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Using Bonnie Doon Saw Guide


#1

Am in need of a few steel dyes done quickly so I don’t have the turn
around time to have them professionally done. Borrowed a friend’s
Bonnie Doon Jig. Have the correct steel and instructions. What’s the
trick to using this? I believe between my husband and myself, within
an hour we broke 10 saw blades. Normally I am not one to break blades
so not sure what we are doing wrong here.

Is there something else that works better for dye cutting?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Liane Redpath-Worlund


#2
What's the trick to using this? I believe between my husband and
myself, within an hour we broke 10 saw blades. Normally I am not one
to break blades so not sure what we are doing wrong here.

Uh, you’re sawing steel here, right? Making dies is pretty hard.

Is there something else that works better for dye cutting? 

Nope, you’ve got the best system right there.

Elaine
http://www.CreativeTextureTools.com
Hard to FInd Tools for Metal Clay


#3
within an hour we broke 10 saw blades. Normally I am not one to
break blades so not sure what we are doing wrong here. 

There is a real learning curve to the cutting, I found. Only 10 per
hour sounds good. My first go at it I went through a dozen and a
half. When I was doing much of this, I’d order sawblades by the
gross! The more you cut, the better at it you become. You have to
learn the right feel to the cutting. I think the blades also wear
out more quickly on the steel.

Donna in VA


#4

Hi, the problem is that thinner saw blades make stronger dies, but
are more difficult to use without breaking them. So, when you are
learning, use heavier saw blades, and the appropriate slant, as given
in Susan Kingsley’s book, and the instructions. As with all sawing,
slow and steady wins the race.

Cynthia Eid
http://www.cynthiaeid.com


#5
Have the correct steel and instructions. What's the trick to using
this? I believe between my husband and myself,  within an hour we
broke 10 saw blades 

I should have been more thorough when I wrote this last nite. The
problem is when we have the base plate of the jig at the proper
angle, we cannot see exactly where the saw blade is cutting. We’ve
moved the lights, tried different chairs, etc. Because the saw is
locked into the equipment it’s hard to maneuver around.

Is this a common problem that just takes practice?

Liane Redpath Worlund


#6
I think the blades also wear out more quickly on the steel. 

They sure do! And then they break. But many of the breaks are due to
pushing too hard and moving the sheet wrong.

M’lou


#7
What's the trick to using this? I believe between my husband and
myself, within an hour we broke 10 saw blades. 

The main “trick” in using the saw is making sure that the metal is
not allowed to lift off of the bench pin on the up-stroke. Thinking
back during those instances when the blade broke, it was probably
accompanied a loud noise as the metal lifted and then slapped back
down against the bench-pin.

The primary culprit causing this is the accumulation of metal dust in
the cut.

Lee Marshall