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Vigor Heat sheild


#1

I have a soldering problem, a colleague has requested that I try to repair
an antique ring set with seed pearls which involves soldering the shoulder
of an 18CT ring. Will the use of Vigor Heatsheild be sufficient to protect
the pearls? Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks from Christchurch in the deep south where the autumn
leaves have just fallen.


#2

Hello! what ever you do do NOT try to solder any thing with a pearl on it
you will kill it!! especially 18kt. to much heat!! you must remove the
pearls!!! before you try to solder!!

@GoldSmithy


#3

I have not had any very successful experiences using heat shield on
stones much tougher than pearls, so I am not in favor of using it very much.
Then there is also the problem of pickling the repair once it is
soldered–pearls can’t take the acid either. I’d like to add a question
to yours–when repairing a piece with stones in it, supposing the stones
are OK, how do you go about safely pickling it?


#4

I have a soldering problem, a colleague has requested that I try to
repair an antique ring set with seed pearls which involves soldering the
shoulder of an 18CT ring. Will the use of Vigor Heatsheild be sufficient
to protect the pearls?

Thanks from Christchurch in the deep south where the autumn
leaves have just fallen.

There are too many unknowns to give an answer over the net. How far is the
seam from the pearls? How heavy is the ring? How thick is it at the seam?
Is the metal between the seam and pearls heavy or thin? And most
important, what is the skill level of the torch holder? As far a heat
shields, get the stuff that looks like fibrous insulation and keep it wet.
Although other products may come in bright fourescent colors, they do not
work as well. Alan Revere in sunny Marin


#5

Hello:

I am a 20-yr vetern in jewelery repair. It’s hard to advise you since I
can’t actualy see the ring. Needless to say it will be tricky at best.
Are there a lot of pearls? If not, I would advise soaking the ring in
acetone for a few hours. The pearls should all come off easily to be
recemented after repair. If this is not practical, I would pass on the
job if I were you. The pealrls would be impossible to match if you smoked
a few and, unless you factor the cost of replacing them all into your
price, it would be best not to try it at all. Better a live coward than a
dead hero. Heat shield is a very useful tool if used in moderation.
Pearls are VERY heat sensetive and if the heat shield should dry out
(which can happen quickly) you’re dead.

Steve K.


#6

Hi ElegantBee
In this kind of situation and only when it is possible, that mean the
solder can be do in a place away from the fragile parts and only if the
jewel is light constructed. I submerge the stones in water using only flux
(no boric acid with methanol), after the solder I use a old file to file
the surface doing no pickling. Of course the flame must be very hot and
the soldering very fast using easy solders. Hope this help. Vincent Guy
Audette


#7

what ever you do do NOT try to solder any thing with a pearl on it
you will kill it!! especially 18kt. to much heat!! you must remove the
pearls!!! before you try to solder!!

With all due respect to Thumper, this is not a hard and fast rule. It is
true that pearls can take NO heat and the glue on the post softens with
heat as well, which is one way to remove a pearl. But, in many cases
soldering can be carried out without damaging a pearl if: -the seam is far
from the pearl -the seam is separated from the pearl by a thin piece of
metal -the pearl AND nearby metal are isolated with an effective heat
shield -the torch is hot and goes in and out quickly -the jewelry is made
of a low thermally conductive metal, such as platinum -the jewelry is
soldered with an electric soldering machine or a laser welder I am sure
that there are other cases when this can be done, but cannot think of them
right now. AR


#8

Brad Severtson
At least two other cases remain where the pearl need not be removed
before welding the bottom of the shank…1. The piece is cyber-jewelry,
and can be repaired by keystroke. 2. The piece is of mythilogical origin,
then can be repaired by slaying the dragon. My teachers rule was quite
easy to remember…You don’t have to remove any pearls from my customers
jewelry before you weld on the ring…but you do have to hold those pearls
in your fingers while you work on the ring…since you and the pearl and
the glue will burn at about the same temp, do what you think best.

And yes there have been a few times I’ve not removed the pearl…
My pieces only not customers pieces. Even in
todays laser and sparky world his words ring true. But need a little cost
analysis. Compare cost of removing pearl and resetting about $3 to any
potential loss of reputation due to damaging my customers priceless
antique pearl. Not to mention my burnt fingers. I have a way to
repair the ring. Would I invest a grand into a sparkie to do similar
jobs…maybe…would I invest in a laser welder to do similiar jobs…not
today… Back to the original message. Can you trust heat shield to
protect the seed pearls? …short answer… no


#9

At least two other cases remain where the pearl need not be
removed before welding the bottom of the shank…1. The piece is
cyber-jewelry, and can be repaired by keystroke. 2. The piece is of
mythilogical origin, then can be repaired by slaying the dragon.

Hello John Doe:

By placing the heat sensitive part of the ring under water in a
pouring crucible or tuna can or similar container that will not melt
(held by your third arm) you can heat the shit out of the shank all the
way down to melting it to the water line without affecting the stones or
pearls. You must use a hotter flame for underwater soldering. I switch to
Oxy/Acetlene for the job. It is a tool that I use often.

I believe the original post was a solder very close to the pearls. I have
used this heat shield soaked with water pretty close to pearls or stones
but it has to be very hot and fast or the water vaporizes and your heat
sink is gone. Wet toilet paper wrapped aroud the ring and pearls works,
but again it must be fast. Alot faster than some might feel comfortable
doing.

Michael Mathews Victoria,Texas USA


#10

John Doe,

Although it is necessary on many occasions to remove pearls before
working on a piece, it has not proven to always be worth the extra effort.

You don’t have to remove any pearls from my customers
jewelry before you weld on the ring…but you do have to hold those
pearls in your fingers while you work on the ring…since you and the
pearl and the glue will burn at about the same temp, do what you think
best.

Good advice! And if you use a Hoke, Midget or Little torch with oxygen
and natural gas, propane or acetylene you may find this a very reasonable
alternative to wasting your time and your customers money on Attack and
regluing time.

Not to mention my burnt fingers.

After nearly thirty years on the bench, I have yet to burn my fingers
sizing a ring. If they get too warm, it is time to quench the work and
perhaps try a new tactic.

Can you trust heat shield to protect the seed pearls? …short answer… no

Why not? As long as the mud is wet, it is still cool!

Bruce D. Holmgrain
e-mail: @Bruce_Holmgrain


phone:: 703-593-4652