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Type IIa diamonds


#1

Since I deal only in colored gem stones - I don’t know a whole lot
about diamonds. I came across this article about Type IIa diamonds
and found it to be quite interesting:

Type IIa is a rare type of diamond that contains no measurable
amounts of Nitrogen. Nitrogen is the impurity that imparts the yellow
color in diamonds…

Golconda orType IIa Diamonds; Big Prices at Auction
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/il

Apparently Type IIa diamonds command a much higher price in the
market.

Best regards,
Robert P. Lowe Jr.
Lowe Associates - Brasil


#2
Type IIa is a rare type of diamond that contains no measurable
amounts of Nitrogen. Nitrogen is the impurity that imparts the
yellow color in diamonds... 

I attended the preview of the auction and have seen the stone that
mr Wise is writing about. Very nice indeed. I have to caution though
not to assume that Type IIa and Golconda diamonds are the same thing.
It is true that a lot of Golconda diamonds are of type IIa, but
there is another property, which is not a part of modern lexicon of
gemology. Mr. Wise very briefly touches upon the subject, which
actually requires much more attention.

When we speak of diamonds types, we referring to percentage and
distribution of impurities in a diamond. When we mention Golconda, we
referring to quality of “water”. Type II has a minuscule amount of
nitrogen in it’s lattice compared to type I, but that does not mean
that type IIa crystal lattice is perfect. Temperature and pressure at
the time of the formation of a diamond ( and other gemstones ) are
important factors. Somehow, stars lined up just right, when Golconda
deposit was formed, and it produced a lot of stones of finest water.

Concept of “water” is not easy to define and impossible to measure,
but if you have seen it, you will never forget it. Concept of water
in scientific terms is a perfection of crystal structure, which
manifests in several gem attributes.

When gemstone is formed, very few of them have perfect crystal
lattice, due to environmental changes. That causes lattice to be
slightly deformed. That causes optical characteristics of a gemstone
to be slightly off. Not a big deal, until you would be lucky enough
to handle gemstone without these deformities, or what it used to be
called “finest water”. Concept of water is what truly makes gemstone
precious.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#3
I attended the preview of the auction and have seen the stone that
Mr Wise is writing about. Very nice indeed. 

Which diamond?? He talks about several different diamonds in his
article.

I saw the 30.72 ct diamond, at a dealer’s office in NYC, that was
mentioned in this article:

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/j3

I was impressed, and I usually find diamonds to be boring - colored
stones are much more interesting, in my opinion - but rarely command
such prices.

Best regards,
Robert P. Lowe Jr.
Lowe Associates - Brasil


#4
Which diamond?? He talks about several different diamonds in his
article. 

It is the item 272 in the auction list. I actually went to see
sapphire ring ( item 48 ). It was appraised in half a million. On
the picture it looked like ring head is leaning to the side. I could
not believe that ring that expensive, can be made so badly, so I went
to confirm it, which I did to my utter chagrin.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#5

For those who might not be familiar with the term ‘water’ as applied
to I found the discussion in Richard Wise’s book, Secrets
of the Gem Trade, to be helpful. In it the author refers to ‘water’
as the combination of color and transparency. The author also refers
to ‘water’ as diaphaniety which pertains to “…a limpid quality, an
ultra-transparency that fine gems will exhibit.” He also adds that
’water’ "…is not to be confused with clarity but is a quality in
which light appears to pass through the stone as if it were totally
unimpeded, almost as if light were passing through a vacuum."
Without going into the rest of the discussion presented in the book,
it is noted that Golconda diamonds (or some of them) are reputed to
exhibit this extraordinary transparency.

On a personal note, one day while snorkeling in a reef-protected
body of warm Caribbean water, the water unlike most of the time,
seemed to be absolutely flat and still… not even the smallest,
tiniest, waves. Rather like a bath tub full of warm water than has
been left alone long enough to become perfectly still. As I floated
looking down through 90 feet of water, I realized the stillness
allowed the sunlight to pass right to the sandy floor below allowing
me to pick out even the smallest, crispest details. I couldn’t see
the ‘shafts of sunlight’ in the water but it illuminated the coral
forms and sea life unimpeded, like a spotlight.

At one point I even stretched out my hand to ‘touch’ the bottom as
the clear stillness of the water seemed to negate the distance to the
seafloor. It was as if it was just a couple of feet below me. Of
course I couldn’t, it was 90 feet away… but that’s the sensation I
had… the transparency of the water ‘drew’ me into the scene and was
so compelling that it seemed possible to reach out and touch the
sandy seafloor. At any rate that’s when I decided that the term
’water’ applied to gemstones was, for me, analogous to looking
through a pool of absolutely still, perfectly clear, well lit, warm
water. It doesn’t matter whether or not there is anything ‘in’ the
water (such as inclusions in gemstones), it is the absolute still
clarity of the water that draws the vision in, revealing all in an
unimpeded manner.

That’s how I perceive ‘water’ in As Mr. Wise and Mr.
Surpin state, it is not easy to define.

I have no connection to Richard Wise or his book, just enjoyed
reading it. I do wish I had a connection to some warm Caribbean water
right now though. Unfortunately, I don’t.

Joe
Bloomington, Indiana


#6

Not having all that much experience or… Oh man. Trying to say-
Mr Surpin. From my reads “every day” of the forum, It has lead me
to… GEEEZE Where are my words!! You grumpy ol’ man. Please Please
never leave this forum. You are a gem more valuable than any earthly
stone, and it is with great appreciation I read your posts, and
chuckles, gain insite, and canonly wish to achieve the smallest
amount of knowledge that is playing upin your gray. Not to mention
the talent needed to relay what you have in your vids…
Thank You

later dudes


#7
You are a gem more valuable than any earthly stone, and it is with
great appreciation I read your posts, and chuckles, gain insite,
and canonly wish to achieve the smallest amount of knowledge that
is playing upin your gray. Not to mention the talent needed to
relay what you have in your vids 

Thank you very much, but you are far to kind and way to generous, in
your appraisal of my modest abilities. I do manage, from time to
time, to put together something, which others find attractive, and I
was told that my habit of stating the obvious is somewhat
entertaining.

Your compliment is gracefully accepted, even if it is not deserved.

leonid surpin
www.studioarete.com


#8

Up until a few weeks ago, I had never even heard of a type IIa
diamond. Then I saw the 30.72 carat, D color, flawless, triple ex,
type IIa round at a dealer’s office in NYC

http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/j3

and now they seem to be turning up almost once a week.

a pair of 23.49-carat and 23.11-carat D, potentially flawless, type
IIa earrings http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/kb

and now there is even a 10.99-ct. fancy intense pink, natural color
VS1 clarity classified as a type IIa.
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/kc

I wonder if the tough times are making people dig things out of the
safe which they normally would not put up for sale??

Best regards,
Robert P. Lowe Jr.
Lowe Associates - Brasil


#9
I wonder if the tough times are making people dig things out of
the safe which they normally would not put up for sale?? 

I think you are right. Check out what Sotheby’s have for sale
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/kh

truly unique piece.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#10

Leonid Surpin

I think you are right. Check out what Sotheby's have for sale
http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/kh 

Many thanks for suggesting we should view this wonderful awesome
video… (I’ll spend a whole day just looking and drooling at it in
person…Can you imagine that every diamond hole was carved out by
hand…this was long before the setter had any burs to use. If fact,
the name of the carving tool was called a “bull stick” I have one of
them.

Did I not mention that this Tiara creation was crafted without the
use of a flex-motor or “GraverMax”…:slight_smile: The setters had only a
"pump-drill" to core out each pilot hole…Each hole was then made to
fit that particular “Mein-Cut” diamond. This is an epitome of diamond
setting to the max…

Gerry!


