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Units Conversions Utilities for Jewelers @ Ganoksin


#1

All;

Please be a bit more international? … Ganoksin has the online solution…

Use our “Online Units Conversions Utilities for Jewelers” - Free as usual :slight_smile:

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/area.htm

Support: Square meter, Square centimeter, Square millimeter, Square foot,
Square inch.

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/circular.htm

Support: Circumference, Radian, Degree, Grad.

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/weight.htm

Support: Metric: Kiloton, Tonne, Hundredweight, Kilogram, Newton, Gram,
Carat, Milligram, Avoirdupois (U.S.): Long Ton, Short Ton, Long
Hundredweight, Short Hundredweight, Stone, Pound, Ounce, Dram, Grain,

Troy: Pound, Ounce, Pennyweight, Carat, Dyne, Grain,

Apothecaries: Pound, Ounce, Dram, Scruple, Grain,

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/length.htm

Support: Metric: Kilometer (km),Meter (m), Decimeter (dm), Centimeter
(cm), Millimeter (mm). British And American: League, Mile (mi), Furlong
(fur), Chain (ch), Rod (rd), Yard (yd), Foot (ft), Inch (in).

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/pressure.htm

Support: Metric: Pascal, Milibar, Kilopascal. Bar. Mercury: Inch of
mercury, Centimeter of mercury, Milimeter of mercury.

Other: Pound per square foot, Pound per square inch (psi), Atmosphere.

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/temprature.htm

Degrees Celsius, Degrees Fahrenheit, Degrees Kelvin

[] http://www.ganoksin.com/MetalCalc/volume.htm

Support: Metric: Cubic meter (cu m), Hectoliter (hl), Decaliter (dl),
Liter (l), Milliliter (ml), Cubic centimeter (cu cm), Cubic millimeter (cu
mm), U.S. Liquid MeasuRe: Acre foot, Cubic yard (cu yd), Barrel, Cubic
foot (cu ft), Gallon (gal), Quart (qt), Pint (pt), Gill (gi), Fluid Ounce
(fl oz), Cubic inch (cu in) Fluid dram (fl dr) Minim (min)

U.S. Dry MeasuRe: Cubic yard (cu yd), Barrel, Bushel (bu), Cubic foot (cu
ft), Peck (pk), Gallon (gal), Quart (qt), Pint (pt), Gill (gi), Dry Ounce
(dr oz), Cubic inch (cu in), Dry dram (dr dr), Minim (min),

British Imperial Liquid And Dry: Bushel (bu), Peck (pk), Gallon (gal),
Quart (qt), Pint (pt), Gill (gi), Minim (min)

The index page can be found at:

I hope you will find these utilities useful, and don’t forget to bookmark the page.

Hanuman
Your Host :slight_smile:


#2

Dr. Aspler, I enjoy your signature “your Host.” I would only add, “the
Host with the Most.”

Thank you,
Teresa


#3

Hanuman,
Sorry to be so dense but “How do you use them?”.

Hanuman’s reply:
Very easy actually, Fill one field with the value you want to
convert, and hit the “calculate” button, You will see immidiatly all
the other fields containing the values after conversion. To start
again hit the “clear” botton.


#4

The metalcalc utilities are great, especially useful for me when
ordering metal.

Another conversion utility that people might find useful is a small
program called convert.exe obtainable at http://www.joshmadison.com/.

The program is freeware and works very well when loaded on your local
machine.

Chunk Kiesling


#5

Whilst we are on the subject or units etc -

I have recently been getting a lot of enquiries for the states for
hand made wedding rings etc. Does anybody know how your US American
numerical sizes translate to our UK alphabetical ones? Or faling that
what the mm internal circumferences for each American numerical size
are?

Also sometimes it is just not practical for me to hand make rings for
US customers and would love to be able to recommend a few people over
there hand making to customers’ requirements but don’t know any of
your work at all although I imagine you are all brilliant! What is
the best thing to do? Should I point customers at Orchid or would that
be a bit of a nightmare? Thank you in advance for your help, Harriet,
Hitchin, UK


#6

Hanuman, your solution to Martin’s problem is elegant and timely.
Thank you. Much more efficient than Ron’s proposed Global Inch Police
concept. Geo.


#7

Harriet - Check the following link for a table with comparative ring
sizes.

http://home.att.net/~brixner/ring_size_table.htm

Steve.

Steven Brixner - Jewelry Designer - San Diego CA USA
mailto:@Steven_Brixner4
http://www.brixnerdesign.com


#8

Hello Harriet,

I'm sure a great list could be assembled of Orchidians in the US

capable and willing to receive your customers - probably even at
least one in every state. My suggestion regards your question on
sizing. Why not buy a set of ring sizers and mandrel with US sizes.
Go to this website previously mentioned on Orchid, and check out the
metal ring size tester & mandrels - supposed to have US, Millimeter,
International, and CU sizes.

http://www.widgetsupply.com/html/gt-jewelers_tools.html
_$11.99 - Item #: jt-BD31 Metal ring size tester
$11.99 - Item #: jt-BD30 SILVER anodized stick ring sizer

Good luck, Judy in Kansas where the redbuds are positively gorgeous!

