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Vessel - Holding Place


#1

Materials: copper
Dimensions: 7" x 2.5"

Raised 16g sheet copper, patina finish.

Photo credit: Abby Johnston

Daniel Marcucio
Handmade luxury
Portland, Maine. USA

Formal visual elements such as material, form, function, color, and space manifest themselves as ideas for design. Those elements inhabit various forms and are reshaped into subtle ideas. These ideas are carried out with techniques familiar to metalsmithing and applied to the objects in a way that shows sensitivity for design through an understanding of making. Designing and making are not a separate process and are connected so that expression of idea and object directly link back to the same person.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#2

Materials: copper
Dimensions: 7" x 5.25"

Raised 16g sheet copper, chased and repousse, and patina finish.

Photo credit: Abby Johnston

Daniel Marcucio
Handmade luxury
Portland, Maine. USA

Formal visual elements such as material, form, function, color, and space manifest themselves as ideas for design. Those elements inhabit various forms and are reshaped into subtle ideas. These ideas are carried out with techniques familiar to metalsmithing and applied to the objects in a way that shows sensitivity for design through an understanding of making. Designing and making are not a separate process and are connected so that expression of idea and object directly link back to the same person.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#3

Materials: sterling silver, Kilkenny limestone handle
Dimensions: 16 " (H) x 8" (L) x 3" (W)

Vessel, sterling silver, Kilkenny limestone handle.

Formed, fabricated and patterned sterling silver. Carved and textured Kilkenny limestone.

Photo credit: Kevin O’Dwyer

Kevin O’Dwyer
Tullamore, County Offaly. Ireland

For over 30 years O’Dwyer’s artwork has explored the subtleties of ritual and imagination. Irish prehistoric art, bronze-age artefacts, early monastic metalwork, 20th century design and architecture are his creative influences. Equipped with this visual vocabulary O’Dwyer has created artefacts that often combine the textured surfaces and flowing lines of our past with the strong and austere forms of modern architecture. His ultimate goal has been to create a work of art that is timeless, thought provoking and responsive to the human spirit.

O’Dwyer is internationally renowned and represented in both private and public collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; The National Museum of Ireland, The High Museum, Atlanta, The Ulster Museum, Belfast, The Kamm Teapot Foundation, Celestial Seasons, Colorado, The Company of Goldsmiths, Dublin, The Racine Museum of Art, Nelson Mandela, King Karl Gustas of Sweden and The Japanese Imperial Family. He has represented Ireland in over 40 international exhibitions and has been featured in over 200 publications including Ireland’s Treasures, 5000 years of Artistic Expression by Dr. Peter Harbison


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#4

Materials: Sterling silver, Bog Yew (4,000 years old) handle,
Dimensions: 16" x 7" x 4"

Vessel, Sterling silver, Bog Yew (4,000 years old) handle

Formed and fabricated sterling silver. Carved/shaped Bog Yew

Photo credit: Kevin O’Dwyer

Kevin O’Dwyer
Tullamore, County Offaly. Ireland

For over 30 years O’Dwyer’s artwork has explored the subtleties of ritual and imagination. Irish prehistoric art, bronze-age artefacts, early monastic metalwork, 20th century design and architecture are his creative influences. Equipped with this visual vocabulary O’Dwyer has created artefacts that often combine the textured surfaces and flowing lines of our past with the strong and austere forms of modern architecture. His ultimate goal has been to create a work of art that is timeless, thought provoking and responsive to the human spirit.

O’Dwyer is internationally renowned and represented in both private and public collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; The National Museum of Ireland, The High Museum, Atlanta, The Ulster Museum, Belfast, The Kamm Teapot Foundation, Celestial Seasons, Colorado, The Company of Goldsmiths, Dublin, The Racine Museum of Art, Nelson Mandela, King Karl Gustas of Sweden and The Japanese Imperial Family. He has represented Ireland in over 40 international exhibitions and has been featured in over 200 publications including Ireland’s Treasures, 5000 years of Artistic Expression by Dr. Peter Harbison


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#5

Materials: Sterling silver, Bog yew (carbon dated 4000 years old)
Dimensions: 16" x 8" x 5"

Coffee pot. bog yew handles (carbon dated 4,000 years old)
Formed, fabricated and patterned sterling silver.

