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Wood and Silver


#1

I’m making a necklace consisting of 1 wooden link (about 1" by 1/2"
and 4 mm thick), 1 silver link(1"x1/2" and 1mm thick), etc. I need to
solder each silver element. I figured I can do this by using a heat
sink on the wood or immerging it in water. But what about pickling
afterwards? I suppose the wood will not react well with the Sparex (or
Vitrex as it is called here). Any suggestion? Thanks, Linda from sunny and dry (finally!)
Belgium


#2

I would not suggest you immerse any wood in any acid. It absorbs the
acid and begins to deteriorate over time. The plywood panel my pickle
pot is on is enough proof for anyone. It is slowly but surely
dissolving as the acid attacks the wood fiber. I would suggest a
cold joint like a rivet or screw for your silver links. . Frank Goss


#3

Dear Linda, are you not simply making the silver links separately, then
joining them to the wooden? You didn’t describe how you are attaching
the silver links to the wooden. Couldn’t the silver links and their
attachments to the wooden links be pre-assembled, pickled, polished,
etc then last of all attached to the wooden bits? This is the way most
jewellers would approach attaching metallic and organic elements. I
recently completed a hinged rosewood and gold collar using this basic
approach without problems. It requires a little pre-planning, but
that’s what one does. Kind regards Rex


#4

When soldering the silver, since your links are pretty large, just
use soldering arms (third hands) to isolate the wooden links from the
silver link. So you’ll have the 2 wooden links held by one arm,
another arm holding the silver link with the joint uppermost, and the
silver link is not touching the wooden ones at all. Solder the links
in assemblies of three (2 wooden ones, one silver), then solder these
assemblies together with more silver links.

To remove the smutz from the silver, either brass brush the silver or
use a little fine pumice powder. Do they sell Bon Ami scouring powder
there? This is pumice powder with a little soap, but no chlorine.
Cheap, works great.


#5

Savineau, I would use a mechanical connection rather than
solder.Design the link to be riveted rather than solder.There are low
temp solders but they will be hard to work with when using wood.I
guess it depends on what type of wood you are going to use and the
size of the links. Best J Morley Coyote Ridge Studio


#6

If it’s feasible, how about attacking the problem in reverse? Saw
the wooden links apart. Then attach the finished silver links and glue
the wooden links together carefully ,sanding and polishing as needed
to render the seam invisible.

Dee


#7
     I'm making a necklace consisting of 1 wooden link (about 1" by
1/2" and 4 mm thick), 1 silver link(1"x1/2" and 1mm thick), etc. I
need to solder each silver element. I figured I can do this by using
a heat sink on the wood or immerging it in water. But what about
pickling afterwards? 

Why not clean the silver after the soldering with dry baking soda & a
soft toothbrush? If that does not remove all of the oxidation, then
try a scrubdown with 0000 steel wool. Hope this helps.

Helene


#8

if your worried about oxidation …use magic flux…it leaves
the metal bright…ringman