Judy M. Willingham, R.S. Extension Associate 221 Call Hall Kansas
State Univerisity Manhattan KS 66506
(785) 532-1213 FAX (785) 532-5681


#9

Harriet

English Metric Continental American
A 37.8252 - .5
A+.5 38.4237 - .75
B 39.0222 - 1
B+.5 39.6207 - 1.25
C 40.2192 - 1.5
C+.5 40.8177 - 1.75
D 41.4162 1 2
D+.5 42.0147 2 2.25
E 42.6132 - 2.5
E+.5 43.2117 3 2.75
F 43.8102 4 3
F+.5 44.4087 - 3.25
G 45.0072 5 3.25
G+.5 45.6057 - 3.5
H 46.2042 6 3.75
H+.5 46.8027 - 4
I 47.4012 7 4.25
I+.5 47.9997 8 4.5
J 48.5982 - 4.75
J+.5 48.5982 9 5
K 49.7952 10 5.25
K+.5 50.3937 - 5.5
L 50.9922 11 5.75
L+.5 51.5907 - 6
M 52.1892 12 6.25
M+.5 52.7877 13 6.5
N 53.4660 - 6.75
N+.5 54.1044 14 7
O 54.7428 15 7
O+.5 55.3812 - 7.25
P 56.0196 16 7.5
P+.5 56.6580 - 7.75
Q 57.2964 17 8
Q+.5 57.9348 18 8.25
R 58.5732 - 8.5
R+.5 59.2116 19 8.75
S 59.8500 20 9
S+.5 60.4884 - 9.25
T 61.1268 21 9.5
T+.5 61.7652 22 9.75
U 62.4026 - 10
U+.5 63.0420 23 10.25
V 63.6804 24 10.5
V+.5 64.3188 - 10.75
W 64.8774 25 11
W+.5 65.4759 - 11.25
X 66.0744 26 11.5
X+.5 66.6729 - 11.75
Y 67.2714 - 12
Y+.5 67.8699 - 12.25
Z 68.4684 - 12.5

Hope this helps - lifted from ExchangeFindings catalogue !!!

Andy Parker, Agate House Lapidary
Ulverston, Cumbria, England
@Andy_Parker
www.agatehouse.co.uk
Tel: 01229 584023


#10

Dear George,

Hanuman’s gracious gesture of providing us with a table of
measurement conversions merely points out the chaos that we live with
when it comes to measurement. We are now living in a nanosecond world
and using volumetric measurements which may have had their origins in
the number of chicken feathers which you could stuff in a dried
goats’ bladder.

I shudder to think that when I launch my web site featuring designer
cabochons that I may have to describe a stone as being 15/32" by 1
and 11/64" inches! Should I then describe its’ weight in ounces
avoirdupois ! On second thought, the majority of the world,nay,
even Americans, have adopted the metric equivalents for purposes of
specifying dimensions and weight of stones.

Change, leading to standardization, WILL occur…it is inexorable
and has nothing to do with popular opinion. It is the product of
massive universal forces which prompt natural processes to evolve
into ever more logical relationships not unlike survival of the
fittest. That which functions best is more likely to survive !

You don’t have to “police” change…it has a mind of its’ own.
Nonetheless, we can recognize the superior efficiency of a given
system and encourage its adoption. Furthermore, we can easily see
that in a world of mass confusion, generated by archaic and endlessly
disparate systems, there is a huge opportunity to dispel the chaos
that it engenders.

Those of us who deal on a daily basis with the general
public…especially the older segment, come to realize that humans
have a very hard time dealing with change. When our local supermarket
shifts stock around in the store as a response to computer generated
models of what is selling and what isn’t the older clientele go
berserk because they lose track of where things are ! Personally, I
am exasperated by the increasing complexity of modern automobiles.
You can’t do your own repairs anymore because they are too frigging
complex ! Nonetheless, you have to adapt! I used to think that the
smartest way to buy a car was to track down an old “cherry” that had
been driven very few miles by the proverbial old lady from Pasadena.
The problem is that you are probably going to have a devil of a time
getting it to pass a smog test and, if it has a carburetor, finding a
mechanic who can tune one is getting increasingly difficult. Nowadays
I am inclined to think that a better way is to get a car that is a
couple of years old and has had an opportunity to get the bugs out.
You then drive it for about eighty per-cent of its projected life
expectancy and dump it ! Furthermore, if you plan to take a lengthy
trip, you are better off renting a nice new car which, if it breaks
down in the middle of Death Valley, becomes the problem of the
agency. ( Not to mention the fact that it is cheaper to rent than it
is to own ,assuming that you are renting a car with unlimited mileage
)

Any way you look at it, the human experience is one of learning,
experimenting, improving…and, coping with change! Ron at Mills
Gem, Los Osos, CA.