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Watch case making-forming

i need on a reliable, repeatable method of forming pair-
case and consular pocket watch cases. this style was used prior to
about 1800. the shape is basically like a cooking wok… a shallow
pan form. ive looked i to spinning and the bonny doon system from
rio grand… and im not thrilled with either. traditionally they
were doe with a large set of forming punches and matching dies. and
when a case maker was in business for 150 years they accumulated
quite a collection… however i dont have that luxury to draw from.

has anyone made a similar from? can i get some made?also does anyone
do small lost wax quantity casting? i can send pix of course . thanx
JRLord

send me pictures of the item and I will make my recommendation.

Robert

John,

First you should get a copy of “Four Generations of Watchcase
Making: a profile of Martin Matthews” you can get it from the film
maker at http://www.bdvideos.co.uk/horology.html this will show you
exactly how the cases were made. A Bonny Doon press and a set of hard
dies and a lathe for spinning and trimming will allow you to make
them. Casting will be difficult at best due to the thin section of
the watch case this really is a die form and turned type of project.

HTH
Jim

Jim Binnion

James Binnion Metal Arts
Phone (360) 756-6550
Toll Free (877) 408 7287
Fax (360) 756-2160


@James_Binnion
Member of the Better Business Bureau

I need on a reliable, repeatable method of forming
pair- case and consular pocket watch cases.

John,

I’ve been trying to find a good case maker for a few years, without
luck. But there’s a truly, honestly fascinating video showing the
complete process from start to finish, using no electrical tools.
Amazing craft! You might be able to figure out with this video.

  FOUR GENERATIONS OF WATCHCASE MAKING: A PROFILE OF MARTIN
  MATTHEWS, Professionally produced in the UK by Barbara  Darby
  (73) Demonstrates the steps in the construction a traditional
  watch case, including the operation of a Bow Lathe (c1750),
  Boxwood chucking of precious metals, Holtzapfel Treadle Lathe
  (c1815), tube making using a Drawbench (c1800), Rose Engine,
  and straight line turning. Interesting use of vintage tools.
  Recommended for Group and individual use. 

  http://www.nawcc.org/Library/vhs2.htm 

I ordered it on the internet from Barbara Darby, the lady publisher
in England.

Good luck!

Drew

Andrew Horn
The Master’s Jewel
Handcrafted Masonic Jewelry
http://www.mastersjewel.com