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Welcome - Lisa Hawthorne


#1

ALL RIGHT! an enamelist. hooray… welcome Lisa

Okay, let’s get straight to the point, time to put you to
work… :slight_smile:

I’m working on a commission to do an ocean wave motif necklace
in 18k, with transparent enamels over engraved wave patterns.
This is a new style for me, having always done opaque work in the
past. The necklace will have links approximately 2" long by 1/2"
at the thickest (like a smile), and crescent shaped, with the
centerpiece considerably larger and more complex (crashing wave).
The questions are: where is a good source for transparent enamel
glass? They should be bright, vibrant, and very clean (this
already rules out american enamels…) Do you have any sources in
France or Italy? Secondly, about counter enameling on pieces with
varying internal thickness. Do you think I might be able to get
away with NO enameling on the reverse side?

sorry to put you to work so quickly…

Thanks!

   Jeffrey Everett, jewelry craftsman

Handmade 18K, 22K, and platinum gemstone jewelry.
Diamond setting, rubber/metal molds, casting, lapidary
Die and mold engraving, plastic patterns for casting.
Jewelry design, cad/cam, milling, scroll, filigree, & more.
P O Box 2057 Fairfield IA 52556 515-469-6250


#2

Hi Lisa,

It is great to hear of another enamelist out there! I primarily
work in cloissone, how about you?

Nikki


#3

Lisa,

I am also an enamelist, fine silver, gold, cloisonn. Have you
ever enamelled beads? I am interested in doing so and would
appreciate any you might have. I have scoured my books
to no avail and in the process of doing some experimentation.

Thanks,
Linda
Raining in Willits, Northern Ca., USA


#4

Lisa,

I am also an enamelist, fine silver, gold, cloisonn. Have you
ever enamelled beads? I am interested in doing so and would
appreciate any you might have. I have scoured my books
to no avail and in the process of doing some experimentation.

Thanks,
Linda
Raining in Willits, Northern Ca., USA


#5

Hi, are you looking to make glass beads “lampworking” or are you
wanting to enamel on a metal base like copper or silver. I have
done both and will be glad to answer any questions you have…Karen

@karenworks1


#6
   Hi, are you looking to make glass beads "lampworking" or are
you wanting to enamel on a metal base like copper or silver.  I
have done both and will be glad to answer any questions you have 

No, I have already done the enameling on copper, silver and lots
of gold, nor am I interested in lampworking. But thanks, just
working again in metal on this project. Pat


#7

Hi Karen: I’m also a reader of posts on Orchid and would be
interested to know how you made metal beads to enamel. Did you
have to use “hard” solder, and were they silver or copper base?
Thanks for any info you care to share.

Phyllis Richardson.


#8

Thank you for responding to my reply. I would like to enamel on
fine silver. I would like to try my hand at cloisonnE9 enameling
the bead. Here are my questions:

  1. What is a good aperture to keep the enamel smooth around the
    bead and hold it in the kiln while firing.

  2. I wet pack and when the enamel dries, of course, it would fall
    of the round surface. What do you suggest as a substitute to
    water to keep the dry enamel on the bead.

  3. I have tried using solder when joining the two halves of the
    bead together, but this does not react well with the
    enamel…dark spots, etc.

  4. I have also tried fusing but my fusing needs practice. Any
    other suggestions you can give me about this process would be very

much appreciated.
Linda Crawford
Willits, CA


#9

Hi, Yes, I would be interested in how to make enamel on copper
beads. Any you could pass on would be appreciated.
Thanks, Cat Dancing


#10

Phyllis, you may not know, but there are three of us Karens out
there. Since I don’t know which Karen you meant this note to, I’ll
take a stab at it anyway.

For enameling silver beads, I dap out two fine silver halvesand
fuse the two together. I have the “glue” recipe which is basically
Batterns flux, Hide Glue (as in rabbit skin hide) and water. If
you need to use solder, use IT which is very, very hard solder.

Hope this helps.

Karen Christians
Fly Fish Design
282 Lexington St.
Woburn, MA 01801

@metalart

Current Artwork:


#11

This is pretty much the advice one of the other Karen’s (me in
particular) would have given. Adding that in order to remove the
copper from the IT solder and make for better enameling I would
also do several cycles of heat, rinse & pickle until the IT solder
had become white looking just like the fine silver bead. This gets
rid of the “darkness” that can show through transparent enamels
with oxidation problems.

Karenworks@mediaone.net


#12
   Adding that in order to remove the copper from the IT solder
and make for better enameling I would also do several cycles of
heat, rinse & pickle until the IT solder had become white looking
just like the fine silver bead.

Thanks Karen. You are right of course. The heat and pickle cycle
is an important one, especially since you can get some very yellowy
solders from dubious sources.

Signed Karen…no not that Karen, the other Karen

Tulips in my garden and two lips to kiss.
Karen Christians
Fly Fish Design
282 Lexington St.
Woburn, MA 01801

@metalart

Current Artwork: