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Ultrasonic solutions


#1

Hello all:

I was wondering what everyone thought was the best ultrasonic
solution.

Michael Mathews Victotria,Texas USA


#2

I use parsons sudsy lemon ammonia with clear water. I have to
change it more frequently, but it really gets the gunk out.


#3

Oakite BCR (buffing compound remover) is the one most industrial
trade shops use… its the purple stuff you buy repackaged for twice
the price. A 5 gal drum is about $60 and goes a LONG way. Oakite
1 800 231 5040 I t cleans quick and is easy on the hands. It is
formulated just for bufing compounds.

For cleaning behind stones before working use Pure Magic.
Fargotsteins and I think Swest have it. It cleans the stuff outta
the back of stones that two hours in a top sonic cannnot clean.
Put a small amount (1 oz) in a small sealed jar and suspend in your
cleaner. I dont know whats ion it but it works!

To clean rouge from behind diamonds, if the piece is true 14k and
the solders are too, use 14kt nitric testing solution. a few
drops around just the stones and a ten or twenty seconds , followed
by a rinse in the sink then a cleaner bath will get out even the
most stubborn rouge… REMEMBER THIS IS A DANGEROUS ACID! dont get
it on your hands… it will cause them to turn brown. dont get it
on other metals or stones, it may damage them, and DONT EVER EVER
use around CYANIDE or follow cyanide down the drain without LOTS of
water in between.


#4

I find amonia cleaners overpowering (on the nasal passages) . I
have been using “Gesswein Multipurpose Ultrasonic Solution” ( sold
in concentrate) with very good results. Pricy though. Darryl of Nova
Scotia


#5

best ultrasonic solution Oakite BCR

Frank Houston, tx.


#6

I use Mr. Clean and warm water. Great stuff, even gets out gunked
up bobbing compound.

Nancy


#7

Mike If you do a lot of polishing try BCR you can get it form
lathrops in Houston Tx. I have used just about all the cleaners you
can buy after 25yr. of working on jewelry bcr is the best.

                                                   Jack
                                           WWW JVP JEWELRY.COM

#8

There was a thread a while back on removing the crud from behind
diamonds. Several people used Red Devil Lye or similar. I don’t
remember the exact concentration, but I would say start with a
couple of tablespoons per quart of water. A little safer than the
nitric acid. People used it to soak, but I don’t think in the
ultrasonic.

Roy (jess)


#9
I was wondering what everyone thought was the best ultrasonic
 solution. 

Micheal,

I use a non-ammoniated consentrate (can’t think of name) from
Gesswein. Its expensive ($150.00+ for a 5 gallon bucket). The
reason I like it, aside from the fact it works, is that the
polishing compound settles to the bottom overnight. In the morning
we just pour the clean stuff off the top into a bucket and then
pour the sludge from the bottom into a separate container (for the
refiner). So it lasts a week or two even with constant use.

Mark P.
Wisconsin


#10
I use a non-ammoniated consentrate (can't think of name) from
Gesswein. 

Hello Mark: If you could find the name I would be most
appreciative if you could tell me the name. How long does it take
to cleabn a diamond ring? It is important that I can clean a
diamond ring very well in about 5 minutes of ultrasonic.

Michael Mathews Victoria,Texas USA


#11
   There was a thread a while back on removing the crud from
behind     diamonds. Several people used Red Devil Lye or
similar.  I don't     remember the exact concentration, but I
would say start with a     couple of tablespoons per quart of
water.  A little safer than the     nitric acid.  People used it
to soak, but I don't think in the     ultrasonic.

We keep a beaker full of a saturate solution of red devil lye in
our hot ultrasonic all the time. Some people think that is too
strong, but it works great. You just have to be careful and keep
people who don,t know what they are doing away.

Ray


#12

I use simple green from the auto parts store, It works great and
is biodegradeable, and has a plesant odor. Vernon


#13

What works great is CR Ultra from Stuller and after it’s been in
there for awhile I put the items in the other Ultrasonic with Mr.
Clean, comes out great!

                                                       Gary Gregory
                                                        Medford, OR

#14
   If you could find the name I would be most appreciative if you
could tell me the name. How long does it take to cleabn a diamond
ring? It is important that I can clean a diamond ring very well
in about 5 minutes of ultrasonic. 

Hello Michael,

Its the Gesswein all purpose ultasonic cleaning solution, (or
something very close to that). Like I said before, the quality I
really like is that the compound settles overnight so you can pour
off clean solution in the morning. I keep using it until it doesn’t
feel slippery anymore, usually a week or two. We do alot of work,
so the ultrasonic is running all day and is warm. It certainly will
clean the polishing compound off of an average diamond ring in less
than 5 minutes. That said, I have tried most of the others that
people were recommending and they all work pretty well, I just like
the settling factor and that it doesn’t stink.

Mark P.
Wisconsin (50 degrees in February, weird)


#15

Hey folks. Been lurking for a while and thought to throw my 2
cents worth in. I’m frivolous with big money. Gesswein
Ultrasonic Cleaning Solution. 40:1 conc. 5gal pail $198.00
96catalog price. Like Mark says it can carry quite a load. We
used it in a shop handling 100-150 jobs/day, general repair to
custom. Fast, effective, expensive.

Folks mentioning lye. Works well. Eye hazard and extremely
caustic. Has anyone else tried TSP? Trisodium phosphate. Available
most grocery and hardware stores. Its used to wash and prep walls
,etc. for painting. I use it as a quick bath when tipping crud
filled clusters and the like. Not as caustic as the lye and works
as well for me.


#16

Yup! the other thing I have found TSP great for is washing my
kitchen floor. With 3 dogs and a #300 pig in the house, this is a
real boon! Sally in the ohwowthetulipsaretryingtocomeupBluegrass


#17

Greetings all. Had a discussion with several other jewelers I know
about which solution to use in an ultrasonic. Some swear by ammonia
and water, others will swear by specific brands, some say it should
be ammonia free. Thought I would see what every one here has to say.
Thanks for your input. Joe Joseph Martin Genesis Jewelry
@Rockhead1 828 635 0293


#18

Rockhead, I have been chasing the “right” ultrasonic cleaning
solution for over 20 years. Two years ago a customer of mine who is
in the industrial supply business successfully filed a patent for a
water soluble, non-toxic cleaner that GETS THE JOB DONE! He gave me
some and I’ve never looked back. I get 20 gallons from one gallon,
it smells fine, no weird fumes and is priced competitively. Both the
Air Force and the Army now use it to wash their planes and vehicles,
etc. You can flush it without violating any laws, and it works
fast. It’s called Tuff Job and I get ni kickbacks here, but the man
to call is Bill Thomas at dtom42@harbornet.com. They sell it in many
sizes and everyone I’ve suggested it to has adopted it. Good luck,

Wayne Emery


#19

As a result of an Orchid post a while back, I’ve been using a strong
solution of Simple Green and water. As far as I can tell it works
just as well as commercial ultrasonic solutions I’ve used as well as
ammonia, detergent and water.

Jerry in Kodiak


#20

Hello Joe: I use a product from Stuller co. called “Ultra CR”. I mix
it in a 1 part solution to 3 parts water and use that for 1 week
before I change it. I am a full time bench jeweler and clean many
items a day and it works the best of any I have tried. It brightens
silver somewhat and cleans the stuff off stones quickly so I’m not
waiting around forever to solder. It is a bit pricey at aprox. $40.44
US dollars a 2.5 gallon container, but it beats breathing Ammonia
fumes all day. Ammonia has proven to be bad for gold.
Michael R. Mathews Sr. Victoria, Texas