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Two-Part Molding Compound


#1

Hello all - I took a PMC class this weekend and one of the techniques
we used was to press PMC into a mold.

The molds were made from a product that sounded like “Bellicold.” It
came in two separate jars, one blue, one purple. When mixed together
it sets up very quickly, and a three-dimensional object can be placed
in it, forming a mold of that object in minutes.

The instructor said that it was available in the Rio Grande catalog,
but I couldn’t find anything like it. Also looked at Fire Mountain
Gems, and Dick Blick. Have tried doing a google search for all
variations of the spelling and also looking at various PMC sites to
see if they mention it.

I’m just about stymied, so I thought I would call upon the assembled
expertise here to see if anybody knows what this product is and where
I can get some. If all else fails, I will attempt to track down the
instructor, but I’m inspired and I don’t want to wait! I also don’t
want to ask her because she sells it, and there will inevitably be a
markup, I’m sure.

Any ideas?

Thanks in advance,
Linda


#2

Linda: The product you are looking for is Bellicold Silicone Compound,
available at Rio Grande in their Tools and Equipment 2001 catalog,
item #701033, page 58, priced at $28.75. I hope this helps. it’s a
fun product to use.

Pat in Chicago


#3

Hi Linda, The cold mold compound is available from www.contenti.com
It’s in their casting section of their catalog under mold making and
it’s model # 179-037 You can also call them at 800-343-3364 Hope this
helps. Daniel Grandi

We do casting,gold, silver, bronze,pewter and finishing , moldmaking
for people in the trade


#4

The correct spelling is Belicold which is a registered trademark
also. It is in the Rio Grande catalog on page #58. The you can call
1-800-545-6566 and ask for stock# 701-034. It is a two part compound
you knead together. You don’t have to vulcanize or heat it. Just
clamp and cure at room temp. It also has 0% shrinkage. Hope this helps

Phillip Scott GG
Rio Grande


#5
    The molds were made from a product that sounded like
"Bellicold."  It came in two separate jars, one blue, one purple. 
When mixed together it sets up very quickly, and a three-dimensional
object can be placed in it, forming a mold of that object in
minutes. 

G’day. this substance sounds to me like a very close relation to the
stuff beloved by motor body dent repairers - here they call it 'bog’
but it is sold under many different brands. It is a two part styrene
based plastic which when hard, can be filed, drilled, sawn, etc quite
easily. You would have to use a mould release agent, and I imagine a
good coating of talc powder would do that. It sets up quite quickly
which is one reason it is used in the repair industry, and when they
fill a dent, then smooth it off, finally with fine wet-and-dry
papers, they spray finish it and you can’t tell what they’ve done! A
two part epoxy will also make excellent moulds; this will be a bit
more expensive than the ‘bog’ A good hardware DIY shop will sell
both materials. –

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#6

Dear John,

The two part auto body epoxies ( invented by my 2nd cousin Frank
David in the 1940’s) are not what we are talking about. This is a
flexible rubber compound that bends, twists, stretches and does
everything else needed to release fragile wax patterns without
breaking them-- even those with deep undercuts.

You can read more about CASTALDO Quick-Sil at:

http://www.castaldorubber.com/products/english/quicksil.html

Regards,
Michael Knight
CASTALDO


#7

Hi-- I can never resist a research for something I want to know about
as well…I used Copernic and came up with NADA for Bellicold… but I
figured it was a 2-part cold compound from what you said and went from
there… see if any of this makes sense…   Here are some
basics… IV. Polyurethane rubbers (PMC Series) are two-component
systems (base plus curative; A+B) that cover a wide variety of
applications at a relatively low cost. They are available for making
molds that are poured, brushed or sprayed onto a model.Advantages -
polyurethanes are easy to use, with many having a simple mix ratio by
volume (i.e. 1A: 1B) � no scale required. Flexible urethanes are
available in a wide hardness range from gel-like to harder than a car
tire and everything in between. Urethanes have relatively low
viscosity and �de-air� themselves � no vacuum degassing required.
Urethanes have good abrasion resistance and are used to cast abrasive
materials like concrete. They are less expensive than silicones and
polysulfides. Disadvantages � As silicone rubber has the best
release properties, urethane rubber has the worst release properties
and will adhere to just about anything. Thorough model preparation
(we�ll cover this topic later) is essential to successful mold making
with urethane rubber. Urethanes are moisture sensitive and may bubble
if exposed to too much moisture (making molds outside on a very humid
day, for example). Limited shelf life after opening � remaining
product may be affected by ambient moisture in the air. (Smooth-On
makes a product called �Xtend-Ittm� that greatly extends the shelf
life of unused urethanes). What Are 2-Component Rubbers? another
esourcse may be: http://www.plastermaster.com/usg/moldmaking.htm it
is more tahn you think of “plaster”… goes into flexible vs rigid
molds and materials… Google didn’t find anything either .under
bellicold… Is it Possible that “Bellicold” is not the name??.. let
me know if I can help… my PMC is sitting on shelf waiting for me to
have time-- and a bit of knowledge!!!.. Readying for yet another
show…

Debra
if you want to peek… www.cropcircle-jewelry.com


#8

.
Sender: owner-orchid@ganoksin.com
Precedence: bulk

G’day and thank you for your note. I understood that the original
message to which I replied was concerned with “pressing PMC into
moulds,” and suggested the ‘bog’ solely for the reason that it
would stay rigid; it would be difficult to get a facsimile from a soft
rubbery mould using a clay - like substance.

Cheers,
John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ


#9

G’day and thank you for your note. I understood that the original
message to which I replied was concerned with “pressing PMC into
moulds,” and suggested the ‘bog’ solely for the reason that it would
stay rigid; it would be difficult to get a facsimile from a soft
rubbery mould using a clay - like substance.

Cheers,

John Burgess; @John_Burgess2 of Mapua Nelson NZ