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What steel to use for chasing tools


#1

Im looking into making my own chasing tools. So what type of steel
do i ask for when i go to a hardware store or the like?


#2
    Im looking into making my own chasing tools. So what type of
steel do i ask for when i go to a hardware store or the like? 

For the basic hammer, that will not be HT, I would use 1018, try
Speedy Metals 1-866-616-1018, maybe a 1084 metal and if you wanted
to make a really hard hammer via HT, use 1095.

Jerry


#3
    Im looking into making my own chasing tools. So what type of
steel do i ask for when i go to a hardware store or the like? 

Try http://www1.mscdirect.com

I suggest W1 water hardening tool steel, square stock, cold rolled,
also called square drill rod. You can use round drill rod, but then
you have to make flat sides on it or square it off to make a useable
tool. Do not use key stock.

see http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nenam/chasing_forming_tool.htm

and http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nenam/chasing.htm

best
Charles


#4
    Im looking into making my own chasing tools. So what type of
steel do i ask for when i go to a hardware store or the like? 

In a hardware store, they might have something called “drill rod”,
which is an oil hardening carbon steel, in most cases. Sometimes it’s
called “piano wire” although it’s much thicker than anything we’d
usually refer to as wire. Probably better to look up a supplier of
tool steels. There’s a product called “flutagon” (not sure of the
spelling) which is an air hardening steel which comes in rods that
have slight flutes the length of the rod. Perfect for chasing tools.
I believe it’s air hardening, which would make tempering easy.
Otherwise, get an air or oil hardening steel designed for punches.
Unless you’re planning to forge it the entire length of the tool,
you should get a square rod of one that’s rectangular in cross
section. Round rod such as piano wire or drill rod needs to be
shaped so that the tool doesn’t turn in the hand when you’re using
it. A good supplier should now an appropriate steel for a stated
application.

David L. Huffman


#5
  "Im looking into making my own chasing tools. So what type of
steel do i ask for when i go to a hardware store or the like?" 

Ask for drill rod.

JinK


#6

Chasing tools were made with the same steel as the gravers.

Years ago Gamzon use to carry blanks that came from the graver
manufacturer Lembeck.

A thousand of these were dumped into the garbage by an ignorant
Auctioneer. I witnessed that & it is like salt on the wounds.
Sometimes we learn things a little too late.

I wonder if one can try with small chisels.

Kenneth Singh
karat46@aol.com


#7

http://store.tremontnail.com/cgi-bin/tremontnail/items?mv_arg=5

Try these nails for your chasing tools, they are inexpensive and
they can be annealed and hardened. We are using them because tagane
tools are hard to come by in the US. They work wonderfully.

James McMurray
@James_McMurray
metals program digital design/build center
121 art building
school of art,
university of washington
seattle, wa 98195
206.685.3674


#8

Ask for “tool steel” or “drill rod”. Can be gotten round or square
in various sizes. “Mild steel” will not do at all.

Or adapt other tools to your purpose, i.e. punches, files, chisels.

See the book “The Making of Tools” by Alex Weygers for practical
info on annealing, forming, and tempering tool steel appropriately
for your intended use.

Marty in Victoria


#9

Hi Gang,

       Im looking into making my own chasing tools. So what type
of steel do i ask for when i go to a hardware store or the like? 

If you’re into using ‘other objects’ to make your chasing tools
here’s some items that’ll work. Using them will require you to
anneal then prior to shaping the points & rehardening after they’re
made. Concrete or masonry nails, the rod part of engine valves, old
or new punches & chisels, files, rebar, railroad spikes.

Dave.


#10

What you are looking for is tool steel. It comes in various sizes. I
use material that is oil quenched for my punches. There are other
categories like water quenched and air quenched. Don’t use them. I’m
sure someone will jump on here and give all the technical details.
How 'bout it, guys? Help me out!

Robin C. McGee
Rcmcgee47@comcast.net