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Why jewelers do not use Bucky C


#1

Bucky C is also rare and expensive. Can anyone then explain why the
jewelry mantra (beauty/rarity/durability) does not apply? IOW why
don’t we see jewellers working Bucky C into charms for bracelets,
necklaces, etc? Is there a 4th word we need in the mantra?

M


#2

What is “Bucky C”. I have never heard of it.

Thanks K


#3
Bucky C is also rare and expensive. Can anyone then explain why
the jewelry mantra (beauty/rarity/durability) does not apply? 

For good or bad, “recognition” is also big part of it, and it maybe
should be your 4th word. I’ve got some drop-dead gorgeous red spinels
that are cleaner, better-colored, and in my opinion, a hell of a lot
nicer than most of the way-more-expensive rubies I’ve gotten. But
when people say, “OMG!!! Are those real rubies in that piecee!!!
They’re GORGEOUS!!!” and I tell them they’re spinels, it’s like I
just told them they’re glass. I have to go into this huge explanation
about what a spinel is before they’re interested again. And that’s if
I can convince them I’m not selling them a fake stone. And the only
reason why I can afford these beautiful, rare, and durable spinels is
that they don’t have the name recognition of rubies. Spinel is close
to opal among my favorites, but most people could care less. Yeah,
educated people know and care, but most potential clients aren’t
educated. People aren’t using “Bucky C” for jewelry because not
enough people know what it is, and no market has “sold” it to the
public yet. I have to admit that I even needed to google it before I
wrote this (not that I totally understand it even now), but I knew
what my answer to you was going to be before I googled it. The truth
is, name recognition makes a gem valuable or not to the larger buying
public.


#4
People aren't using "Bucky C" for jewelry because not enough people
know what it is, and no market has "sold" it to the public yet. I
have to admit that I even needed to google it before I wrote this 

Can you post the link? All I found was that it’s a programming
language.

Paf Dvorak


#5
And the only reason why I can afford these beautiful, rare, and
durable spinels is that they don't have the name recognition of
rubies. Spinel is close to opal among my favorites, but most
people could care less. Yeah, educated people know and care, but
most potential clients aren't educated. 

I do not believe that the people are not educated, they are, and that
education is from the traditional jewelry “establishment”, ruby,
sapphire, emerald, diamond, garnet, amethyst, blue topaz, sometimes
opal, a few others are what is marketed by the majority of
traditional jewelry stores.

I have shown people beautiful natural gems, and say that they don’t
look real, and I tell them that when people see imitation gems, they
look like like the best quality natural gems and then when they see
the natural gem they think it not real because the majority of the
gems Americans see in mall stores are low quality crap.

I too have natural spinel. My experience is that people are more
excepting of the use of the less common gems when the design is the
primary focus and the gems are both the enhancement of the design
and they make the piece “pop”. Another point to make is that the
color red is not found in many natural gems, and point out that a
natural ruby of that color would be $$$$$ and this gem is natural,
comparable in color to a fine ruby, and it is $$ and quite
affordable. Hopefully your spinels are not pinkish red, purplely red,
but a true fine ruby red.

Richard Hart G. G.
Denver, Co.


#6

Hi Guys,

“Bucky C” as in Buckminsterfullerene? (As in Carbon nanotubes and
nanoparticles?)

Errr. it’s black. Looks like charcoal powder. (Pretty much is
charcoal powder.)

Why would you use it for jewelry?

Just curious to see if I’ve mis-understood something.

Regards,
Brian


#7
Bucky C is also rare and expensive. Can anyone then explain why the
jewelry mantra (beauty/rarity/durability) does not apply? For good
or bad, "recognition" is also big part of it, and it maybe should
be your 4th word. 

That is excellent. I was struggling with something like “within the
fashion norms of a given era”. Too long - RECOGNITION does it. Thanks
for the lesson on spinel. We have had other postings on the waxing
and waning of fashion statements in baubles, bangles and bright shiny
beads. The royalty of Greco-Roman empire days would not have been
impressed by being given a chunk of rough diamond - off to the salt
mines might have been the reaction.

Google the wiki titled fullerene for an essay on Bucky C (popular
term, not science term). You can see crystals and a pretty mauve
solution. It even occurs in nature which surprised me (as did
learning that plutonium also occurs in nature though I might be
reluctant to wear a PU ring). Fullerene can be used in a fashion
statement and the final product can be as high on the scale of
beauty, rarity and durability as you want.

Will it be recognized any more than perfect one carat diamonds
mounted in moose droppings? That depends on the artistry of the
jewelry smiths and the artistry of the word smiths like those at De
Beers (Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend; Diamonds are Forever).


#8
I do not believe that the people are not educated, they are, and
that education is from the traditional jewelry "establishment".... 

You are right about that. My work is all one-off and very different,
so most people who are truly interested in purchasing my jewelry are
usually interested enough to ask about the whole story of the piece
" including about the gems. So they’ll be interested when I tell
them about spinels. The last spinel I used was surrounded by an
opal, and a gold bird and flower.


#9

Why jewelers do not use Bucky C What is Bucky C, where to you get
it, andhow do you use it? Is it a faceted stone? Is it something you
pour in a mold? Sally Parker


#10
"Bucky C" as in Buckminsterfullerene? (As in Carbon nanotubes and
nanoparticles?) 

That was my thought too. I’ve not got a clue as to what Bucky C is
other than Buckminsterfullerene. Looking forward to finding out
though.

Helen
UK


#11
Why would you use it for jewelry? Just curious to see if I've
mis-understood something. 

No, you havent misunderstood.

Nick Royall