Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Using the jump ringer faq?


#1

I’ve been going through the posts in here for using the JR and KK,
but I’m still not finding answers to some pretty basic questions I
have. Is there a FAQ out there somewhere for beginner questions like:

  • How do I keep my coil from unwinding when I take it off the
    mandrel?

  • I’m going to cut the coil in a JR, is it ok to tape it first to
    keep it from uncoiling?

  • Is it better to use dead soft or half hard wire? etc.

Thanks all,
Jan


#2

Jan,

All you need to do to keep the coil from unwinding is, as soon as
you have reached the end, give it a half turn backwards. Voila! no
recoil, no tape residue, no mess.

Use dead soft, it will work harden as you wind it.

Terrie


#3
I've been going through the posts in here for using the JR and KK,
but I'm still not finding answers to some pretty basic questions I
have. Is there a FAQ out there somewhere for beginner questions
like: 
Q: How do I keep my coil from unwinding when I take it off the
mandrel?

A: Because of the nature of wire, there will always be a bit of
"spring back". If you are maintaining proper tension during the
winding process, the spring back should be minimal.

Q: I'm going to cut the coil in a JR, is it ok to tape it first to
keep it from uncoiling? 

A: Most people actually do tape their coils, but not for the reason
you suggest. The tape is there to stabilize the coil during cutting.
No amount of tape will prevent springback. Sooner or later, you’re
going to let go of the coil. When you do, the wire will assume the
position it wants to be in.

Q: Is it better to use dead soft or half hard wire? etc. 

A: This is so much a point of personal preference. I’ve heard that
half hard wire cuts better, but haven’t tried it personally, so I
can’t say for sure. I prefer working with dead soft wire. It makes
winding the mandrels a bit easier, and the rings get work hardened
through the weaving process anyway, and a bit more so if they’re
tumbled too. If the rings eventually get soldered, it is completely a
moot point.

Betty


#4

Hello Jan,

Let me introduce myself. I am the inventor and manufacturer of the
Jump Ringer. With many years of experience as a professional jeweler
and specifically in the production of jump rings, I can answer all
your questions. While there is no online FAQ, I will be happy to help
get you started. If you will email your phone number and a time that
would be convenient for you, I will call you and answer all your
questions.

Ray Grossman
@Ray_Grossman4


#5

Hi Jan,

- How do I keep my coil from unwinding when I take it off the
mandrel? 
- I'm going to cut the coil in a JR, is it ok to tape it first to
keep it from uncoiling? 
- Is it better to use dead soft or half hard wire? etc. 

I’ll try to answer your questions.

The easiest way to keep a coil from unwinding a little after it’s
cut from the wire supply is to wrap it with a layer of masking tape.
You should unwind the coil 1 or 2 wraps before covering it with tape
or you may not be able to get it to slide off the mandrel.

Another way to reduce the unwrapping is to use dead soft wire to
wrap the coil. The harder the wire temper is, the more the coil will
unwrap when it is cut from the wire supply. It should be noted
though, that every coil of a given size that is wound from the same
wire supply will unwrap the same amount & all coils/rings made from
those coils will be the same diameter.

I’m not sure about the JR, but it’s ok to cut coils wrapped with
masking tape in the Koil Kutter.

The wire used to make coils depends on the intended use of the
rings. Generally, the amount a coil made from 1/2 hard wire unwinds
after removing from the mandrel doesn’t affect the overall appearance
of the finished item. The important thing to remember is to make ALL
the coils used in the item from the same wire supply.

Dave


#6

Greetings, Jan! Your questions were:

- How do I keep my coil from unwinding when I take it off the
mandrel? - I'm going to cut the coil in a JR, is it ok to tape it
first to keep it from uncoiling? - Is it better to use dead soft
or half hard wire? etc. 

The wire you are using, is it half-hard? The springy quality of
half-hard will explain any unwinding. Start with dead soft. It will
work-harden in the course of unfurling, measuring, and coiling.

I have had a coil collapse in the cutting phase. A lack of internal
coil support, ie, and expendable dowel, was the cause. Your coil
holder may be an older model with a shallow vee-trench, making
support highly necessary, especially where wire is fine and coil ID
is relatively large (my other problem).

Please no taping. Rather, lube the positioned and clamped coil.
Lubing the cutter blade causes the lube to sling off with centrifugal
force. Merry-go-round action!

To achieve your omelette, break many brass and copper eggs.

Dan Woodard,
Indian Jewelers Supply Company


#7

As a blade wears, it will gradually begin to generate burrs. Factors
that contribute to this are:

  1. Dulling of blade’s teeth caused by wear.

  2. Softness of wire. Dead soft wire while picking up some small
    degree of hardness in winding,and tumbling is not as hard as half
    hard wire and will tend to produce more and larger burrs when other
    variables are the same.

  3. Liberal use of a good stick cutting lubricant will reduce heat.
    Heat will anneal the blade’s steel and cause it to wear prematurely.

Because of the above, We recommend the use of half hard wire with
the caveat that you compensate for spring back by using smaller
diameter winding mandrels than with dead soft and back pedaling a few
turns before cutting your wire at the end of your winding.

We also strongly recommend inserting the largest size wooden dowel
that will fit inside your coil and cutting the coil while it is on
the dowel and supported by it. For small rings use bamboo skewers
(available at supermarkets). For larger ones purchase 1/8", 1/4" and
3/8" dowels from a home improvement center or a hardware store near
you.

We find that if the above is followed, the use of tape is
unnecessary. It won’t help but it also won’t hurt.

Hope this helps you.
Ray Grossman


#8

I was indeed using half hard sterling wire. I gather from the replys
that I am not using proper wire tension (I’m guessing I’m under
rather than over.) Dead soft or perhaps fine silver sounds like a
good answer for that.

I did have some coil mashing on the first attempt, but moving the
coil to the opposite end so that the blade was cutting up into the
coil rather then down into it fixed that, at least on the wire I was
using it did. (I’ll have some dowels ready for when that proves to
have been beginners luck though.)

“To achieve your omelette, break many brass and copper eggs.”

LOL!

Thanks for all the replys, and info.

~Jan


#9

Hi

I’ve just started using the Jump Ringer. Instead of wood dowels I
use a roll of paper inside the coil of wire. There is always some
scrap paper around to cut up. I make the roll a little longer than
the coil I am going to cut. The paper expands to the size of the
coil. I do put some tape around the part that will be cut last. The
tape is to keep the last part of the coil from pushing back off the
roll of paper as you cut it. Then I keep the rings on the paper and
slide them off as I use them. I am making loops for a loop-in-loop
chain a la Jean Stark.

It would be nice if there were a faq sheet for the Jump Ringer
posted somewhere. My metals teacher has an old Jump Ringer. (I say
it is old because she has a second small ring holder with only one
vee groove as well as the larger one with four vee’s.) She has lost
the instruction sheet and does not recall the exact method of
cutting.

Ardetta Bronson
detyr AT att.net


#10

Hello Ardetta,

This is the first time I’ve heard of using a roll of paper inside
the coil to support it during cutting — interesting. I’d like to
discuss this and the other issues you brought up.

If you would post your phone number on orchid or email it to me with
a time that is convenient for you, I’d like to discuss them with you.

Thank you.
Ray Grossman Inc.
Manufacturers of Jump Ringer