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Work shop etiquette


#1

What are the suggestions for having a pleasant and productive
environment ? Heavy on the productive and profitable.

I am sharing space with two other people in a small studio. We have
projects in common and some which are independent. We have mixed
talents and skill levels There are two partners and one trainee, One
partner and the trainee are of similar ages. Two of us people have
disabilities of some sort. The trainee is being shown how to do piece
rate work as a subcontractor. Would it be good to call the trainee a
"trainee subcontractor for piece work"? What are the pitfalls and
advantages?

How did I get into this situation? Perhaps my gullible and sweet
nature! So far he only rule I have decided on is that" Only one of
us gets to be crazy at the same time".

ROBB


#2

I would suggest, NO GOSSIP, about anyone! Even if the gossip is not
about those working there (or about the one not present during
lunch), any sort of negativity toward others becomes a sore that
festers. You always remember that the other held someone in contempt
(and spoke about it in detail); it makes you wonder if they do the
same when about you when you are not present.

Also, there’s a lot of benefit to a regime of formal politeness in a
mixed environment like yours, though it may not be possible to
implement it anymore.

Aim for old-fashioned courtesy and keep all chat work-related.

HTH,
Kelley Dragon


#3
What are the suggestions for having a pleasant and productive
environment ? Heavy on the productive and profitable. 

Headphones for everyone.

Clear, upfront communications. Put it in writing.

Good luck.
Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com


#4
The trainee is being shown how to do piece rate work as a
subcontractor. Would it be good to call the trainee a "trainee
subcontractor for piece work"? What are the pitfalls and
advantages? 

It helps if someone is the boss and everyone else accepts that fact.
But if your situation is more of a partnership or co-op, those things
can be tricky. Trying to do business in a situation that is not
especially businesslike can go very wrong.

The piece-work arrangement can be especially dangerous if the trainee
is not hired as an employee. If people are not getting along in your
shop, you don’t want it to become complaints to the Labor Department
because what you originally agreed to as friends doesn’t meet code.
Resentful partners or employees can make your life pretty miserable.


#5

Would it be good to call the trainee a “trainee subcontractor for
piece work”?

Sounds like the definition of journeyman