#11

The workmanship is remarkable. And the beauty of the tiara speaks
for itself. I wonder what the auction will fetch.


#12
Did I not mention that this Tiara creation was crafted without the
use of a flex-motor or "GraverMax"..:) The setters had only a
"pump-drill" to core out each pilot hole...Each hole was then made
to fit that particular "Mein-Cut" diamond. This is an epitome of
diamond setting to the max... 

It is quite remarkable. We are so used to modern conveniences that it
is even hard to imagine how much work in a piece like this. Stones
were not calibrated; every setting needed adjustment using gravers;
no microscopes; no special lighting; not even optivisors. We have
tools which are thousands times better than they had, but could not
even touch their level of quality. Not even in dreams. Another things
is that piece is not even signed. The guy who made it, didn’t even
think it was a big deal.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#13

Leonid - that auction blew me away - I don’t think I have ever seen
that many D - IF diamonds…and that lla Pink!!! WOW!

Have you seen the Christie’s Geneva Auction? there is a 66+ carat
Diamond being offered.

Here’s the catalog: http://www.ganoksin.com/gnkurl/kw

BTW - something that I noticed in the Christie’s Auction - hold onto
those drawings - the offerings are so much more complete with the
illustration of the design.

Robyn Hawk
http://dailyjewel.ganoksin.com


#14

It’s too bad, these pieces probably won’t sell for much, you know
with all that moth ball smell.


#15
Have you seen the Christie's Geneva Auction? there is a 66+ carat
Diamond being offered. 

The quality of this auction is exceptional. And that brings me to ask
a question why? It is unlikely that so many well to do suddenly
developed money problems. After all, they are what is called “smart
money” crowd. Could it be that they smell the top in gold prices and
trying to take advantage of it ? Hard to know for sure, but the time
will tell.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#16
The workmanship is remarkable. And the beauty of the tiara speaks
for itself. I wonder what the auction will fetch. 

The estimate is 4 to 9 million swiss francs. The auction is in
Geneva. We should know soon enough.

Leonid Surpin
www.studioarete.com


#17

Gerry, If I am correct in understanding you, you will be going to
view this auction. If so, please look at the back of this tiara. In
the video, near the end of the clip, the viewer can get a three
quarter view of the mount. I am very curious to know whether the
center and adjacent emeralds are removable. I am wondering if they
convert to drops? If possible, let us know. The economy of dual usage
might be viewed as an inability to afford multiple pieces, thus
reducing social standing. I am interested in knowing whether dual
usage is found among the great treasures of antiquity. Secrets of
nobility, so to speak. I love the practicality of convertible
jewelery, but I am not burdened with maintaining my social standing.

Regards, Kevin


#18
developed money problems. After all, they are what is called
"smart money" crowd. Could it be that they smell the top in gold
prices and trying to take advantage of it ? Hard to know for sure,
but the time will tell. 

Interesting thought. I think I’d have to agree that everyone is
digging out everything to sell for some reason. I just recently sent
in some scrap metal for refining and was wondering why it was taking
so long to hear from the refiner. When we placed a call to them
today to ask, they said they were backed up because they had
received so much material for processing as scrap, they couldn’t
keep up with the rush. People are sending in their silver flatware,
tea sets and other pieces looking to raise some cash.

What a world.

Caren Johannes
The Amethyst Rose


#19

Remember way-y back in the early 80’s when the Hunt brothers tried to
corner the market on silver? everyone went totally berserk and sold
all of their silver, its doing it again. if anyone reads “Kitco”. it
was announced a few days ago that there would be a market correction,
guess what its doing it now. Silver dropped $7.00 in three days!

Hold on to your silver and wear seat belts, there might be a dive
going on…

Gerry!


#20

I cannot even imagine such jewels anywhere near me. On the Sotheby’s
website, I especially love the “bid now” link. Oh, and I signed right
up for “My Sothebys…”

Mary Barker