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Using ring roller


#1

Great tip about using a ring roller to tighten channel-set bands!
The studio I teach in purchased a ring-roller, which came without
any instructions. I think I see how it is supposed to work, but,
when I try to use it, the ring tends to stay in its original
orientation when I roll, so only one spot gets worked on. Is there
a trick to this? Thanks! --Noel


#2

sounds like disaster to me to try to tighten a channel on a roller.
These machines, called Kagen’s are great if when you are 1/2 shanking
a ring and you intended to even out the metal to shape. There are
jewelers in the malls that use this to size rings, then polish out,
but to ever tighten channels, even if there is a shortcut sounds very
risky to me. Scott Isaacs


#3

Noel, If the ring shank is too thick so that the gear teeth won’t
engage it probably won’t work. Use a die that has a deeper groove
until you get the shank thin enough so that the gear teeth mesh.

Jerry in Kodiak


#4
Great tip about using a ring roller to tighten channel-set bands!
The studio I teach in purchased a ring-roller, which came without
any instructions. I think I see how it is supposed to work, but,
when I try to use it, the ring tends to stay in its original
orientation when I roll, so only one spot gets worked on. Is there
a trick to this? Thanks!      --Noel 

You are putting too much pressure on the ring. Try to roll a little
at a time, and hold ring tight. Bill Dr. E. Hanuman Aspler
Webmaster


support@ganoksin.com

		[ G a n o k s i n . C o m ]

#5

Noel, To keep the ring from moving while sizing, hold the top of the
ring tightly in one hand while you roll the die across the back of
the shank with the other hand. Use gentle pressure and roll across
the ring. Then tighten a little more and roll across the shank
again. Check your size often so that you do not over size it.

Trying to tighten the die too much will cause the die to dig in the
shank and it will slide around the center roller. Remember this
tool is not intended to stretch a ring up 3 or 4 sizes. Depending
on the shank’s thickness it can stretch rings up a quarter size to
one size. It is also useful to even out an old shank while sizing
up, by rolling down any high spots. It will also make an easy job
of making square wire into half-round.

Brad SimonDr. E. Hanuman Aspler
Webmaster


support@ganoksin.com

		[ G a n o k s i n . C o m ]

#6

I know of Bradney and enjoy some of his articles and writings, but
this “idea” is not that great, sorry Brad! Just what happens is one or
two “tables” of the stones is a tad too high, you mean using a
rolling mill to squeeze the blessed stones into the channel setting.
Ever heard of diamond dust? I just don’t wish to hear the offending
noise of diamonds breaking. I don’'t suggest anyone “try this at home
/ shop” crunch! crunch! split! and other uttered sounds! In theory,
it might seem great, but in all practicality, wooops! I still prefer
the individual “hand to tool” securing method. Time saved is totally
time / money lost! Dont try this! “Gerry, the cyber-setter !”
www.gemzdiamondsetting.com@Gerald


#7

Tools are interesting just like a hammer can be used by someone to
demolish & by others to build. The 17 Roller Stone Set Ring Stretcher
was developed by a German artist to do exactly what it says to
enlarge a Ring (that has stones set in it) without removing the
stones. The metal on the shank is stretched by rolling back & forth
and the various rollers are for the different shank profiles. There
are some brave jewelers who talk about stretching eternity rings
with this tool. (Sounds like the big fish) Yes you could use it to
tighten stones but

  1. be sure the ring is round or you could be stretching some of the
    metal.

  2. Stones are set evenly with none sticking out & all of them are
    same size.

  3. if Murphy’s law does not apply to you.

Personally I would not advise this because (I think we should let
the stone setter make his living) any adverse outcome would be a big
punishment. Kenneth Singh.