Photo credit: Kevin O’Dwyer

Kevin O’Dwyer
Tullamore, County Offaly. Ireland

For over 30 years O’Dwyer’s artwork has explored the subtleties of ritual and imagination. Irish prehistoric art, bronze-age artefacts, early monastic metalwork, 20th century design and architecture are his creative influences. Equipped with this visual vocabulary O’Dwyer has created artefacts that often combine the textured surfaces and flowing lines of our past with the strong and austere forms of modern architecture. His ultimate goal has been to create a work of art that is timeless, thought provoking and responsive to the human spirit.

O’Dwyer is internationally renowned and represented in both private and public collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; The National Museum of Ireland, The High Museum, Atlanta, The Ulster Museum, Belfast, The Kamm Teapot Foundation, Celestial Seasons, Colorado, The Company of Goldsmiths, Dublin, The Racine Museum of Art, Nelson Mandela, King Karl Gustas of Sweden and The Japanese Imperial Family. He has represented Ireland in over 40 international exhibitions and has been featured in over 200 publications including Ireland’s Treasures, 5000 years of Artistic Expression by Dr. Peter Harbison


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#6

Materials: Sterling silver and fine copper
Dimensions: 4 inches high x 1.5 inches diameter

This Sheffield Plate cylindrical vessel was born of the furnace and the forge, using the techniques of the “Sheffield Plate” workers of 18th century England to create a contemporary piece of metal work. The sterling silver was fused to fine copper in a furnace to create a silver/copper laminated billet. The silver is about 10th the thickness of the copper. The billet was then beaten, forged and annealed to ensure perfect joining of the two metals. It was then rolled slightly and the pattern was cut through the silver layer using a drill. It was rolled out again into a sheet, by which time the copper had filled the cuts created by the drill. The sheet was then formed into the vessel. The outside shape was not trimmed and the surface was gently scoured to a fine matte finish, then gently heated in a flame to oxidize the copper and enhance the pattern. It is a decorative piece.

Photo credit: Hamish Bowie

Hamish Ian Cameron Bowie
Birmingham, UK

Since beginning a career in jewellery design aged 17, my career has taken me through apprenticeship, graduate, designer, lecturer and craftsman. Based in the famous Birmingham Jewellery Quarter, I also spent time in Edinburgh, working as a designer for Hamilton and Inches, Jewellers by Royal Appointment.

Having spent many years in the 1990’s attempting to recreate and replicate the lost 18th Century tradition and process of producing Sheffield fused plate, whereby sheets of silver and copper are fused together in a furnace and then rolled to produce laminated sheets, I took the production to greater heights of creativity by scoring through the silver to create uniquely patterned laminated sheets.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#7

Materials: Sterling silver fused onto fine copper
Dimensions: 3 inches diameter x 5 inches tall

This Sheffield Plate cylindrical vessel was born of the furnace and the forge, using the techniques of the “Sheffield Plate” workers of 18th century England to create a contemporary piece of metal work. The sterling silver was fused to fine copper in a furnace to create a silver/copper laminated billet. The silver is about 10th the thickness of the copper. The billet was then beaten, forged and annealed to ensure perfect joining of the two metals. It was then rolled slightly and the pattern was cut through the silver layer using a shaping machine. It was rolled out again into a sheet, by which time the copper had filled the cuts created by the shaping machine. The sheet was then formed into the vessel. The outside shape was not trimmed and the surface was gently scoured to a fine matte finish, then gently heated in a flame to oxidize the copper and enhance the pattern. It is a decorative piece.

Photo credit: Hamish Bowie

Hamish Ian Cameron Bowie
Birmingham, UK

Since beginning a career in jewellery design aged 17, my career has taken me through apprenticeship, graduate, designer, lecturer and craftsman. Based in the famous Birmingham Jewellery Quarter, I also spent time in Edinburgh, working as a designer for Hamilton and Inches, Jewellers by Royal Appointment.

Having spent many years in the 1990’s attempting to recreate and replicate the lost 18th Century tradition and process of producing Sheffield fused plate, whereby sheets of silver and copper are fused together in a furnace and then rolled to produce laminated sheets, I took the production to greater heights of creativity by scoring through the silver to create uniquely patterned laminated sheets.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#8

Materials: Sterling silver fused to fine copper
Dimensions: 4 inches high x 1.5 inches diameter

This Sheffield Plate cylindrical vessel was born of the furnace and the forge, using the techniques of the “Sheffield Plate” workers of 18th century England to create a contemporary piece of metal work. The sterling silver was fused to fine copper in a furnace to create a silver/copper laminated billet. The silver is about 10th the thickness of the copper. The billet was then beaten, forged and annealed to ensure perfect joining of the two metals. It was then rolled slightly and the pattern was cut through the silver layer using a bullnose cutter in a milling machine. It was rolled out again into a sheet, by which time the copper had filled the cuts created by the bullnose cutter. The sheet was then formed into the vessel. The outside shape was not trimmed and the surface was gently scoured to a fine matte finish, then gently heated in a flame to oxidize the copper and enhance the pattern. It is a decorative piece.

