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Using binding wire when soldering


#1

Hello all,

I have read references to using binding wire to hold pieces in place
for soldering. It seems that the piece can be pickled with the wire
in place - is this accurate? Up to now, I’ve pinned to my soldering
brick when keeping things in place was critical, but that has its
limitations.

Now I have the binding wire from Rio and am asking for a description
of technique as well as any helpful bench tips people have to offer.
I am thanking you all in advance and really excited about your
responses.

A special thanks to Hanuman for the opportunity he provides us all to
ask for help.

Judy, in Kansas

Judy M. Willingham, R.S.
Extension Associate
221 Call Hall Kansas State Univerisity
Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-1213 FAX (785) 532-5681


#2

If you plan on putting binding wire into the pickle–make sure that
the binding wire is stainless steel so your piece doesn’t get plated!


#3

Judy,

Regarding the use of binder wire, its covered extensively on pg. 89
of Alan Revere’s book, Professional Goldsmithing. That’s a great
book to have in your personal collection whether you work in gold,
silver, or whatever. I wish I had read this part before I had to
start completely over on piece which was for sale and had to redesign
a fancy bead I was making for myself.

I’ve never used anything except the blackish wire wich I assume is
mostly iron, and I never ever put it in the pickle.

Hope this is helpful,
Joyce


#4

Judy, The binding wire should be removed before putting the soldered
items into the pickle. Binding wire is made of soft iron and will
immediately contaminate your pickle.

It is simple to remove the wire…simply hold the piece with a
tweezers and use side cutters to cut the wire. Then unwind it. If the
piece becomes too cool to place in the pickle by the time you remove
the wire simply heat it with your torch - then into the pickle.

Don at The Charles Belle Studio where simple elegance IS fine
jewelry!


#5
    I have read references to using binding wire to hold pieces in
place for soldering.  It seems that the piece can be pickled with
the wire in place - is this accurate? 

No it is not. You have read the posts about iron plating copper onto
silver or gold when in the pickle with them. well, binding wire is
iron and so it must be taken off before the piece is pickled. I
quench it in water and then remove it before pickling.

Yes, every technique has its limitations. That’s why the more you
know, the more you know. (I think that is a corollary to - No matter
where you go, there you are.

By the way Judy, I was born in KS. Only lived there two years, then
CA. If you have some interesting rocks, pearls, fossils, whatever
I’d be interested in a trade. let me know @gregor

best wishes g


#6
    I have read references to using binding wire to hold pieces in
place for soldering.  It seems that the piece can be pickled with
the wire in place 

G’day, Judy Willingham. I wouldn’t; your sterling will get copper
plated if you pickle with iron binding wire still in place; it only
takes a moment to snip it off. OK, so if it does get plated it isn’t
all that much of a big deal to remove it. But why set yourself an
unnecessary task?

If you have to bind your work in such a way that the binding wire has
to go across the joint, the binding may become soldered to it. My
trick is to put a tiny bit of paper under that part of the wire, and
solder as usual, using a minimum of solder and most often then, the
binding doesn’t solder to the job, though the solder will have run
throughout the sterling join. (if you have cleaned and fluxed
properly, and made certain both pieces are in perfect contact.) The
paper, of course will have burnt right away. Quench the job in water,
remove the binding and THEN pickle.

Cheers, and don’t get yourself in a bind. –

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#7
   I have read references to using binding wire to hold pieces in
place for soldering.  It seems that the piece can be pickled with
the wire in place - is this accurate?  

There are two types of iron binding wire you can buy. The common one
is black iron wire. That must be removed from your work before
pickling or it can cause copper to plate out of the pickle. However
if you’re using stainless steel wire, it can stay on.

Peter Rowe


#8

Peter Rowe, For what its worth one of the cheapest ways to buy
stainless steel wire is to get it in rolls sold as on spools as MIG
welding wire. It is easily available in 0.023 inch size and comes in
rolls from one pound to 25 pounds, with the price per pound
decreasing the larger the roll.

Geo.


#9

Judy: Be sure your binding wire is stainless steel if you are going
to put it in the pickle. Frances

Visit me or “beam me up” at:
http://members.toast.net/frangro//index.html


#10

Judy: Be sure your binding wire is stainless steel if you are going
to put it in the pickle. Frances

And another advantage to using stainless wire(or pins, if you pin
your work to a firebrick, or whatever) is that you don’t have to worry
about it ending up accidentally soldered to your work.
Margaret