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What is your opinion on the best Jewelers Saw


#1

I have been silversmithing for a few years now and I have the basic german 4" saw frame, I know that the quality of saw blades can make a big difference, but I was wondering if any of the more expensive saw frames really make a difference. There is the Knew concept one and Otto Frei has a really pretty one called GreenLion Studios saw frame. Just looking for input on whether it is worth adding one of these to my Christmas wish list. Thanks in advance for your input.
Bernadette Johnson


#2

I like my Knew concept saw for making deeper cuts without having to back the saw blade out, however, I must admit that I still use an old basic saw 99% of the time. Maybe because I am so used to it, I can follow a line better (more accurate cuts) and I prefer the way it feels.


#3

I use the Knew Concept saw frames now and I find them a joy to use, my favourite one is this one, which was one of Lee’s first titanium models.


#4

I do have quite a collection of saw frames now, as I have tried and used many types as I have been piercing for over 50 years now.


#5

I feel like I am always wrestling with my german version to get the tension as tight as I want it. It looks like that might be easier with the Knew concepts one, is that the case?


#6

That is absolutely amazing!


#7

I have been using a simple German saw for about 40 years. I do a great deal of sawing and often use 8/0’s. I find sawing a joy and usually wear out sawblades as opposed to breaking them. I’ve never had any trouble putting the blades in and never had any problems with the tension. Thus I’m always amazed at all the threads about the Knew Concepts saw and can’t help but wonder about the many tools now being made to ‘help’ metalsmiths perform tasks that were always in the standard repertoire of all professional metalsmiths. Things like jigs to help you file a 90 degree angle. Shouldn’t you be able to do that with your eye and hands? I’m a tool freak, but I’m beginning to realize that I’m an old-tool freak… So many of the tools devised nowadays seem to be in place of acquiring skills.

So the answer to your question Bernadette is that you should do perfectly well with your present saw frame, good saw blades (I usually use Rio’s Gold), sitting straight with both feet flat on the floor, shoulders down, a relaxed wrist, and deep breathing…:-)…

Janet in Jerusalem


#8

I have the normal 4" German saw that most jewelers have, but bought 2 Knew Concept saws a few years ago. As a beginner I appreciate the ease of threading the saw blades and adjusting the tension on the Knew saw frames. The larger Knew saw frame allows me to make deeper cuts than 4" which has come in handy several times, but the heavier frame weight makes this on a bit more difficult to saw with.

But having said this, the Knew Concepts saw frames can’t replace experience or skill in piercing and sawing. They do make blade placement and tension easier for me.


#9

I like having different saws; when one annoys me I have different choices immediately available.

There are things I like and dislike about each of the saw frames you mention, but my issues with saw frames are probably my own fault.

Mostly I use the Knew Concepts titanium saw. I prefer the way it feels. I love how the blade can be turned and it has a unique tension lever which might please you. The tension lever seems to give me trouble sometimes, but that’s user error for sure.

Sometimes when sawing with the Green Lion, it seems like I bump into the curved frame, probably because I’m used to the angled frames.

The german saw frame allows me to frugally reuse the longer end of a broken blade because it will adjust lengthwise.


#10

There are a lot of good things about the Knew Concept saw, but I’m sorry to say that I seldom use it. I have one of the first models with the tightening spring , and it has a nasty habit of nipping off the very end of the blade when I’m tightening it. These blades can be used in regular saws, of course, because I can shorten their blade holder a bit, but it’s annoying.

Janet Kofoed


#11

There is a simple way to adjust the saw for different blade thicknesses,
which will solve that problem. Check the Knew Concepts website for that
and you will stop nipping off the ends of blades.

I had an old “German” saw frame that was o.k., bought another one with a
larger throat size, it still said “German” on it, looked exactly the
same. It was a piece of rubbish with so much extra space in the various
spots to tighten things that I wonder if it was a non-German
counterfeit, or if that garbage is what they are passing off these days.

I use my Knew Concepts saw frame for all work now, down to 10/0 blades,
which do not break in that frame unless I get careless. Best saw frame I
know of for gently tightening 8/0 and 10/0 blades. My daughter uses a
"German" saw frame, borrowed my Knew Concepts, and was amazed by it.
She is getting one for Christmas. (Don’t tell.)

While my daughter was borrowing my frame I had to use hers, and if you
are old enough you will know the difference between power steering and
non-power steering. Knew Concepts is like a feather, heavy “German” saw
frames are like a truck without power steering. My two cents.

Neil A.


#12

I also, love my Knew Concepts saw, had to sand off the finish on the
handle, much prefer the feel of wood! Only wish is that they offered
several colors of frames, I leave different blades in frames. So you can
grab the blade you want for a job.

Mark C

“Everyone is entitled to their own opinions; but everyone is not entitled to their own facts.”

–Daniel Patrick Moynihan


#13

I love my Knew Concepts saw. It is the original model. I am also partial to a vintage saw that is lovely to look at and lighter than modern “German” saw frames. Karen


#14

Interesting, I absolutely hated the new concepts saw frame. The saw blade wandered around like a drunk. Or like I was drunk.


#15

Years ago I bought one of the original Knew concept saws like yours with the screw top and the very deep throat, and I love it. You just have to get used to the plucking sound of the blade once it’s tight enough. I love that I NEVER break blades. There’s zero torque in the frame so my blades last very very long. I actually don’t even remove the blade when I’m done sawing. I just loosen the knob two turns so the tension is released and sit it down like that. When I need to saw again, two twists [and a pluck to check, and some bur-life] and I’m back in business.
I only change the blade if I’m sawing a radically different thickness metal.
Carol Minnich


#16

If you want different color frames, why not paint them with jazzy color
nail polish? Or wrap the frame with a piece of colored electrical tape?


#17

Let me say up front that sawing is not my strong suit. That being said, I have tried a number of saw frames. I tried an earlier version (2010) of the Knew Concepts saw frame and was not a fan. It was a frustrating experience. I now use a Green Lion which I like a lot. Just my two cents.
Andy

Please excuse any typos-- curse my clumsy digits…


#18

There has been a lot of different opinions about saw frames, which is interesting. Which frame you use really depends on what type of piercing you do. If you only pierce small jewellery parts now and then, the small steel frames like the Greenlion will probably suit you OK. But if like me you sometimes get piercing jobs of a larger size then you will appreciate the quality of using the Knew Concept frames. Some jobs I pierce can take me hundreds of hours to complete, like this pair of gold plique a-jour enamelled table lamps.


#19

@jamesmiller046

I’m in awe. And you made two!

I see those intricately pierced panels are mechanically held together at first, but I don’t see the connections in the final photo, so is the enamel holding the panels together?

What do you use as a curved backing for the plique a-jour?


#20

I have actually made three pairs of these shades.
All of the panels were fixed to the central pierced circular frame with screw fittings.
Platinum foil was used as a backing for the plique a-jour.

The top flower petals were hammered from sheet.