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Waxes


#1

hi, folks- those of you that create waxes through the build-up
method, (as opposed to carving), what brand of waxes do you favor
for this? Several experienced jewelers have told me they prefer
the build-up method, and I’m interested in trying it. would like
to know what to buy. Happy Easter- Anne Stickney


#2

I like a hard red wax that Bourget Bros. in Santa Monica, CA
used to call “Sierra Red.” I don’t know if they still have it.
I could actually draw tiny letters with it on a base of sheet
wax, such as the soft green stuff. Good luck! Ruth


#3

I like a hard red wax that Bourget Bros. in Santa Monica, CA
used to call “Sierra Red.” I don’t know if they still have it.
I could actually draw tiny letters with it on a base of sheet
wax, such as the soft green stuff.

Ruth,

Sounds like a very good wax… but how were u drawing the letters??? with
what … sort of device??.. interested in doing this kind of detail…

thanks Jim


#4

To draw letters from the red wax called “Sierra Red”-- I used a pointed
dental probe, heated over an alcohol lamp, to pick up a glob of wax. I let
it cool a bit, then used it to “write” on a piece of sheet wax, or any
other kind of wax. If I want to do the whole letter at one time, I use a
larger,pointed, but flat tool, and have it oriented so the wax drips down
the side edge. All of this takes some practice, until you learn how long
to let the wax cool, how much to pick up, etc. I have tried this with an
electric wax tool, and I can’t get it to work for this, as the wax can’t
cool sufficiently, not to run into a blob. It also helps to carve the
letters or designs into the base wax first, but not deeply at all, forming
a track of sorts, so the wax can have a guide to follow. If the base is at
all translucent, you can tape the lettering or designs underneath it, so
you can see through. This method for drawing designs in wax is lots of
fun for me, and can be very fluid and graceful.

Ruth


#5

Hi,

Most of this ‘fancy’ waxing technique is attributable to three
things:

1.) The proper wax
2.) The proper tools
3.) Practice in the use of both.

Alcohol lamps can and do put carbon an foreign matter into your
wax-up which will become porosity in your final casting. A
butane bunsen burner or a some such device is well worth the
expense. I am a Dental Technician with thirty years experience
that has made between 30,000-40,000 centrifugal casts producing
about 90,000 crown and bridge units(teeth) that I have waxed in
addition to all the jewelry I have waxed in the 27 years I have
done that work. I guess I have tried most of the waxes on the
market and have found that waxes containing carnauba are the
best for detail work. J.M.Ney the same people that make your
burnout furnaces and ultrasonics has a dental division that
sells a wax from a German fellow in Washington or Oregon that is
stupendous! Ney is in New Haven Ct. but most dental supply
houses carry this wax. I don’t have the info with me, but
E-mail me and I’ll send you the phone #'s and addresses of
suppliers. The detail work you can do with this wax due to its
flow ability and smooth carving properties is nothing short of
phenomenal.

                                  Skip Meister
                                NRA Endowment and
                                   Instructor
                                @Skip_Meister
                                04/24/9702:36:11