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Window exhaust fan


#1

Greetings Orchidians:

Happy New Year to all!

I’m setting up my bench in the apartment, guided by the many
wonderful tips I received, and have a another question,
regarding exhaust. I was wondering if I could use one of those
’kitchen window exhaust fans’ - the kind with 1 large fan, or 2
smaller side-by-side fans (which either draws air out or pulls
it in, depending on how they’re directed).

In anyone’s experience, are these fans strong enough for this
purpose? The window fans would sit at bench level, approximately
1 foot away. One window would sit open, and the other window
would hold the fan. In anyone’s opinion, would this be adequate
ventilation?

Thanks to all for your advice.

Mona


#2

Mona-

I used a small window exhaust for a long time but I found that I
really preferred a vent tube that comes right down to within a
few inches of my soldering station. It’s a flexible metal pipe
that hooks to the fan so I can adjust it according to the size of
my work.

Deb


#3

Mona,

I don’t know where you’re geographically located, but here in
New England an open window in mid-winter is not viable, nor would
it be anywhere, I’d imagine, in rainy or dusty climes.

Personally, I have a kitchen range exhaust hood set up over my
soldering table and find it extremely effective. The hood
connects to sheet metal duct, run up through the ceiling, vented
to the outdoors. The fan has two speeds and is powerful enough to
recirculate the entire volume of air in my studio approximately
every 8 minutes. Any fumes from soldering, pickling, etc. get
sucked up immediately. The hood cost me about 40 bucks at Home
Depot and the duct pipe was another 15. A cheap but effective
ventilation system.


#4

ANYTHING is better than nothing. My basement window is about 3
foot above my bench and plan on devising a “hood” to add extra
ventelation out that window.


#5

Royal Palm:

That would be better than nothing but,take notice.Any exast system is
going to remove conditioned air from your work space.The more you
remove the more your air conditioning system must cool or heat.If you
use a strong fan in your window and open a window in another room,you
will be moving alot of air out of your apartment.If you don’t open
another window or door in the structure you will basically create a
low pressure in your workroom and air will fight its way in where ever
it can,even right back along side your fan.

A kitchen exaust hood mounted over your bench is a good idea,but
remember to slightly open a window in another room and keep an open
path for the air to travel into your workroom or your ventilator will
do little more than make noise.

Michael Mathews Victoria,Texas USA


#6
 I don't know where you're geographically located, but here in
New England an open window in mid-winter is not viable, nor
would it be anywhere, I'd imagine, in rainy or dusty climes.

It’s cold where I live, (in the winter) and hot during the
summer, but my basement seems to stay at a constant temp.,and
that’s one of the reasons I set up my studio there.

    Personally, I have a kitchen range exhaust hood set up
over my soldering table and find it extremely effective. The
hood connects to sheet metal duct, run up through the ceiling,
vented to the outdoors. The fan has two speeds and is powerful
enough to recirculate the entire volume of air in my studio
approximately every 8 minutes. Any fumes from soldering,
pickling, etc. get sucked up immediately. The hood cost me
about 40 bucks at Home Depot and the duct pipe was another 15.
A cheap but effective ventilation system. 

Anyway, I was wondering . . .how noisy is this set-up. (I’ve
asked before, but I don’t recall receiving an answer!) I’m
wondering if I would be better off having a sheet metal hood
made, with the motor (fan) part outdoors, so I could hear the
"books on tape" that I’m usually listening to . . . Any
thoughts or suggestions?


#7

Oh! right. No one has mentioned ear protection yet, have they?
I developed tinnitus (rinning in the ears) after an auto accident
and did sound level checks while making the ergonomic changes in
the studio to accommodate the neck. You would be unpleasantly
surprised to discover exactly how noisy our studios are.

My exhaust fan is the worst (heavy duty 3-speed kitchen range)
but even the flex-shaft was high. Add the radio/tape (at higher
than usual volume so it can be heard above the rest of the din)
and the total might well be over safety levels.

I have a pair of ear plugs on a cord attached to my work apron
– easy to pop um in when needed.

Colleen


#8

For those who would Like a quick and Dirty method of testing
there shop ventilation,

  1. turn on your vent fans

  2. spray cheep obnoxious floral room air fresher liberally in
    shop

  3. leave shop and close door

  4. reenter about 10 min later if room still has a strong smell
    of air fresher, you need better ventilation.

The standard for room ventilation is 6 air changes per hr.
Every 10 min. While you were out the air should have been
changed, hence no air fresher.

Wayne


#9

Anyway, I was wondering . . .how noisy is this set-up. (I’ve
asked before, but I don’t recall receiving an answer!) I’m
wondering if I would be better off having a sheet metal hood
made, with the motor (fan) part outdoors, so I could hear the
"books on tape" that I’m usually listening to . . . Any
thoughts or suggestions?

How noisy? Well, if you have, or have experience with, a typical
range hood in a kitchen you’ve got a pretty good idea. The
decibeI level depends on what speed you set the fan at. I use
acetelyne for soldering, and the low speed (not noisy at all)
works just fine for pulling away the sooty fumes – I have white
walls and no dark spots. The high speed is definately louder, but
I use it rarely, and only for a few minutes at a time.
Installing the system as I set it up was a snap. Good luck!


#10

My exhaust fan is loud which is why I only turn it on when I
solder. Putting the motor on the outside sounds like and idea I
may look into myself. Thanks- Deb


#11
Anyway, I was wondering . . .how noisy is this set-up.  (I've
asked before, but I don't recall receiving an answer!)  I'm
wondering if I would be better off having a  sheet metal hood
made, with the motor (fan) part outdoors, so I could hear the
"books on tape" that I'm usually listening to  . . .  Any
thoughts or suggestions? 

There is a product that does just this … several, in fact. I
can’t remember the brand, but there is a venting system similar
to the Jenn Air stoves, but where the fan is remoted to the end
of the duct work, and sucks air through the stove or hood,
rather than pushing it out. Jenn Air, or one of their
contractors, supplied something similar for a TV studio where I
once worked.

I also saw a bathroom vent system on TV the other day that uses
a fan suspended from the rafters of the attic and a flexible
hose to the vent in the loo, to minimize noise. This is the
one I vote for, and will likely use sometime in the future.

Marrin Fleet
@Marrin_and_Mary_Dell
Memphis, TN


#12

I had a friend who has a heating and cooling business install a
sheet metal hood over my kilns and plating areas. The used a
large fan that is shaped like a jet engine, it makes some noise
but not as much as one of those kitchen hood jobs. It can be
installed anywhere, attic etc. I insalled a dimmer switch on it
so I can run it on low to high. It really moves the air.

I think its worth getting a pro in to look at your shop and
evaluate you ventilation needs even if your shop is in your home,
maybe especially if its at home.

Mark P.


#13

Hi Gang,

If you’re going to ‘homebrew’ your soldering ventilator & are
concerned about noise level you might try using ‘muffin fans’.
They’re the fans use= d for cooling a lot of computers. I’ve
seen them in sizes from about 2"x 2" to 16" x 16". I’d expect
you’d need at least an 8" x 8" for an adequate vent fan. Most
electronics parts stores have them or can order them.

Dave


#14

the book available thru rio, borel and frei and am sure others
to read is: vent and ventilation. one of the options it talks
about is using a squirrel cage fan at the end (near the exterior
wall and exhaust) of the duct run, recessed slightly. since the
end of the duct run will be be most likely further from you, the
motor won’t be so loud. one can position the motor outside if
one wants.

best regards,

geo fox


#15

Small 110 volt high-volume fans can also be salvaged from old
photocopiers… you often only have to attach a cord and plug it
in! I have two in my studio now!

Dave

Dave Sebaste
Sebaste Studio
Charlotte, NC (USA)
dave@sebaste.com
http://www.sebaste.com


#16
  Small 110 volt high-volume fans can also be salvaged from
old     photocopiers... you often only have to attach a cord
and plug it   in!  I have two in my studio now! 

Dave, are these fans “vented” to the outdoors? If not, then I
may not need to get a “hood” of anysort to vent out over my
soldering area. I have a small fan (very quiet) blowing the
entire time I’m in the workshop. My hot water tank (also in the
basement) has a vented hood which exhausts to the outdoors as
does my furnace.


#17

There has been a lot of talk about exhaust fans for shopsand the
diff. gases that we use.As I’ve mentioned before ,my background
includes doing time as a plumbing contractor,I’ve heard a lot of
horror stories and some of the things I’ve read on this list
scare the hell out of me.If you have other gas burning
appliances and you are adding exhaust vents you need to be
careful about creating a negative pressure in the building and
sucking flue gases back in, this is very dangerous. I don’t know
if you were thinking of running your exhaust fan into the flue
for your water heater or furnace, but if you were, don’t, under
any circumstance do that.I don’t know if you are a propane user
or notbut if you are be very careful about leaks on the same
level as your water heater and furnace,if propane builds up to
your pilot light, well, you would’nt have to worry about exhaust
anymore.Of course ,if you have a sealed combustion appliance
with forced draft ,then this does’nt apply. I’d be glad to help
anyone if I can, just e-mail me direct,Mike


#18
    "I've heard a lot of horror stories and some of the things
I've read on this list scare the hell out of me.If you have other
gas burning appliances and you are adding exhaust vents you need
to be careful about creating a negative pressure in the building
and sucking flue gases back in, this is very dangerous. "

I have to say that I agree with Mike. People with furnaces and
other gas appliances must provide a source of makeup air into their
homes if they are installing window exhaust fans. If you suck more
air out of your home than you are putting in, you create a negative
pressure. This negative pressure causes exhaust fumes from your gas
appliances to be sucked down the chimney and back into your home.
About 300 people die this way each year in Canada.

A carbon monoxide detector would help to detect exhaust fumes
coming into your home. They cost about $30 -$50. But a detector is
not a substitute for an adequate supply of fresh make up air.

Milt Fischbein