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Twisted Wire Bracelet


#1

Hello All, I have been inspired by some Viking jewelry as of late and
have been trying to figure out how to do a simple twisted wire
bracelet in sterling. You’ve all seen them done with a twist of fine
(maybe 20 ga.) and a piece of larger gauge. I can’t seem to get it
to lay right. I’ve tried chucking both pieces in a drill like I
twist two same size wires with success, putting in a vice and trying
to hand twist. I even tried soldering the two pieces together first
to keep them from slipping. With none of these techniques have I
gotten satisfactory results. Any suggetions out there by people who
have done this successfully.

Thanks in advance,
Chris


#2
Hello All, I have been inspired by some Viking jewelry as of late
and have been trying to figure out how to do a simple twisted wire
bracelet in sterling. 

I found something really interesting on the net a couple of days
ago, when doing a search on Michael Good and anticlastic raising.
Good went to a workshop in Ireland to demonstrate anticlastic rasing.
An Irish metalsmith asked himself how it was possible to produce
these very thin twisted bracelets in the iron age. He tried to figure
it out and eventually came to the conclusion that goldsmiths used two
deer antlers to generate the curves. According to him, Brian Clarke,
in no other way it would have been possible to make such very fine
twisted bracelets. Quite fascinating. See:

http://homepage.tinet.ie/~ybc/TorqueProject-1.html

Best, Will


#3
    Hello All, I have been inspired by some Viking jewelry as of
late and have been trying to figure out how to do a simple twisted
wire bracelet in sterling. 

I don’t know what the Viking bracelets look like, but the Indian
style bracelets made with two or more wires twisted together I do
like this: Start with well annealed wire. Cut them to the same
length. I usually do 4-10 ft. at a time, so perhaps that makes a
difference, compared to shorter lengths of wire. Chuck one end of the
two pieces into a heavy duty vise, chuck the other two ends into the
chuck of a low speed high torque drill. I happen to use a battery
operated drill anymore, but it needs to be a drill, not a
screwdriver. Put a fair amount of tension on the drill by pulling
back from the vise. The wires need to be kept straight while they’re
being twisted. Keep twisting until the weave is tight. When it breaks
off from hardening at the vise end, you’re done. The heavier the
wire(s), the more tension you have to use, sometimes using your whole
body to get enough tension to keep the wire straight if you’re doing
4 ga. wire. Try practicing on some cheap copper wire scraps to get
the technique down. Yes, I have fallen on my butt a few times.


#4

Chris, I don’t know if this will help, but do you realize that the
final twist is done in the opposite direction from the first twisted
wire components in a Viking style torque or bracelet? This is what
gives them the sort of woven look. Also, be sure to anneal after
twisting the first parts. I am not sure just what you are having
trouble with; perhaps you could explain in more detail. I made a
bangle bracelet for myself from 18 gauge sterling round wire, with 3
double-twist parts, and it came out fine. – M’lou Brubaker


#5

Hello Chris–one thing you might try is to add on another strand or
two of the thin skinny wire — do your twisting and then remove
(unwrap, untwist) the extra thin wires… it makes it twist up more
evenly… also remember to keep good tension (pull back) on the
wires when twisting them. I found removing wires makes for some
intresting textures and patterns. good luck Mark Kaplan


#6

Maybe this will help, try using half round, instead of round stock.
This project was in a Murray Bovin book:

11.5" 8g 1/2 round sterling, 28" 20g round. The 20g is doubled and
twisted, then laid on the flat side of the half round, then these
are twisted.

This will lead to a “smooth” looking finished piece vs. the
vine-twisting-around-a-pole look of using heavy round stock with
thinner twisted stock.

Best regards,
Margaret Langdell


#7

Hello Katherine: Here is a different twist (pun intended) on a wire
bracelet. I make silver wire bracelets out of several different
guages, 16,18.20, all dead soft. I am not sure whether you would
call it weaving-twisting or what. I use 3, 4,6, 8,and sometimes 10
strands of wire. I then bend these together like a person would
braid hair. You have to keep the strands close and the bends
tight. I generally loose about 25 percent of the length. I start
with 8" to 10" strands (longer for heavier wire). Then the wire is
pulled through a draw plate several times at different sizes (mm)
until the weave is nice and tight. If the final wire is too long
for a cuff or bangle I simply clip it off. (Looks like really
tightly twisted wire). Then I place it in a third hand with the
opening down and draw up a bead on the end with the torch. The
beaded end adds a nice finishing touch. Shape it by hand and use
light hammering on the mandrel to add the final shape. Next tumble
polishing for a couple of hours will add some spring strength.

Hello to all you Orchid members all over the world. A very bad car
wreck, cancer and some other health problems caused me to stop
making jewelry for 8 years. Eighteen months ago I started like a
babe in the woods to get actively involved. A fellow smith
suggested I subscribe to this board. The shared here by
Orchid members from all over the world has helped bring me up to
date on a lot of new technology.

Thank you Hanuman–

Earl in sunny Colorado


#8
     Hello All, I have been inspired by some Viking jewelry as of
late and have been trying to figure out how to do a simple twisted
wire bracelet in sterling. 

I returned recently from a wonderful week at the Penland School of
Crafts where I studied “Forging for Jewelers”. We made wonderful
twisted and reverse-twisted bracelets in an ancient design of copper
and silver using blacksmithing techniques. We started with 1/4-inch
rod of copper (practice) or silver (finished pieces); We first
forged (heating in a forge & hammering hot metal) about a 4-inch
length of rod into a double taper that was 6.5 to 8 inches long -
square cross-section in the center, tapering to rounded points on
each end. We then used a swage block to change the cross-section in
the center portion from a square to an X. Then we used torch heat, a
vise, and modified vise grips to create the reverse twist –
position the piece in a vise, apply direct heat with a torch, use
vise grips to slowly twist the piece first in one direction, then in
the other. Last, remove material to smooth the underside, then form
into a bracelet form. The result is a striking and beautiful
bracelet. I don’t know if this is perhaps the ancient design you are
referring to, but I thought it was worth sharing what I learned.

ginger ginger meek allen Little Cottage Studio one woman…in her
laundry room…hammering and soldering…while her children sleep
Wake Forest, NC, USA


#9

Eepsilverwrks: Your description of the twisted bracelets sounds
intriguing. Is it possible to post pictures of your work in the
Orchid picture server? Glad to hear that you’re back into jewelry
again after such personal tragedies. You’ll find many here in Orchid
Land who are/have been dealing with cancer and accidents as well, and
find great comfort in working in this field. Orchid members are a
great resource, network and support group. As always, Orchid rules,
as many of our young-at-heart friends are fond of saying.


#10
    Maybe this will help, try using half round, instead of round
stock. This project was in a Murray Bovin book: 11.5" 8g 1/2 round
sterling, 28" 20g round.  The 20g is doubled and twisted, then laid
on the flat side of the half round, then these are twisted. This
will lead to a "smooth" looking finished piece vs. the
vine-twisting-around-a-pole look of using heavy round stock with
thinner twisted stock. 

And an even easier way to do this is to twist the half-round, then
simply lay the twisted 20 ga into the crevice. Solder both ends and
Bob’s your uncle!

Margaret