Back to Ganoksin | FAQ | Contact

Tulip-shaped ends tubing


#1

Hello,

I was hoping to find somebody to form some tubing for…probably on
an hydraulic press. All it would be is straight tubing that has been
given a slight tulip or trumpet shape for about 40% of its length.
The lengths would be around 2.5" with inside diameter from about.280"
to.300" and wall thickness of about.020" to.030". I had a tip that
there would be people on this site who would know how to do this.
Stainless steel would be the best material if possible. This would
be in a very small quantity at first but could become much more
later and involve several sizes.

I’m an inventor with an idea for something which I believe I can
make all right except for shaping the tubing. That has me stumped
and it’s not the sort of thing most machine shops would be equipped
for.

Thank you for looking at this and I hope to hear from someone who
can do this.


#2
I was hoping to find somebody to form some tubing for...probably
on an hydraulic press. All it would be is straight tubing that has
been given a slight tulip or trumpet shape for about 40% of its
length. The lengths would be around 2.5" with inside diameter from
about.280" to.300" and wall thickness of about.020" to.030". 

Do a search for tube swaging, sounds exactly like what your
looking for. There are a myriad of companies that specalize in this
process in a number of materials…all starting with tubing and
achieving your final form, youll be amazed at the complexity of the
forms achievable. These companies are also setup for quantity runs as
well.

Good luck,
P@
www.patpruitt.com


#3
All it would be is straight tubing that has been given a slight
tulip or trumpet shape for about 40% of its length. 

Years ago I saw an exhibit at Goldsmiths in London that had bulges
stretched in tube as part of it’s construction. It said that this was
an old process rediscovered and was originally used to make the
hollow buttons that form the winder for large pocket watches.

I believe that this was done in the same way that the groove was put
in copper tube to form a hollow for the solder to sit in before ready
made fitting were available.

I have seen the tool that was used to do this it was a short rod
with a t-bar and a step in it’s size to only let it go a short
distance into the copper tube, it had a trapped ball bearing poking
out of the side, and a cam inside it. As you twisted the T-bar the
cam pushed the ball out to stretch a groove on the inside of the
copper tube.

I’d find a photo but I don’t know what it was called, the
girlfriend’s father who had one is long gone.

regards Tim Blades.


#4

The best thing for you to do is to goggle " tube flaring" and start
contacting the people that do that type of work. What you want to do
is a longer taper than usual, but you should find someone to do it
for you

Jesse