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UV exposure


#1

Hi Orchid members: since the subject has begun (a thread)? Allow me
to suggest that we all protect our eyes and their parts with 100% UV
coating on all glasses and even on our safety glasses. Most eye
glass stores will do this on any eyewear. My latest application of
this will be on the pool goggles. My glasses for just everymoment
are now coated to change into sunglasses and also are 100% UV even
when clear. My last eye exam disclosed a "dot-like a beauty mark"
somewhere inside the eye’s interior. I did do welding (arc) for a
while but was a great beach suntanner, too. Take care.

from June, RJTwin @aol.com


#2

The polycarbonate lenses in common use today do furnish a very high
degree of protection for all normal UV exposure. For special craft
type exposures probably the best advice and protection can be
obtained from Mike at: http://www.auralens.com

He knows your problems.

Jesse


#3

Hi all,

I may have found the answer to my own question. My concern was about
the recent discussion of possible harmful UV rays coming off
fluorescent light fixtures. I had just installed a couple on my
bench.

Well I did some searching this evening for low UV fluorescent bulbs.
And apparently they exist. There are low UV bulbs made for food
service situations. These bulbs are coated and filter the UV. They
look a bit pricey. There are also tube covers available that filter
the UV rays. These are more affordable and to protect if the bulb was
to shatter. Very interesting.

Below is some of the text describing the tube covers. If fluorescent
bulbs actually cause the kind of deterioration that is described, I
certainly would prefer to filter the bulbs that are so close to my
face when I am working. -Carrie Nunes

The UV blocking Tubeguard blocks all UV emissions below 400
nanometers. This new innovate product includes a reusable clear UV
blocking tubeguard with safety end caps. The UV blocking tubeguard
covers the fluorescent lamp to control UV emissions without reducing
or changing visible spectrum. The clear UV Block tubeguards are
designed for locations such as MUSEUMS, CLOTHING RETAILERS, FURNITURE
STORES, FOOD retailing and processing. UV radiation from fluorescent
lighting can B3Bleach OutB2 colors damage food products and destroy
valuable collectible items. The clear UV Block Tubeguards and end
caps are designed to retain shattered glass and phosphors if the lamp
is broken. Invisible Ultra-Violet rays from the sun and artificial
sources such as fluorescent lamps cause immense damage to displays,
paintings, books, watercolors, and fabrics. Fluorescent lamps
transmit almost the same wavelength of UV and visible light as the
sun. Although fluorescent UV is not as strong as UV sunlight, the UV
radiation from fluorescent lighting, and the sun will gradually
induce fading, deterioration of organic materials and damage to the
colors and fibers. The ANSWER - Ultra-Violet absorbing filters for
fluorescent lights, windows, and recessed ceiling lighting troffers.


#4

Orchidians, several posts on fluorescent lighting have intimated
that it is a “known” fact that fluorescent UV increases an
individual’s risk of developing melanoma. A 1992 study (quoted in The
Journal of Epidemiology) was done at McMaster University in Hamilton,
Ontario and concluded that “fluorescent light exposure remains a
potential risk factor for melanoma.” But no single study in science
makes for fact, and the jury is quite out…The problem is further
compounded by some rather scary promotional material by companies in
the lighting field who manufacture filters and who stand to reap
tremendous profits by instilling fear in the public.

A 1995 study (also in the same journal) of UV risk factors in
melanoma found an increased risk with sundburn but “no association
was noted with use of fluorescent lights.” Likewise, a National
Radiological Protection Board study of various fluorescent lights and
UV risk concluded: In summary, under the conditions of this analysis,
it is still possible to adhere to the conclusion of the 1988 study
that at commonly used illumination levels the UVR emissions presented
neither an acute nor a significant chronic hazard."

We went through this with cell phone scare, and the latest
conclusion seems to be that there is no added risk of cancer with
cell phone use. In fact I recall reading a paper in The New York
Times by a woman physicist who works with a defense department lab
where volunteers are actually put in microwave chambers–they’ve been
doing this for many years with no ill effects. In short, my search
of the literature showed a tremendous amount of on
cancer risk and the PCBs that may be found in the ballasts of
fluorescent fixtures, but relatively few studies and no conclusive
evidence of a link between melanoma and fluroescent UV. Now… what
kind of lighting are they using at the NIH?? Marty R.

Some Links:
http://www.nrpb.org/radiation_topics/ultraviolet/uv_from_lamps.htm
http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/135/7/749?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&titleabstract=fluorescent&searchid=1055645945794_1004&stored_search=&FIRSTINDEX=0&journalcode=amjepid
http://aje.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/141/10/923?maxtoshow=&HITS=150&hits=150&RESULTFORMAT=&titleabstract=fluorescent&searchid=1055646145107_1018&stored_search=&FIRSTINDEX=0&journalcode=amjepid


#5
    I may have found the answer to my own question. My concern was
about the recent discussion of possible harmful UV rays coming off
fluorescent light fixtures. I had just installed a couple on my
bench. Well I did some searching this evening for low UV
fluorescent bulbs. And apparently they exist. There are low UV
bulbs made for food service situations. These bulbs are coated and
filter the UV. They look a bit pricey. There are also tube covers
available that filter the UV rays. These are more affordable and to
protect if the bulb was to shatter. Very interesting. Below is some
of the text describing the tube covers. If fluorescent bulbs
actually cause the kind of deterioration that is described, I
certainly would prefer to filter the bulbs that are so close to my
face when I am working. -Carrie Nunes 

You shouldn’t need to get “special” filters. You should be able to
go to your local plastics distributor and pick up raw sheets of
mueseum-grade UV-filtering plexiglass for pretty cheap. Acrylite FF
OP-3 is one option that my local plastics place carries.

The important part about protecting shattering is protecting flung
objects like out-of-controll jewelery parts, shattered seperating
disks, etc. from hurting your tubes, not your tubes exploding. The
former is much much much more likely than the latter. :wink:

Ken “Wirehead” Wronkiewicz \ \ /
http://www.wirewd.com/wh/ \ \