Photo credit: Hamish Bowie

Hamish Ian Cameron Bowie
Birmingham, UK

Since beginning a career in jewellery design aged 17, my career has taken me through apprenticeship, graduate, designer, lecturer and craftsman. Based in the famous Birmingham Jewellery Quarter, I also spent time in Edinburgh, working as a designer for Hamilton and Inches, Jewellers by Royal Appointment.

Having spent many years in the 1990’s attempting to recreate and replicate the lost 18th Century tradition and process of producing Sheffield fused plate, whereby sheets of silver and copper are fused together in a furnace and then rolled to produce laminated sheets, I took the production to greater heights of creativity by scoring through the silver to create uniquely patterned laminated sheets.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.


#9

Materials: Sterling silver fused onto fine copper and brass
Dimensions: 12 inches tall and 6 inches diameter

This Sheffield Plate cylindrical vessel was designed to be a representation of “Sheffield Plate” in 18th century England. The brass cylinder represents the roller that would have been used in the industrial rolling mills, with the sheet of Sheffield Plate being created at the end of the process. The sterling silver was fused to fine copper in a furnace to create a silver/copper laminated billet. The silver is about 10th the thickness of the copper. The billet was then beaten, forged and annealed to ensure perfect joining of the two metals. It was then rolled slightly and the pattern was cut through the silver layer using a bullnose cutter in a milling machine, attached to a rotary table to achieve circular designs. It was rolled out again into a sheet, by which time the copper had filled the cuts created by the machine. The sheet was then formed into the vessel. The outside shape was not trimmed and the surface was gently scoured to a fine matte finish, then gently heated i n a flame to oxidize the copper and enhance the pattern. It is a decorative piece.

Photo credit: Hamish Bowie

Hamish Ian Cameron Bowie
Birmingham, UK

Since beginning a career in jewellery design aged 17, my career has taken me through apprenticeship, graduate, designer, lecturer and craftsman. Based in the famous Birmingham Jewellery Quarter, I also spent time in Edinburgh, working as a designer for Hamilton and Inches, Jewellers by Royal Appointment.

Having spent many years in the 1990’s attempting to recreate and replicate the lost 18th Century tradition and process of producing Sheffield fused plate, whereby sheets of silver and copper are fused together in a furnace and then rolled to produce laminated sheets, I took the production to greater heights of creativity by scoring through the silver to create uniquely patterned laminated sheets.


These containers and vessels definitely hold their place in the world of stunning art objects as well as in the world of metalsmithing.

Since the dawn of time humans have created containers to hold things that were important to them, from large vessels to hold food and harvests to intimate containers for small precious things. They might hold memories, ashes, medicine, beverage, fruit or food - but all spring from the imagination and skill of the maker. Some have specific religious functions, some are meant for everyday use. When one thinks of a vessel or container the inclination is to think of something with solid walls - yet many of these works involve the exploration of positive and negative space, and the use of negative space to help create the illusion of the wall of the vessel.

As the world’s largest jewelry related internet site, Ganoksin strives to develop exhibitions showcasing work from around the world. This exhibition was open to all metalsmiths, professional and amateur, advanced and beginner. Participants are from The Netherlands, the USA, Canada, Australia, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom, Israel, Hong Kong, Colombia, Romania, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Malaysia and Denmark. While most of the pieces are by an individual metalsmith, some are collaborations, one of three artists spanning 50 years.

In total 319 artists contributed 729 show pieces for the permanent online exhibition.

Objects in the exhibition include boxes, lockets, urns, ash containers, bowls, wine cups, reliquaries, match holders, vases, teapots, pitchers, sugar bowls, baskets, nests, pillboxes, clutches and a range of sculptural forms. A variety of techniques are showcased covering a wide range of metalsmithing techniques. Materials used include everything from gold and silver to less expensive metals. Ornamentation includes the addition of enamel, chasing and repousse’, gemstones and found objects.

The exhibition was curated by Beth Wicker, President of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths in the United States, and Adjunct Instructor at Northeastern Technical College in South Carolina. Director of the exhibition is Hanuman Aspler, founder of The Ganoksin Project, the world’s largest internet jewelry site.