely close to doing with it what he, and
some of the others on his forum, can achieve…

Peter


#3
Tom explained that hand engraving of animals, like bucks, fish,
flying ducks, or a hunter with shotgun, involves a completely
different training in hand engraving. While most hand engravers
learn to do a wide variety of decorative effects on metal with
their gravers, most will panic if asked to engrave nature scenes.

If anybody wants to learn how to produce realistic images with
gravers, the way to go, is to study technique of the woodcut. One
has to realize that one can be an expert in a technique, but still
could not do an image. The prerequisite is drawing skills with a pen,
and that can take many, many years to master.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#4
While most hand engravers learn to do a wide variety of decorative
effects on metal with their gravers, most will panic if asked to
engrave nature scenes. You must have a highly specialized talent for
this type of engraving work.

What you’re describing is ‘bulino’ engraving. It’s not uncommon among
firearms engravers. Those who engrave ‘bulino’ use gravers that are
fashioned very differently from most gravers.

There are engravers that use ‘hammer & chisel’ and those who use
pneumatic tools. Both produce work at the highest levels.

KPK


#5

Jay,

Sounds like you’re describing a type of engraving called bulino. If
you’re seeking someone who does this type of engraving on guns per
se, then fega.com is “the” gun engraver’s website & you could contact
Rex Pederson (the Prez) or probably anyone there for some help.

Steve Lindsay’s engravingforum.com & Sam Alfano’s igraver.com are
both forums where you can find a few extremely talented individuals
and galleries of their bulino work too.

Hope that gives you somewhere to start, CaroL


#6
"Bulino" engraving, where fine shades and photorealistic style work
is done with tiny dots, rather than engraved lines.

Jason Marchiafava is a very talented engraver and gold smith. The
style of Bulino he does uses both tiny dots and very fine lines as
needed for effect. His website for browsing is www.jfava.com.

Have a wonderful week,
Michelle


#7

Jay,

You might consider contacting the Firearms Engravers Guild of
America at http://www.fega.com/. Googling “firearms engraving
service” brings up other hits also.

Mike DeBurgh, GJG
Henderson, NV


#8

Way back in 1977 or 78, I took my first class in jewelry making at
what was then Oregon Technical Institute (Now Oregon Institute of
Technology) in Klamath Falls, OR. the course was metal engraving and
it was a 2 year course which went along with gun smithing that the
college offered at that time. The teacher was one of the leading
engravers in the country. She did fabulous animals and natural
scenes. She also made some very innovative jewelry. She talked me
into learning the art of “gold-silver smithing” instead of
engraving. She no doubt knew that I could never finish a two year
course since I had a “real” job and a large family at home. I fell in
love with metal work but have regretted that I didn’t go back to
complete the whole course. The college discontinued the gun-smithing
department after a couple of years so it wouldn’t have been possible
anyway.

Jan
www.designjewel.com


#9

Jay Whaley interviewed a local Engraver, Tom Currie on Blog Talk
Radio last Thursday. That program is archived and can be downloaded
via Today, blogtalkradio.com/whaleystudios, Jay asked me to help Tom
Currie join Orchid. So as soon as he gets a bit familiar, we should
see him here as well.

The first half of that Radio Broadcast, was with a jeweler, long
known to Jay, who also works with the properties of gems as they
relate to areas of the self.

I know this is very controversial, and I do not want to start any
sort of flame, it is out there to hear or not, as one so chooses.
The beliefs or disbelief’s are far older than all of us combined. Not
ever going to be resolved, so “que sera sera.”

This Thursday’s broadcast, hopefully, Jay will recover enough to
return to the Studio, may include two invited guests, and be about
alloys and tools. Stay tuned for more.

Last week we had a mini-raffle of Jay’s DVD’s and had some happy
winners. Not sure what this week will bring.

Terrie,
Holding down Whaley Studios for an ailing Jay.